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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

hot

I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cold/warm/hot spell
▪ There was a very cold spell in late November.
a hot commodity (=one that a lot of people want to buy)
▪ Web domains ending in .com became hot commodities.
a hot meal
▪ With a hot meal inside me, I began to feel better.
a hot topic (=one that a lot of people are discussing or arguing about)
▪ Gangs and drugs are the hot topics in this district.
a hot/warm drink
▪ Come inside and I’ll make you a hot drink.
a hot/warm/cool bath
▪ Why don't you have a nice warm bath?
a shade too big/hot/fast etc
▪ Matt’s clothes were just a shade too big for me.
boiling hot
▪ It was a boiling hot morning.
cold/hot compress
▪ Apply a cold compress to the injury.
hot air
▪ The theory was dismissed as a lot of hot air.
hot and sticky
▪ It was hot and sticky and there was nowhere to sit.
hot button
▪ Your letter certainly hit a hot button.
hot cake
▪ Copies of the book are selling like hot cakes.
hot chocolate
hot desk
hot dish
hot dog
hot dog
hot favourite
▪ He was the hot favourite for the Booker Prize.
hot flush
hot food
▪ She wanted a rest and some hot food.
hot gossip (=interesting gossip)
▪ What’s the latest hot gossip going round at work then?
hot key
hot link
hot on the trail of (=they are close to finding them)
▪ Police believe they are hot on the trail of a drug-smuggling gang .
hot pants
hot potato
▪ The issue has become a political hot potato.
hot rod
hot spot
▪ Many microwaves heat unevenly, leading to hot spots in the milk.
hot spring
hot springs
▪ There are several hot springs in the area.
hot tears
▪ I felt the hot tears running down my face.
hot tub
hot (=with a strong, burning taste that comes from strong spices)
▪ I love really hot curry.
hot
▪ They serve hot soup from mobile kitchens.
hot
▪ It had been a long hot summer.
hot
▪ The tea was too hot to drink.
hot
▪ Drink lots of water in hot weather.
hot
▪ There isn't any hot water!
hot/warm
▪ Can I have a cup of warm milk please?
in hot pursuit (=following closely behind)
▪ The quarterback sprinted toward the end zone with Jansen in hot pursuit.
political hot potato
▪ The issue has become a political hot potato.
scorching hot
▪ a scorching hot day
serve sth hot/cold etc
▪ Teacakes should be served hot with butter.
slave (away) over a hot stove (=cook – used humorously)
the cold/hot tap
▪ She scrubbed her hands under the cold tap.
the hot/warm sun
▪ The hot sun beat down on the men working.
warm/hot sunshine
▪ Don't spend too long in hot sunshine without a hat.
warm/hot
▪ Warm air rises and is replaced by cooler and denser air.
▪ I felt a sudden rush of hot air.
warm/hot
▪ Many people prefer to live where the climate is warm.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
air
▪ The steel rope had to be used because a normal tight rope wouldn't keep taut between two unpredictable hot air balloons.
▪ But there is another way to make it float, which is to fill it with hot air.
▪ As the hand was held on the blazing ring, the stench of burning flesh was clearly noticeable in the hot air.
▪ The campaign for a deregulated electric utility industry, like a balloon, is filled with a lot of hot air.
▪ But nothing could have prepared me for the hydraulic blast of hot air that came as I stepped out.
▪ Today, however, most recommendations are known to be hot air and tail-covering platitudes.
▪ He had the car heater on and the whirring as it blew out hot air was beginning to annoy him.
▪ You think this stuff about flying is a lot of hot air.
bath
▪ Singer's face was flushed as if he'd just got out of a hot bath.
▪ Christine eased out of bed and into the bathroom and ran a hot bath.
▪ Gin and hot baths, exercises.
▪ Actress Lindsay Wagner revealed her recipe to combat jet lag: Epsom salts and baking soda poured into a hot bath.
▪ I was a proper wife, ever ready with a hot bath and a soothing word for my weary provider.
▪ He would return to his apartment, take off his clothes, and sit in a hot bath.
▪ He kept thinking how nice it would be to lie in a hot bath and soak out the cold and the dirt.
▪ Some days she took a hot bath and let hot water fall out of a saturated washcloth.
cake
▪ All the rage, she says, selling like hot cakes.
▪ If you are having hot cakes, also order hash browns.
▪ Opren was selling like hot cakes.
▪ It should sell like hot cakes if I knock it into the right sort of shape.
▪ Cards depicting Santa in horribly compromising positions are selling like hot cakes.
▪ It smelled of hot cake rising in the oven.
chocolate
▪ Mostly it was hot chocolate she made, warming the milk in a saucepan on the stove before mixing it.
▪ He always drank tea in the morning, and she, suffering from an ulcer, always drank hot chocolate.
▪ Phoebe made all three of them hot chocolate.
▪ The church-run concession was open, selling coffee and hot chocolate.
▪ If only I hadn't had that last cup of hot chocolate.
▪ Books serves coffee and the tastiest hot chocolate in town.
▪ We rode into the Place St Michel and sat in a café drinking hot chocolate.
▪ In the evening, the Lanes offer warm conversation along with cool drinks, coffee, tea or hot chocolate.
coal
▪ It was our shovelful of hot coals for the brazier.
▪ Add a few hot coals after 30 minutes to maintain even heat.
▪ Selma arrived escorting two braziers, one to keep the coffee pots hot and another for hot coals for the incense pots.
▪ That would explain why Clemson's football recruits can walk on hot coals....
▪ Throw a few twigs of rosemary, fennel or lavender on to hot coals for extra fragrance.
▪ The sausages are also excellent grilled over hot coals.
▪ I'd have walked across hot coals for my grandfather.
▪ Wipe excess marinade off quail and grill quail, skin side down, over hot coals for 4 to 5 minutes.
coffee
▪ He would be craving hot coffee and food.
▪ A typical menu consisted of tomato surprise, assorted cold meats, sandwiches, fruit cup, cake, and hot coffee.
▪ Then he fetched a mug and a can of hot coffee.
▪ Boiling hot coffee shot out in a stream on to my leg.
▪ I pour a hot coffee, and sit sipping at it in my kitchen armchair.
▪ We are going to have ourselves some nice hot coffee and you can lie there and watch.
▪ Inside it was warm with the smell of hot coffee and fried pork.
country
▪ The rich in hot countries made for the mountains.
▪ It also represents life itself Where a tree grows, life can exist and this is especially recognized in a hot country.
▪ Tyler recommended that pesticide tests be developed specially for hot countries.
▪ Being out in those hot countries, you know, he's never had a chance to learn.
▪ Chocolate calls for an alternative recipe in hot countries if it is to maintain its texture and taste.
▪ They evolved in the bloodstreams of people in hot countries as a defence against malaria and occur mainly in black people.
day
▪ It was a hot day, and I think I must have been half asleep when I noticed something very strange.
▪ It was going to be a hot day.
