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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

hog

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
memory hog
road hog
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
whole
▪ You could hire taxis, or go the whole hog and hire a chauffeur-driven car for the day.
▪ Mortified by the twist in his sobriety, George decided to go the whole hog and join the Total Abstinence Society.
▪ The Siemens display goes the whole hog.
▪ Taking a deep breath we elected to go the whole hog and print 16 pages.
▪ Are they about kissing, petting or going the whole hog, as one might say?
▪ He reckoned now he was in, he might as well go the whole hog.
▪ And when you've claimed that much land, why not go the whole hog and put a roof over it as well.
▪ Either it gets through completely or it totally fails to do so, the whole hog or nothing.
■ VERB
go
▪ You could hire taxis, or go the whole hog and hire a chauffeur-driven car for the day.
▪ Be outrageous. Go the whole hog.
▪ Mortified by the twist in his sobriety, George decided to go the whole hog and join the Total Abstinence Society.
▪ The Siemens display goes the whole hog.
▪ Taking a deep breath we elected to go the whole hog and print 16 pages.
▪ Are they about kissing, petting or going the whole hog, as one might say?
▪ He reckoned now he was in, he might as well go the whole hog.
▪ And when you've claimed that much land, why not go the whole hog and put a roof over it as well.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
go the whole hog
▪ And when you've claimed that much land, why not go the whole hog and put a roof over it as well.
▪ Are they about kissing, petting or going the whole hog, as one might say?
▪ Brailsford was one of the few popular frontists prepared to go the whole hog and accept this.
▪ He reckoned now he was in, he might as well go the whole hog.
▪ Mortified by the twist in his sobriety, George decided to go the whole hog and join the Total Abstinence Society.
▪ Taking a deep breath we elected to go the whole hog and print 16 pages.
▪ The Siemens display goes the whole hog.
▪ You could hire taxis, or go the whole hog and hire a chauffeur-driven car for the day.
live high on the hog
▪ They've been living high on the hog since Jim got the money from his aunt.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Don't be such a hog.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And a couple of times a year, they would slaughter the hogs or heifers that provided year-round protein.
▪ And when you've claimed that much land, why not go the whole hog and put a roof over it as well.
▪ Ellen, you want to go to the sheep barn or to the hogs?
▪ He shuddered, reminded for some reason of a debris tIed hog.
▪ The lowland races, though, are not much larger than the red river hog.
▪ The Siemens display goes the whole hog.
▪ There was my car, like a mad old hog caught in mid-spasm, its snout and tusks crushed and steaming.
▪ When living high on the corporate hog, you learn to spend as much as possible.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
go the whole hog
▪ And when you've claimed that much land, why not go the whole hog and put a roof over it as well.
▪ Are they about kissing, petting or going the whole hog, as one might say?
▪ Brailsford was one of the few popular frontists prepared to go the whole hog and accept this.
▪ He reckoned now he was in, he might as well go the whole hog.
▪ Mortified by the twist in his sobriety, George decided to go the whole hog and join the Total Abstinence Society.
▪ Taking a deep breath we elected to go the whole hog and print 16 pages.
▪ The Siemens display goes the whole hog.
▪ You could hire taxis, or go the whole hog and hire a chauffeur-driven car for the day.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Mom, Pam's hogging the bathroom again!
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But Hillary keeps hogging those funerals.
▪ Dredge tried to hog the credit, but it's clear to me where it really belongs.
▪ It's just that Diana hogs all the photo opportunities.
▪ She gave him little room on the seat, hogging the middle.
▪ You're presenting a message, not hogging the limelight!
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Hog

Hog \Hog\, v. i. (Naut.) To become bent upward in the middle, like a hog's back; -- said of a ship broken or strained so as to have this form.

Hog

Hog \Hog\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hogged; p. pr. & vb. n. Hogging.]

  1. To cut short like bristles; as, to hog the mane of a horse.
    --Smart.

  2. (Naut.) To scrub with a hog, or scrubbing broom.

