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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Hough

Hock \Hock\, Hough \Hough\, n. [ AS. h?h the heel; prob. akin to Icel. h[=a]sinn hock sinew, Dan. hasc, G. hechse, h["a]chse, LG. hacke, D. hak; also to L. coxa hip (cf. Cuisses), Skr. kaksha armpit. [root]12. Cf. Heel.]

    1. The joint in the hind limb of quadrupeds between the leg and shank, or tibia and tarsus, and corresponding to the ankle in man.

    2. A piece cut by butchers, esp. in pork, from either the front or hind leg, just above the foot.

  1. The popliteal space; the ham.

Hough

Hough \Hough\, v. t. To cut with a hoe. [Obs.]
--Johnson.

Hough

Hough \Hough\, n. Same as Hock, a joint.

Hough

Hough \Hough\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Houghed; p. pr. & vb. n. Houghing.] Same as Hock, to hamstring.

Hough

Hough \Hough\, n. [Cf. D. hak. Cf. Hack.] An adz; a hoe. [Obs.]
--Bp. Stillingfleet.

Wikipedia

Hough

Hough may refer to:

  • Hamstringing or severing the Achilles tendon of an animal
  • the leg or shin of an animal (in the Scots language), from which the dish potted hough is made
  • Hough (surname)

Hough (surname)

Hough is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Benson W. Hough (1875–1935), US federal judge
  • Charlie Hough
  • Derek Hough
  • Donald Hough
  • Emerson Hough
  • Frank Hough
  • Franklin B. Hough
  • George W. Hough (1836-1909) US Astronomer
  • Greg Hough
  • Henry Hughes Hough
  • James Hough, British physicist
  • Jason M. Hough, the author of The Dire Earth Cycle
  • Jerry F. Hough
  • John Hough (bishop) (1651–1743), English bishop
  • John Hough (director), film director
  • Paul Hough, film director
  • Julianne Hough
  • Kenneth Hough
  • Maxine Hough, American politician
  • Michael Hough (politician), American politician
  • Mike Hough
  • Richard Hough (1922–1999), British author and historian
  • Richard R. Hough (1917–1992), American engineer and executive
  • Romeyn Beck Hough (1857-1924), American botanist and physician
  • Stephen Hough, concert pianist
  • Walter Hough
Wiktionary

hough

Etymology 1 n. the hollow behind the knee vb. To hamstring Etymology 2

n. (archaic spelling of hoe English) vb. (archaic spelling of hoe English)

Usage examples of "hough".

Dorsey Hough, the regular Sunday watch officer in the all-service code room, made his usual casual, and distinctly unmilitary, entrance.

But Casey seldom had any pressing duties on Sunday and small talk with Hough had somehow become the custom every fourth weekend.

But today Hough was slouched at an empty desk in the outer room, reading the Sunday comics.

Dorsey Hough had a radio turned on full blast so he could hear it over the chatter of typewriters as sailors with headsets kept the message traffic of the Pacific Fleet flowing to Okinawa, San Francisco, Midway Island, and the ships at sea.

He, together with Director Mather and Emerson Hough, had been all through the wonderful Southern Utah country, including Bryce Canyon and Zion National Park.

Quinn was elected temporary President and Frank Hough temporary Secretary.

Louis and Milwaukee delegations, and by Secretary Hough of Philadelphia, Thomas Navin of Detroit and representatives from Boston and Providence.

Wade and Hough with their families, who had remained at Rangoon, were, after dreadful sufferings, safe under British protection.

Design by Laura Hammond Hough Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Hughart, Barry.

Doc Hough, the medical corpsman assigned to the platoon, was doing his best to save the one wounded Bos Kashi who survived the onesided fight.

Doc Hough knew enough to realize that Ensign Baccacio was dangerously close to going over the edge.

Their yoke creaked, they breathed heavily, and the muscles of their houghs were stretched as if they would burst.

Jakkin chuckled at his own flight of fancy, and Likkam houghed at him like an angry dragon.

Although she had only bought a half stone of flour, a pound of bacon ends, a pound of hough meat, a marrow bone and a few dry goods, each mile she walked seemed to add to the weight, and she had just passed the Rosier village and was within the last mile home when she smelt the smoke.

Their yoke creaked, they breathed heavily, and the muscles of their houghs were stretched as if they would burst.