▪ It was true there were many snakes there on hot days sunning themselves but that did not worry him.
▪ A boiling hot day it was, everybody red-faced and sweating.
▪ One hot day I remember leaving guns and clothes along the river bank and swimming without a stitch on.
▪ At the end of six weeks 1 was sitting in a taverna in Sparta in the evening of a long hot day.
drink
▪ He said he supposed it was and offered to show them into the Intensive Care room which had a hot drinks machine.
▪ Gone was the free and easy time of three meals a day and as many hot drinks as we liked.
▪ I wish I'd got some cos I could really do with a hot drink.
▪ It was only enough for one hot meal per day, plus two brew-ups for hot drinks at breakfast and at midday.
▪ Alida went downstairs, stooping a little, not knowing that she stooped, annoyed at the trouble a hot drink caused.
▪ Hot pasties and hot drinks are served below deck at the bar, a comfort on chilly days.
▪ All hot drinks also each have two teaspoons of sugar added.
▪ Then he remembered the hot drink he'd promised her.
flush
▪ Hot drinks cause sweating and hot flushes in the face and head.
▪ He underlined passages about hot flushes and stress.
▪ Heat on top of the head; feet burn at night in bed, hot flushes rising up.
▪ This treatment can reduce hot flushes and vaginal thinning and is also highly effective against osteoporosis.
▪ Also, hot flushes are quite easily camouflaged with such exertion.
▪ All this with a thudding heart, hot flushes and the school run?
▪ The muscles of his arms and chest were rippling as he moved and she felt a hot flush creeping over her body.
food
▪ They had microwave ovens where he was able to heat up a portion of hot food to eat in the car.
▪ Toucans sit in cages and aluminum pots steam with hot food, stewed beef and chicken or sausage and potatoes.
▪ Perhaps after the hot food in the evening?
▪ We delivered hot food, clothing, mail, and ammunition to them every day.
▪ Keep hot food and cold food cold.
▪ So school becomes a sanctuary, a haven of stability, hot food and teachers who care.
▪ An application has been made to establish a hot food shop adjacent to the chip shop.
▪ There were lots of times we were resupplied with hot food.
issue
▪ Radon exposure is the hottest issue among radiation scientists today - but it remains almost entirely unknown to the public.
▪ Despite the ominous thunder of global war, the date on which to observe Thanksgiving was a hot issue.
▪ Salah had succeeded in creating a hot issue.
▪ Lockwood said any new city manager is inevitably confronted with one or two hot issues fairly quickly.
line
▪ It was as if she had a hot line to the Devil.
▪ This is a hot line established by state child welfare agencies for the reporting of child abuse.
▪ The white, hot line certainly wouldn't.
▪ The Army, which has set up a toll-free hot line, is investigating more than 200 allegations throughout the service.
▪ Paper-thin knives of light penetrated through air vents in the dispenser's casing and drew hot lines across Bernice's face.
▪ The information will be collected on a confidential hot line, called Raceguard, operating on a 24-hour answerphone from next Tuesday.
▪ Union leaders say the hot line is needed badly.
meal
▪ It was by now that and I wondered whether chilli had been a good choice for a hot meal.
▪ Instead of having parents pack lunches, he decided the kids should get free, hot meals.
▪ With a warm fire, and a hot meal, I began to recover from my unpleasant experiences.
▪ Why have a separate bureaucracy charged with one small thing-delivering hot meals to the elderly?
▪ During cold weather, hot meals and plenty of hot drinks will make you feel warmer inside.
▪ What is so special about a hot meal anyway?
▪ His wet, cold body was aching and calling out for a hot meal and warm bed.
▪ You want us all home for hot meals!
potato
▪ And Ireland was the sort of hot potato a Bagshaw feared most.
▪ In Gloucestershire for instance, it's the hottest of hot potatoes.
▪ It had become a political hot potato, and time ran out as backers bickered over what tests to run.
▪ Not so much political hot potatoes, as political sweeteners.
▪ That's when you see the Colonel and his council playing pass-the-parcel with a hot potato.
pursuit
▪ He would chase after them with me in hot pursuit, so he had to go back.
▪ The first time a car approached I ran from it, thinking it was an agent of Edna in hot pursuit.
▪ The incumbent is now off in hot pursuit of government funding for the much-enlarged interoperability lab, see above.
▪ A pack leader saw the police in hot pursuit, called six Sturmabteilungen to him and led them into the stadium.
▪ Is he satisfied with the present arrangements for hot pursuit?
▪ Seeing Naseby in hot pursuit running on foot after the cart almost convinced him it was.
▪ She promptly set down her plate of lobster salad and set off in hot pursuit.
seat
▪ City player-manager Peter Reid, still a rookie in the hot seat, has done a fine job since replacing Howard Kendall.
▪ Wilkinson and Manion will be in the hot seat.
▪ He was in the hot seat for more than three hours.
▪ There are as many as five coaches currently on the hot seat.
▪ Tips Always address the person in the hot seat by the name of the character you have chosen.
▪ Because there is no way I would want to be on the hot seat Smith now finds himself.
▪ This will help the person in the hot seat to become more relaxed and confident in the role of the character.
▪ That mix-up was just one of several election problems that put then-Registrar of Voters Germaine Wong on the hot seat.
spot
▪ But melanoma country is any hot spot.
▪ Commercial banking was a surprising hot spot.
▪ The effect of a downward draught is that the development of hot spots in the kiln is minimised.
▪ Fish populations shrank, and captains spent more time looking for hot spots.
▪ One of the world's hot spots that might give clues for the future.
▪ The clusters of hot spots were yet another case of inside affecting outside.
▪ The hot spots contain 133,149 species of plants and 9,645 of vertebrates.
▪ One day, I remember, we were over an area and getting all sorts of hot spots.
spring
▪ The lake is noted for its hot springs, steam jets and geysers.
▪ Scientists hope the coming generation of Mars probes will detect former hot springs.
▪ Hot, hydrothermally altered ground and relatively weak fumaroles, but no active hot springs, are found on these volcanoes.
▪ Hippie dips, or hot pots, are circles of rocks built around natural hot springs.
▪ And it had been so since the day that she had turned to leave Sycorax at the hot springs.
▪ Are they always among the first colonizers, the weeds of this hot spring ecosystem?
▪ It is a special feature of Baden that the hot springs belong to the hotels.
▪ These rocks, he says, contain the same chemicals that are Supersaturated in the hot springs today.
stuff
▪ These are pretty hot stuff so it is £80 I am afraid.
▪ Flings like the recent Los Angeles Salsa Festival are proof that hoofers have the hot stuff.
▪ It's hot stuff you're dealing with.
summer
▪ Another mild spring and long, hot summer?