Hog

Hog \Hog\ (h[o^]g), n. [Prob. akin to E. hack to cut, and meaning orig., a castrated boar; cf. also W. hwch swine, sow, Armor. houc'h, hoc'h. Cf. Haggis, Hogget, and Hoggerel.]

  1. (Zo["o]l.) A quadruped of the genus Sus, and allied genera of Suid[ae]; esp., the domesticated varieties of Sus scrofa, kept for their fat and meat, called, respectively, lard and pork; swine; porker; specifically, a castrated boar; a barrow.

    Note: The domestic hogs of Siam, China, and parts of Southern Europe, are thought to have been derived from Sus Indicus.

  2. A mean, filthy, or gluttonous fellow. [Low.]

  3. A young sheep that has not been shorn. [Eng.]

  4. (Naut.) A rough, flat scrubbing broom for scrubbing a ship's bottom under water.
    --Totten.

  5. (Paper Manuf.) A device for mixing and stirring the pulp of which paper is made.

    Bush hog, Ground hog, etc.. See under Bush, Ground, etc.

    Hog caterpillar (Zo["o]l.), the larva of the green grapevine sphinx; -- so called because the head and first three segments are much smaller than those behind them, so as to make a resemblance to a hog's snout. See Hawk moth.

    Hog cholera, an epidemic contagious fever of swine, attended by liquid, fetid, diarrhea, and by the appearance on the skin and mucous membrane of spots and patches of a scarlet, purple, or black color. It is fatal in from one to six days, or ends in a slow, uncertain recovery.
    --Law (Farmer's Veter. Adviser.)

    Hog deer (Zo["o]l.), the axis deer.

    Hog gum (Bot.), West Indian tree ( Symphonia globulifera), yielding an aromatic gum.

    Hog of wool, the trade name for the fleece or wool of sheep of the second year.

    Hog peanut (Bot.), a kind of earth pea.

    Hog plum (Bot.), a tropical tree, of the genus Spondias ( Spondias lutea), with fruit somewhat resembling plums, but chiefly eaten by hogs. It is found in the West Indies.

    Hog's bean (Bot.), the plant henbane.

    Hog's bread.(Bot.) See Sow bread.

    Hog's fennel. (Bot.) See under Fennel.

    Mexican hog (Zo["o]l.), the peccary.

    Water hog. (Zo["o]l.) See Capybara.

Wiktionary

hog

n. 1 Any animal belonging to the ''Suidae'' family of mammals, especially the pig, the warthog, and the boar. 2 (lb en specifically) An adult swine (qualifier: contrasted with a pig, a young swine). 3 A greedy person; one who refuses to share. 4 (context slang English) A large motorcycle, particularly a http://en.wikipedi

  1. org/wiki/Harley%20Davidson. 5 (context UK English) A young sheep that has not been shear. 6 (context nautical English) A rough, flat scrubbing broom for scrubbing a ship's bottom under water. 7 A device for mixing and stirring the pulp from which paper is made. 8 (context UK historical archaic slang countable and uncountable English) A shilling coin; its value, 12 old pence. 9 (context UK historical obsolete slang countable & uncountable English) A tanner, a sixpence coin; its value. 10 (context UK historical obsolete slang countable & uncountable English) A half-crown coin; its value, 30 old pence. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To greedily take more than one's share, to take precedence at the expense of another or others. 2 (context transitive English) To clip the mane of a horse, making it short and bristly. 3 (context nautical English) To scrub with a hog, or scrubbing broom. 4 (context transitive nautical English) To cause the keel of a ship to arch upwards (the opposite of (term sag English)).