▪ We stood out in the hot summer sun, but minutes later were ushered back in.
▪ It was a hot summer day, and our employees were dressed... casually.
▪ Some people are looking forward to less harsh winters and longer, hotter summers.
▪ The refreshing spray was much savored by visitors to the fair during that hot summer of 1876.
sun
▪ Avoid the very hot sun around the middle of the day. 3.
▪ The hot sun was beginning to take its toll on the fragile trees.
▪ For hot sun to drive away the chill inside her.
▪ The guests pick and eat strawberries under a hot sun.
▪ Coconuts grew almost to the edge of the silver strip of coral beach, which sparkled in the hot sun.
▪ The train had been delayed several times and held at sidings under the hot sun.
▪ Soon, though, smoke is coming out of the straw-stack and hot sun is turning the water into steam.
▪ Bwoy, you sit in de hot sun tod long.
tap
▪ She stretched to manipulate the hot tap with her toe.
▪ Pour hottest tap water into the larger baking pan to a depth of 1 inch.
▪ She apologizes because there seems to be no hot water coming out of the hot tap.
▪ I shivered and reached for the hot taps but changed my mind.
▪ For under-sink installation it is essential to use the purpose-designed hot tap supplied by the heater manufacturer.
▪ The bedroom lock is insecure and only one hot tap on a swivel trickles into both bath and basin.
▪ I wash it every Saturday, under the hot tap.
▪ You like a nice wash under the hot tap.
topic
▪ Page description languages are currently a hot topic with much being written about the relative strengths and weaknesses of the various offerings.
▪ The hot topic in political circles here is who might become Sen.
▪ Aphid insecticide resistance-a hot topic for beet and potato growers as well as horticulturalists.
▪ The other hot topic at E3 this time was the new 3-D add-in cards for personal computers.
▪ The next decade looks promising - especially for those who study the newly hot topic of neutrinos.
▪ Friday, 29 years after he was slain by a single rifle shot, his assassination is once again a hot topic.
▪ The subject of pensions is likely to be a hot topic at Labour's annual conference in October.
tub
▪ One reveller was already pouring bubble bath into a huge hot tub so he and his partner could frolic in the suds.
▪ In one issue, Slepian agonizes over buying a $ 7, 000 hot tub.
▪ But if you want to try a hot tub I can do better than that.
▪ Typical Californian, thinking hot tubs and tax brackets.
▪ It boasts a hot tub, tennis court, heated pool and several smashing views of the Potomac.
▪ A sixteen-room hotel with a hot tub out back, and no guests.
water
▪ The brewer must now extract these sugars by adding more hot water and so transfers the mash to a mash-tun.
▪ Illegal testing can land employers in hot water to the tune of $ 10, 000 per violation.
▪ If it is, hot water will flow into the radiator from the pipework and displace the trapped air.
▪ For $ 45, 1 luxuriate at midnight in a tub brimming with hot water.
▪ She'd come and give me a hot water bottle.
▪ I took it in the bowl of hot water, with the soap, into the room where Claude was sleeping.
▪ You run down and make sure there's hot water.
▪ Rising hot water pulls with it a surrounding sheath of cold water, effectively insulating the base of the jet.
weather
▪ Canvas plimsolls are a better, cheaper bet for keeping cool in hot weather.
▪ Berry production, which begins in June and continues through October, will taper off in really hot weather.
▪ She had few clothes, and fewer still suitable for the hot weather.
▪ Savoys do fine in hot weather if given some shade.
▪ We had some hot weather, but with an eiderdown of cloud under the sun.
▪ But, you also should discover, the builders did think of some ways to keep the house cooler in hot weather.
▪ Fabric boots are light and comfortable, and are ideal for use in hot weather.
▪ In hot weather, clean air conditioner filters.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(hard/hot/close) on sb's heels
(hard/hot/close) on the heels of sth
▪ Critique followed hot on the heels of this pioneering work.
▪ On the heels of this came Mr J. to tell us that young Mrs P. had had her thighbone crushed.
▪ Then it seemed that the consummation would follow soon on the heels of its inauguration.
▪ With another couple of laps he might have finished close on the heels of the two Dunlops.
be selling/going like hot cakes
blow hot and cold
▪ I can't tell what he wants - he keeps blowing hot and cold.
▪ In our dealings with the police we have found that they can blow hot and cold. Sometimes they are keen to have media help in solving a crime, other times they are more reluctant.
▪ Some of these young officers blow hot and cold.
burning hot
▪ Heat waves rose off the burning hot desert sands.
▪ But then he covered her, his naked body burning hot, heavy but not crushing, strong and powerful.
▪ Her breath was short, her lips burning hot from the touch of his.
▪ I take a quick breakfast myself, and a short nap. 8: 00-8: 05 AMThe sun is burning hot.
▪ Obviously the inner layer was punctured because the outer skin was burning hot against her chill fingers.
▪ She was burning hot with embarrassment and guilt.
▪ There at last was the fire burning hot, high and welcoming.
have/get the hots for sb
▪ I think he's got the hots for you, Elaine.
▪ But my, what a great body - no wonder Luke's got the hots for you.
▪ Well, Big Breakfast's Donna Air seems to have the hots for him.
hot dog roast/oyster roast etc
hotter/colder/better etc than ever
▪ And that incentive was increased when they got personal recognition and satisfaction from doing it better than ever before.
▪ He says the new films are better than ever.
▪ Organised by the Alton and District Arts Council, the week promises to be better than ever.
▪ The moviemaking machine that Walt Disney created sixty years ago is working better than ever today.
▪ The National Health Service is now better than ever.
▪ The opportunities now are better than ever.
▪ This year's attractions are bigger and better than ever, with events running from Tuesday to Saturday.
▪ Watermen talked about their catches so far this year, which they said have been better than ever.
in the hot seat
▪ City player-manager Peter Reid, still a rookie in the hot seat, has done a fine job since replacing Howard Kendall.
▪ He was in the hot seat for more than three hours.
▪ Put them in the hot seat and question then to find out.
▪ This will help the person in the hot seat to become more relaxed and confident in the role of the character.
▪ Tips Always address the person in the hot seat by the name of the character you have chosen.
▪ We can put Ant in the hot seat to find out.
▪ Wilkinson and Manion will be in the hot seat.
like a (hot) knife through butter
▪ Lori seemed to go through men like a knife through butter.
like a cat on hot bricks
piping hot
▪ An individual pie, topped with vanilla ice cream, is served piping hot to your table.
▪ Food should not be too hot, however, so you should avoid serving piping hot boiled meals.
▪ Or how the mayonnaise melted into a piping hot baked potato?