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

hog

"to appropriate greedily," U.S. slang, 1884 (first attested in "Huck Finn"), from hog (n.). Related: Hogged; hogging.

hog

late 12c. (implied in hogaster), "swine reared for slaughter" (usually about a year old), also used by stockmen for "young sheep" (mid-14c.) and for "horse older than one year," suggesting the original sense had something to do with an age, not a type of animal. Not evidenced in Old English, but it may have existed. Possibility of British Celtic origin [Watkins, etc.] is regarded by OED as "improbable." Figurative sense of "gluttonous person" is first recorded early 15c. Meaning "Harley-Davidson motorcycle" is attested from 1967.\n

\nTo go hog wild is from 1904. Hog in armor "awkward or clumsy person in ill-fitting attire" is from 1650s. Phrase to go the whole hog (1828) is sometimes said to be from the butcher shop option of buying the whole slaughtered animal (at a discount) rather than just the choice bits. But it is perhaps rather from the story (recorded in English from 1779) of Muslim sophists, forbidden by the Quran from eating a certain unnamed part of the hog, who debated which part was intended and managed to exempt the whole of it from the prohibition. Road hog is attested from 1886.

WordNet

hog

  1. n. a person regarded as greedy and pig-like [syn: pig]

  2. a sheep up to the age of one year; one yet to be sheared [syn: hogget, hogg]

  3. domestic swine [syn: pig, grunter, squealer, Sus scrofa]

  4. [also: hogging, hogged]

hog

  1. v. take greedily; take more than one's share

  2. [also: hogging, hogged]

Wikipedia

Hog

Hog may refer to:

Usage examples of "hog".

He squelched through the mud toward the hogs and flung them a bucketful of parsnip peelings and other such delicacies.

Foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, Rift Valley fever, vesicular stomatitis, vesicular exanthema, hog cholera, African swine fever, fowl plague, Newcastle disease, and equine encephalomyelitis.

Your Aunt and Harry Whent to the Wells Races and Spent a very Pleasant Day your Aunt has Lost Old Fanney Sow She Died about a Week a Go Harry he Wanted your Aunt to have her killed and send her to London and Shee Wold Fech her 11 pounds the Farmers have Lost a Greet Deal of Cattel such as Hogs and Cows What theay call the Plage I Whent to your Aunt as you Wish Mee to Do But She Told Mee She Did not wont aney Boddy She Told Mee She Should Like to Come up to see you But She Cant Come know for she is Boddyley ill and Harry Donte Work there know But he Go up there Once in Two or Three Day Harry Offered is self to Go up to Live With your Aunt But She Made him know Ancer.

Monk, although Ham would have let an arm be burned off to the shoulder before he would have admitted of any feeling toward Habeas that was kinder than an intense desire to see breakfast bacon made out of the hog.

The orchard is better for the hens and hogs and cows, and they are better for the orchard.

It is then fit food for hens, hogs, and, in limited quantities, for cows, and is much relished.

We carefully save all wood ashes for the hogs and hens, and we burn our own charcoal in a pit in the wood lot.

The food purchased for cows, hogs, and hens may also be definitely estimated.

The original plan was for a soiling farm on which I could milk thirty cows, fatten two hundred hogs, feed a thousand hens, and wait for thirty-five hundred fruit trees to come to a profitable age.

One storefront they passed had a pair of enormous, hirsute hogs roped to a trough at which they rooted ferociously.

It was the odor of hogs going up to the Ohio heavens--of hogs in a state of transit from hoggish nature to clothes-brushes, saddles, sausages, and lard.

The hog is dressed in a jellaba, a keif pipe juts from its mouth, one hoof holds a packet of feelthy pictures, a mezuzzoth hangs about its neck.

Day was de hardest day of de whole year, for de overseer jus' tried hisself to see how hard he could drive de Niggers dat day, and when de wuk was all done de day ended off wid a big pot of cornfield peas and hog jowl to eat for luck.

In the thick smoke two cooks were frantically yelling at a squad of kitchen maids while the chamberlain himself supervised the carving of a whole hog, and serving lasses and pages dashed around filling baskets with bread and bowls with stewed cabbage.

It was the first of September when Willie and Keefer staggered into the BOQ at four in the morning, full of hog meat and whisky which they had consumed at a hilarious luau arranged by the nurses.