▪ Stir the clams into the sauce and heat for a further 1-2min until piping hot. 4.
▪ The chefs prepare your selections as you order them so they're served piping hot.
▪ There was a fruit pie of some sort with delicious crust pastry - each helping covered with freshly made piping hot custard.
▪ They arrive at the table still piping hot from the pan with an exterior that is crisp and light.
▪ To keep things piping hot and juicy, the meats are served on heated plates.
sell like hot cakes
steaming hot
▪ Later, we carried steaming hot water through the Buffalo snowdrifts to thaw our chickens' wafer bucket.
▪ The memories crowded in around me as I sat with a nice cup of steaming hot water, writing in longhand.
strike while the iron is hot
▪ Don't wait until tomorrow before you tell him, strike while the iron is hot!
▪ So, it should strike while the iron is hot and go to the country as soon as possible.
unseasonably warm/cold/hot etc
▪ Harvesting began early in Bordeaux as well, due to unseasonably warm weather.
▪ It was mid-summer, and unseasonably warm for Glasgow.
▪ The cherry tree was coming into blossom, encouraged by the unseasonably warm sunshine.
▪ The mid-afternoon sun was still unseasonably warm, and there were children bathing in the sea.
▪ The night being unseasonably warm, most of the windows were wide open.
▪ The spring day was unseasonably warm, and after two hour's tuition she went into the clubhouse.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
hot salsa
▪ a hot summer's day
▪ a pot of hot coffee
▪ At the end of the day all I want to do is to relax in a nice hot bath.
▪ Be careful! That pan's still very hot.
▪ Bea was hot and tired from the long walk home.
▪ Cook the steaks over red hot coals.
▪ Don't touch the barbecue - it's burning hot.
▪ Dozens of volunteers serve hot meals to 200 homeless people every night.
▪ I'm too hot - could you open the window?
▪ I make a lot of salads during hot weather.
▪ Isn't it hot today?
▪ It's hot in here. Isn't the air conditioner working?
▪ It's going to be a hot, sunny day.
▪ It's too hot to go for a bike ride.
▪ It was hot and humid in the Caribbean.
▪ It was much too hot in his office to do any work.
▪ It was the hottest summer this century.
▪ Jimbo had a hot night in Las Vegas and won $430.
▪ Levi's 501 jeans continue to be a hot item.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Does your relationship run hot and cold?
▪ For $ 45, 1 luxuriate at midnight in a tub brimming with hot water.
▪ Grill over hot coals until rare to medium-rare, 2 to 3 minutes per side.
▪ Obviously, it's.., the hot water tank.
▪ Pour the hot fudge over the marshmallows.
▪ Recently we have had trouble with the engine misfiring and stalling, even when hot.
▪ She'd come and give me a hot water bottle.
▪ Turned on a tap: hot water!
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(hard/hot/close) on sb's heels
(hard/hot/close) on the heels of sth
▪ Critique followed hot on the heels of this pioneering work.
▪ On the heels of this came Mr J. to tell us that young Mrs P. had had her thighbone crushed.
▪ Then it seemed that the consummation would follow soon on the heels of its inauguration.
▪ With another couple of laps he might have finished close on the heels of the two Dunlops.
be selling/going like hot cakes
burning hot
▪ Heat waves rose off the burning hot desert sands.
▪ But then he covered her, his naked body burning hot, heavy but not crushing, strong and powerful.
▪ Her breath was short, her lips burning hot from the touch of his.
▪ I take a quick breakfast myself, and a short nap. 8: 00-8: 05 AMThe sun is burning hot.
▪ Obviously the inner layer was punctured because the outer skin was burning hot against her chill fingers.
▪ She was burning hot with embarrassment and guilt.
▪ There at last was the fire burning hot, high and welcoming.
have/get the hots for sb
▪ I think he's got the hots for you, Elaine.
▪ But my, what a great body - no wonder Luke's got the hots for you.
▪ Well, Big Breakfast's Donna Air seems to have the hots for him.
hot dog roast/oyster roast etc
hotter/colder/better etc than ever
▪ And that incentive was increased when they got personal recognition and satisfaction from doing it better than ever before.
▪ He says the new films are better than ever.
▪ Organised by the Alton and District Arts Council, the week promises to be better than ever.
▪ The moviemaking machine that Walt Disney created sixty years ago is working better than ever today.
▪ The National Health Service is now better than ever.
▪ The opportunities now are better than ever.
▪ This year's attractions are bigger and better than ever, with events running from Tuesday to Saturday.
▪ Watermen talked about their catches so far this year, which they said have been better than ever.
in the hot seat
▪ City player-manager Peter Reid, still a rookie in the hot seat, has done a fine job since replacing Howard Kendall.
▪ He was in the hot seat for more than three hours.
▪ Put them in the hot seat and question then to find out.
▪ This will help the person in the hot seat to become more relaxed and confident in the role of the character.
▪ Tips Always address the person in the hot seat by the name of the character you have chosen.
▪ We can put Ant in the hot seat to find out.
▪ Wilkinson and Manion will be in the hot seat.
like a (hot) knife through butter
▪ Lori seemed to go through men like a knife through butter.
like a cat on hot bricks
piping hot
▪ An individual pie, topped with vanilla ice cream, is served piping hot to your table.
▪ Food should not be too hot, however, so you should avoid serving piping hot boiled meals.
▪ Or how the mayonnaise melted into a piping hot baked potato?
▪ Stir the clams into the sauce and heat for a further 1-2min until piping hot. 4.
▪ The chefs prepare your selections as you order them so they're served piping hot.
▪ There was a fruit pie of some sort with delicious crust pastry - each helping covered with freshly made piping hot custard.
▪ They arrive at the table still piping hot from the pan with an exterior that is crisp and light.
▪ To keep things piping hot and juicy, the meats are served on heated plates.
steaming hot
▪ Later, we carried steaming hot water through the Buffalo snowdrifts to thaw our chickens' wafer bucket.
▪ The memories crowded in around me as I sat with a nice cup of steaming hot water, writing in longhand.
unseasonably warm/cold/hot etc
▪ Harvesting began early in Bordeaux as well, due to unseasonably warm weather.
▪ It was mid-summer, and unseasonably warm for Glasgow.
▪ The cherry tree was coming into blossom, encouraged by the unseasonably warm sunshine.
▪ The mid-afternoon sun was still unseasonably warm, and there were children bathing in the sea.
▪ The night being unseasonably warm, most of the windows were wide open.
▪ The spring day was unseasonably warm, and after two hour's tuition she went into the clubhouse.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ By 1986 things were hotting up a bit.
▪ The pace of reforms to working practices is also hotting up.
Wikipedia

Hot (Israel)

Hot Telecommunication Systems Ltd. is a company that provides cable television, last-mile Internet access, broadband and telecommunication services in Israel. It also provides various data transmission services and network services at different rates, services to the business sector and other ancillary services. In November 2004, Hot Telecom commenced providing domestic fixed line telephone services to residential and business subscribers. The company’s shares are traded on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange and is a constitute of the TA-100 Index.

In March 2013, the company employed 3,958 workers.

Hot (Squirrel Nut Zippers album)

Hot is the second studio album by Squirrel Nut Zippers, released in 1996.

Hot (American vocal group)

Hot was a vocal trio based in Los Angeles, California, whose membership was Gwen Owens (born June 19, 1953), Cathy Carson (née Catherine Sue Fiebach) (October 8, 1953 – June 26, 2014) and Juanita Curiel (born February 25, 1953): the group had a million-selling hit single in 1977 entitled " Angel in Your Arms".

Hot

Hot or HOT may refer to:

Hot (Freda Payne album)

Hot was Freda Payne's ninth studio album and her third and final for Capitol Records. Although she did record a few singles during the 1980s (including three for Ian Levine's UK Motorcity label), it would be 16 years before Payne came out with another studio album.

HOT (missile)

The HOT (Haut subsonique Optiquement Téléguidé Tiré d'un Tube, or High Subsonic Optical Remote-Guided, Tube-Launched) is a second-generation long-range anti-tank missile system developed originally as an effort to meet a joint German-French Army requirement, by the then German firm Bölkow and the French firm Nord, to replace the older SS.11 wire guided missile which was in service with both nations. A few years later, Bölkow and Nord merged into MBB and Aérospatiale respectively, both of which firms later formed Euromissile to design and produce the MILAN, Roland and HOT.

This firm (now MBDA), is a joint corporation of French and German defense firms. The HOT has become one of the most successful missiles of its class, with tens of thousands of missiles produced, used by no fewer than a dozen countries worldwide, and validated in combat in several wars. The missile system is also commonly mounted on light and medium armored vehicles, and attack helicopters.

The HOT entered limited production in 1976, with mass production of 800 missiles a month reached in 1978. The HOT became initially operational with the German and French armies fitted to specialized armored antitank vehicles. In addition, Euromissile was in the enviable position of having large export orders from Middle East nations at the start of mass production. This was likely due to the situation in the late 1970s where many nations did not want to rely solely on arms purchases from the USSR combined with the US Congress restrictions on the export sales of the TOW antitank missile.

In Europe, the end of the service life of the HOT missile system is in sight with the French opting to purchase Hellfire II missiles for their Tiger-HAD attack helicopters and the Germans planning to transition to the PARS 3 LR. Austria has decommissioned its HOT-carrying tank destroyers, while Spain is transitioning to Spike missiles to replace their HOT missile inventory. The HOT missile continues to be in widespread use in other areas of the world.

Hot (Half Japanese album)

Hot is an album released by the rock group Half Japanese.

Hot (Paul Bley album)

Hot is a live album by Canadian jazz pianist Paul Bley recorded in 1985 and released on the Italian Soul Note label.

Hot (Smash Mouth song)

"Hot" is a song performed by Smash Mouth . The song was released on their 2003 album Get the Picture?. It was released as a single on July 24, 2003.

Hot (Mel B album)

Hot is the debut album by British pop singer Melanie B, released on 9 October 2000 by Virgin. The album was not as successful as her albums with the Spice Girls or that of other members solo albums released around this time. It peaked at number twenty-eight in United Kingdom and sold over 60,000 copies, receiving a silver certification. The album had four singles: " I Want You Back", featuring Missy Elliott, " Tell Me", " Feels So Good" and " Lullaby". The first three singles reached top 5 in United Kingdom. The single " Word Up", previously released on the soundtrack of the film Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, was included on the Japanese version. The album received mixed to negative reviews from critics.

Hot (Avril Lavigne song)

"Hot" is a song by Canadian singer-songwriter Avril Lavigne, taken as the third single from her third studio album, The Best Damn Thing (2007). The song was written by Lavigne and Evan Taubenfeld, while it was produced by Lukasz "Dr. Luke" Gottwald. The pop rock ballad talks about her feelings about a boyfriend, who makes her "hot". The song received positive reviews from music critics, who praised its "old-style" vibe and its anthemic nature. A version of the chorus in Mandarin was released in China and Japan.

Commercially, the song was more successful in Australia, Canada and a few European countries, while it was a commercial disappointment in the United States. Lavigne performed the song at the 2007 MTV Europe Music Awards, American Music Awards, on The Friday Night Project and many more. The music video directed by Matthew Rolston shows Lavigne in a more "sexy" way, with a "1920s burlesque" theme.

Hot (Beatnuts song)

"Hot" is the first single from Milk Me, a 2004 album by East Coast hip hop group The Beatnuts. It was released by Penalty Recordings as a 12 inch and CD single without any b-sides or additional tracks. The song is produced by The Beatnuts and features raps by Juju and Psycho Les, as well as ad libs sung by Greg Nice. The song's lyrics are braggadocios, hard-hitting and aggressive. The song's beat is characterized by a fast pounding horn loop and matching drums sampled from " Rock Box" by Run-D.M.C.. The song also features live instrumentation provided by guitarist Eric Krasno and keyboardist Neal Evans.

Although "Hot" failed to chart, it received positive critical attention: Jason Birchmeier of Allmusic and Tom Doggett of RapReviews.com consider it a "standout song". Robert DeGracia of AllHipHop.com describes why the track stands out:

The popularity of "Hot" earned it a spot on the 2005 soundtrack for the film King's Ransom. In 2004, a HipHopSite.com exclusive remix of "Hot" was released in 7" format.

Hot (Taeyang album)

Hot is the first extended play (EP) and first solo album by Korean singer Taeyang, member of Big Bang. The album was well received by fans and critics alike, winning two trophies from The 6th Korean Music Awards for the 2008 Best R&B/Soul Song (나만 바라봐, "Only Look At Me") and the 2008 Best R&B/Soul Album (Hot). Taeyang is the first "Idol group" or boyband member to receive such awards.

Two singles were released from the album, "Gido" (; "Prayer") and "Naman Barabwa" (Hangul: "나만 바라봐"; "Only Look At Me"), with music videos produced for each song. "Make Love" from this album was remade by Big Bang to be featured in their Japanese album Number 1. Bandmate G-Dragon recorded a "Part two" version of "Only Look At Me", and released it as a digital single, "나만 바라봐 Part 2 (Only Look At Me Part 2)." Both versions were performed at the M.Net MKMF Awards, where each member of Big Bang performed a song with Korean singer Hyori Lee.

Hot (James Brown album)

Hot is the 45th studio album by American musician James Brown. The album was released on January 1, 1976, by Polydor Records.

Hot (Inna album)

Hot is the debut studio album of Romanian recording artist Inna. It was released in Romania on April 19, 2010 by her Romanian label Roton Records. The standard edition content eleven tracks while the Romanian edition contains fourteen tracks, one of them being the new recorded song " 10 Minutes". The track also was part of the album re-release in certain countries in spring 2010. After the massive debut track " Hot" and the follow up singles " Love", " Amazing" and the Bob Taylor song " Déjà Vu", in which Inna appears as a featured artist, "10 Minutes" was released as the fifth single taken from the album. In France and the United Kingdom the track " Sun Is Up" was released as a sixth single from "Hot" while in other countries it was the lead single from Inna's second album " I Am The Club Rocker!". The album went on to sell 120,000 copies in France, 80,000 copies in the Netherlands, 50,000 copies in Mexico, 35,000 copies in Belgium, 30,000 copies in Poland, 20,000 copies in Romania, 20,000 copies in Portugal, 15,000 copies in Hungary and approximately 20,000 copies in the United Kingdom. In the United States and Canada it has sold less than 10,000 copies as of September 2011. Overall, the album has sold over 1 million units worldwide.

Hot (Inna song)

"Hot" is a song by Romanian singer Inna, extracted from her debut studio album, Hot (2009). Written and produced by Sebastian Barac, Radu Bolfea and Marcel Botezan of Play & Win, "Hot" was released late as the lead single from her debut studio album, Hot (2009). The song is an uptempo electro house song, with it containing elements of trance music. Lyrically, it tells a story of how strong a connection between two lovers can become. Contemporary critics received "Hot" very well, with reviewers complimenting its beats, simplicity and effectiveness.

The track was a commercial success, reaching the top-ten in Belgium, Spain, Hungary, Czech Republic, France, Netherlands and Romania. "Hot" has been accompanied by two European club-themed official music video versions, with the first being released on 10 November 2008. Inna has promoted the song at various gigs across Europe and has also performed it on the 2009 Eska Music Awards, Legendario Ice Experience, Loop Live and the Sopot Hit Festival in Poland.

Hot (I Need to Be Loved, Loved, Loved)

"Hot (I Need To Be Loved, Loved, Loved, Loved)", also known as "Hot (I Need to Be Loved, Loved, Loved)", is a funk song by James Brown. Released as a single in December 1975, it reached #31 on the R&B chart. It uses the main riff from the David Bowie song " Fame", released earlier the same year. (Guitarist Carlos Alomar, who created the borrowed riff and was a co-writer on "Fame", was briefly in James Brown's band in the late 1960s.) The song also appeared as the lead track on Brown's 1976 album Hot.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Hot

Hote \Hote\, v. t. & i. [pres. & imp. Hatte, Hot, etc.; p. p. Hote, Hoten, Hot, etc. See Hight, Hete.]

  1. To command; to enjoin. [Obs.]
    --Piers Plowman.

  2. To promise. [Obs.]
    --Chaucer.

  3. To be called; to be named. [Obs.]

    There as I was wont to hote Arcite, Now hight I Philostrate, not worth a mite.
    --Chaucer.

Hot

Hote \Hote\, v. t. & i. [pres. & imp. Hatte, Hot, etc.; p. p. Hote, Hoten, Hot, etc. See Hight, Hete.]

  1. To command; to enjoin. [Obs.]
    --Piers Plowman.

  2. To promise. [Obs.]
    --Chaucer.

  3. To be called; to be named. [Obs.]

    There as I was wont to hote Arcite, Now hight I Philostrate, not worth a mite.
    --Chaucer.

Hot

Hot \Hot\, imp. & p. p. of Hote. [Obs.]
--Spenser.

Hot

Hot \Hot\, a. [Compar. Hotter; superl. Hottest.] [OE. hot, hat, AS. h[=a]t; akin to OS. h[=e]t, D. heet, OHG. heiz, G. heiss, Icel. heitr, Sw. het, Dan. heed, hed; cf. Goth. heit[=o] fever, hais torch. Cf. Heat.]

  1. Having much sensible heat; exciting the feeling of warmth in a great degree; very warm; -- opposed to cold, and exceeding warm in degree; as, a hot stove; hot water or air. ``A hotvenison pasty.''
    --Shak.

  2. Characterized by heat, ardor, or animation; easily excited; firely; vehement; passionate; violent; eager.

    Achilles is impatient, hot, and revengeful.
    --Dryden.

    There was mouthing in hot haste.
    --Byron.

  3. Lustful; lewd; lecherous.
    --Shak.

  4. Acrid; biting; pungent; as, hot as mustard.

    Hot bed (Iron Manuf.), an iron platform in a rolling mill, on which hot bars, rails, etc., are laid to cool.

    Hot wall (Gardening), a wall provided with flues for the conducting of heat, to hasten the growth of fruit trees or the ripening of fruit.

    Hot well (Condensing Engines), a receptacle for the hot water drawn from the condenser by the air pump. This water is returned to the boiler, being drawn from the hot well by the feed pump.

    In hot water (Fig.), in trouble; in difficulties. [Colloq.]

    Syn: Burning; fiery; fervid; glowing; eager; animated; brisk; vehement; precipitate; violent; furious; ardent; fervent; impetuous; irascible; passionate; hasty; excitable.

Hot

Hight \Hight\, v. t. & i. [imp. Hight, Hot, p. p. Hight, Hote (?), Hoten (?). See Hote.] [OE. heiten, highten, haten, hoten; also hight, hatte, hette, is called, was called, AS. h[=a]tan to call, name, be called, to command, promise; also h[=a]tte is called, was called; akin to G. heissen to call, be called, bid, Goth. haitan to call, in the passive, to be called.]

  1. To be called or named. [Archaic & Poetic.]

    Note: In the form hight, it is used in a passive sense as a present, meaning is called or named, also as a preterite, was called or named. This form has also been used as a past participle. See Hote.

    The great poet of Italy, That highte Dante.
    --Chaucer.

    Bright was her hue, and Geraldine she hight.
    --Surrey.

    Entered then into the church the Reverend Teacher. Father he hight, and he was, in the parish.
    --Longfellow.

    Childe Harold was he hight.
    --Byron.

  2. To command; to direct; to impel. [Obs.]

    But the sad steel seized not where it was hight Upon the child, but somewhat short did fall.
    --Spenser.

  3. To commit; to intrust. [Obs.]

    Yet charge of them was to a porter hight.
    --Spenser.

  4. To promise. [Obs.]

    He had hold his day, as he had hight.
    --Chaucer.

Wiktionary

hot

  1. 1 Of an object, having a high temperature. 2 Of the weather, causing the air to be hot. 3 Of a person or animal, feeling the sensation of heat, especially to the point of discomfort. 4 feverish. 5 Of food, spicy. 6 (lb en informal) Very good, remarkable, exciting. (from the 19thc.) 7 steal. (from the 20thc.) 8 (lb en incomparable) electrically charged 9 (lb en informal) radioactive. (from the 20thc.) 10 (lb en slang) Of a person, very physically or sexually attractive. 11 (lb en slang) sexual; involving sexual intercourse or sexual excitement. 12 popular; in demand. 13 Very close to finding or guessing something to be found or guessed. 14 performing strongly; having repeated successes. 15 fresh; just released. 16 uncomfortable, difficult to deal with; awkward, dangerous, unpleasant. v

  2. 1 (cx lang=en with ''up'') To heat; to make or become hot. 2 (cx lang=en with ''up'') To become lively or exciting.

WordNet

hot

  1. adj. used of physical heat; having a high or higher than desirable temperature or giving off heat or feeling or causing a sensation of heat or burning; "hot stove"; "hot water"; "a hot August day"; "a hot stuffy room"; "she's hot and tired"; "a hot forehead" [ant: cold]

  2. characterized by violent and forceful activity or movement; very intense; "the fighting became hot and heavy"; "a hot engagement"; "a raging battle"; "the river became a raging torrent" [syn: raging]

  3. extended meanings; especially of psychological heat; marked by intensity or vehemence especially of passion or enthusiasm; "a hot temper"; "a hot topic"; "a hot new book"; "a hot love affair"; "a hot argument" [ant: cold]

  4. (color) bold and intense; "hot pink"

  5. sexually excited or exciting; "was hot for her"; "hot pants"

  6. recently stolen or smuggled; "hot merchandise"; "a hot car"

  7. very fast; "a blistering pace"; "got off to a hot start"; "in hot pursuit"; "a red-hot line drive" [syn: blistering, red-hot]

  8. wanted by the police; "a hot suspect"

  9. performed or performing with unusually great skill and daring and energy; "a hot drummer"; "he's hot tonight"

  10. having a piquant burning taste of spices or peppers; "gingery Chinese food"; "hot peppers"; "hot curry"; "corn chips with peppery salsa"; "spicy tomato sauce" [syn: gingery, peppery, spicy]

  11. very popular or successful; "one of the hot young talents"; "cabbage patch dolls were hot last season"

  12. very unpleasant or even dangerous; "make it hot for him"; "in the hot seat"; "in hot water"

  13. newest or most recent; "news hot off the press"; "red-hot information" [syn: red-hot]

  14. having or bringing unusually good luck; "hot at craps"; "the dice are hot tonight"

  15. very good; often used in the negative; "he's hot at math but not so hot at history"

  16. newly made; "a hot scent"

  17. capable of quick response and great speed; "a hot sports car"

  18. having or showing great eagerness or enthusiasm; "hot for travel"

  19. of a seeker; near to the object sought; "you're getting warm"; "hot on the trail" [syn: warm]

  20. having or dealing with dangerously high levels of radioactivity; "hot fuel rods"; "a hot laboratory"

  21. charged or energized with electricity; "a hot wire"; "a live wire" [syn: live]

  22. marked by excited activity; "a hot week on the stock market"

  23. [also: hottest, hotter]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

hot

Old English hat "hot, flaming, opposite of cold," also "fervent, fierce, intense, excited," from Proto-Germanic *haita- (cognates: Old Saxon and Old Frisian het, Old Norse heitr, Middle Dutch and Dutch heet, German heiß "hot," Gothic heito "heat of a fever"), from PIE root *kai- "heat" (cognates: Lithuanian kaistu "to grow hot").\n

\nThe association of hot with sexuality dates back to c.1500. Taste sense of "pungent, acrid, biting" is from 1540s. Sense of "exciting, remarkable, very good" is 1895; that of "stolen" is first recorded 1925 (originally with overtones of "easily identified and difficult to dispose of"); that of "radioactive" is from 1942.\n

\nHot flashes in the menopausal sense attested from 1887. Hot air "unsubstantiated statements, boastful talk" is from 1900. Hot stuff for anything good or excellent is by 1889. Hot potato in figurative sense is from 1846. The hot and cold in hide-and-seek or guessing games are from hunting (1640s), with notion of tracking a scent.

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "hot".

Stillbirths, abortuses, and placentas are in hot demand at the BLI for the dozen or so groups doing hormone research.

His hot face had leaned forward a little too confidentially and he had assumed a very low Dublin accent, so that the young ladies, with one instinct, received his speech in silence.

Filter off the precipitate and wash with hot water containing a little sodium acetate, dissolve it off the filter with hot dilute hydrochloric acid, add ammonia in excess, and pass sulphuretted hydrogen for five minutes.

The precipitate is filtered quickly through a large filter, and washed with hot water containing a little acetate of soda.

The bed should be warmed after these are administered and the patient given hot lemonade to bring on free action of the skin, kidneys, and bowels.

Hot Grocery Store Man catches my eye just as I approach the adobo seasoning.

He had, in fact, crossed the designs of no less a power than the German Empire, he had blundered into the hot focus of Welt-Politik, he was drifting helplessly towards the great Imperial secret, the immense aeronautic park that had been established at a headlong pace in Franconia to develop silently, swiftly, and on an immense scale the great discoveries of Hunstedt and Stossel, and so to give Germany before all other nations a fleet of airships, the air power and the Empire of the world.

It was the difference between the manners of Tewksbury and Tuscumbia, between being brought up amid the cruelties of the almshouse and the affectionate warmth of an upper-middle-class Southern home, between an Irish cultural heritage of black pessimism and hot hatred of patronizing rulers and the genial, self-confident outlook of a class that despite the Civil War was still master.

His chest was hot and tight, his eyes were afire with the sight of her and his hands ached to touch her splendid face.

In spite of the three air conditioners aft blowing frigid air into the room to help cool the electronics, the space had grown airless and hot.

The two women disappeared behind the afterclap, the canvas screen at the back of the wagon, and Sarah called for the servants to bring the copper hip bath and buckets of hot water from the cooking fire.

Even the succulent blue lilies--a variety of the agapanthus which is so familiar to us in English greenhouses--hung their long trumpet-shaped flowers and looked oppressed and miserable, beneath the burning breath of the hot wind which had been blowing for hours like the draught from a volcano.

Bees wandered among the heliotrope and verbena and pots of sapphire agapanthus, and even that shady place felt the hot breath of the summer noon.

Ten Commandments would go to heaven, Ahere it was very beautiful, while those who sinned would go to hell, where it was very hot.

This lowly Thought, which once would talk with me Of a bright seraph sitting crowned on high, Found such a cruel foe it died, and so My Spirit wept, the grief is hot even now-- And said, Alas for me!