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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

hire

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a hire carBritish English, a rental car American English
▪ We picked up a hire car at the airport.
cycle hire (=hiring a cycle to use)
▪ Cycle hire is available in the town centre.
hire an instrument
▪ You could hire an instrument from a music shop.
hire purchase
hired hand
hire/engage a consultant (=start to employ one)
▪ The company hired an outside consultant to review staffing levels.
hire/engage a lawyer
▪ He’s rich enough to hire a good lawyer.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
boat
▪ Watersports: On the Fuschlsee you can hire electrically-powered boats, rowing boats, pedaloes, and also sail or windsurf.
▪ She tells them that Clive and Alison have hired a boat in Poole.
▪ It was a mournful pair that hired a boat to take them to Saltash and acquaint the Lee family of the tragedy.
▪ The two of us, maybe some others, are going to hire a boat with an outboard motor and perch rods.
car
▪ You could hire taxis, or go the whole hog and hire a chauffeur-driven car for the day.
▪ Tweed's mood changed as soon as they reached Brussels, reserving the suite at the Hilton, hiring the car.
▪ I even manage to hire a car with the credit card, which seems like a blessing.
▪ All drivers must be at least 21 years old to hire a car.
▪ To the Caring Chauvinist's extreme irritation, Daisy took the day off and hired a car.
▪ She'd hired a car a few days before, with the trip to the clinic in view.
▪ He hired a car for the journey because the cottage was difficult to reach any other way.
coach
▪ Usually in May we hire a coach and about 50 of us set off on a 3-day, 2-night hotel stay.
▪ No university wants to hire a coach with a history of lawsuits, a troublemaker, a rocker of boats.
▪ School officials said they planned to hire a new coach by the end of the week.
▪ For $ 42 million, the Patriot should hire his own quarterback coach.
▪ Garrett noted that date as an important factor in hiring a coach.
▪ The situation was resolved when the school hired its new coach.
company
▪ The company had hired a standard Sony digital tape recorder which was hooked to Johnson's own analogue-to-digital conversion system.
▪ The company is looking to hire between 20-30 to work on Airbus wing production.
▪ Such compromise wage settlements protect senior employee wages while allowing these companies to hire new employees at substantially less.
▪ A growing proportion of companies now expect to hire workers from abroad to fill the gaps.
▪ President Clinton issued an order Tuesday barring federal contracts from companies that knowingly hire illegal immigrants.
▪ They could also be ideal locations for bureau services, or just for companies to hire for courses or away-days.
▪ Although many employers prefer candidates to have a degree in business or engineering, some companies hire liberal arts graduates.
employee
▪ He has promised to hire 2,000 new employees to improve customer service over the next six months.
▪ Such compromise wage settlements protect senior employee wages while allowing these companies to hire new employees at substantially less.
▪ One evening, Ralph was talking about hiring an employee.
▪ Airlines there hire extra employees to ask those security questions, speeding up the process.
▪ The legislation gave companies the right to lay off workers and hire temporary employees.
▪ Some organizations change their names as quickly as they hire and fire employees.
fire
▪ He suggested I violently introduce a turnip up my rectum because I no longer have the power to hire or fire anybody.
▪ Some organizations change their names as quickly as they hire and fire employees.
▪ Some encourage tenant councils to hire and fire private management firms.
▪ They need to be able to hire, fire and bring on new resources to respond to carriers like ValuJet.
manager
▪ It hired a competent manager from the private sector, Silvio Pelizzoni, but gave him little power.
▪ They might hire a building manager to coordinate, as does the Empire State Building.
▪ Annie hired a new manager, William A.. Banks, who booked her in a number of state fairs.
money
▪ The formula requires you to spend lots of money and hire well-known actors.
▪ The tribes were forbidden to use any compensatory money they received to hire attorneys.
▪ He had used the money to hire smart clothes for his wedding.
▪ The winners are the private employers who get public money to hire cheap labour.
officer
▪ Foreign mercenaries were hired to officer new-formation regiments into which an increasing number of peasant recruits were drafted.
▪ In fact, they helped pass a half-cent sales tax to hire even more police officers.
▪ Even so, Golding said, her top priority is still hiring more police officers.
▪ The plan will pay for the hiring of 37 probation officers, over three years, to staff the programs.
people
▪ Last year the Institute of Personnel Management warned companies that reluctance to hire older people was inefficient and harmed competitiveness.
▪ It hired a team of people with business experience to aggressively recruit new employers for work-based learning experiences.
▪ In 1979, they were hiring less people, giving jobs to men rather than women.
▪ Can you hire new people instead of changing behaviors and skills of existing people?
▪ We can hire more people and create jobs.
▪ We hire young people without glancing at their high school transcripts and then wonder why they do not work harder in school.
▪ Disney hires these people for their ability not just to draw but also to infuse their characters with personality.
▪ We tried to emphasize a system where you put things in place and hire smart, hard-working people.
staff
▪ And by now there was pressure to hire staff, with the launch date less than six months away.
▪ The new administration has hired much of its staff direct from the industries that backed him.
▪ Several local agencies are planning to hire bilingual staff.
▪ They set the academic tone and they hire teachers and other staff, help them improve their skills, and evaluate them.
▪ Don't tell me he's after hiring new staff.
▪ The CoWorkers responsible for its publication may not hire an office or staff.
▪ The team has control over virtually everything, from maintenance of the building to the curriculum to the hiring of administrative staff.
teacher
▪ School officials treated his response as a refusal to teach and hired another teacher to replace him.
▪ State and local governments hire teachers, bus drivers, police, and firefighters.
▪ The challenge for schools will be hiring enough teachers and finding adequate classroom space to implement the program by next fall.
▪ Can administrators refuse to hire a teacher who participated in disruptions at another school?
▪ Can political affiliation be considered in the hiring of teachers?
▪ They set the academic tone and they hire teachers and other staff, help them improve their skills, and evaluate them.
▪ This year, the district hired 523 certified teachers.
▪ Principals at individual schools could hire those teachers but would have to cut regular classroom positions to do it.
video
▪ Between us we had even hired a video so that we could record this minor miracle of medical history for posterity.
▪ They'd hired a video for tonight, too.
▪ You can hire a video from the village shop to watch with your gourmet meal and bottle of wine.
▪ If you haven't seen it, hire the video.
▪ Some made their excuses and left, muttering about being able to hire a video any time they wanted.
worker
▪ Employers who hire a worker must contact the federal government, which checks to ensure that the new bloke has his papers.
▪ What if they hire all their campaign workers?
▪ It also spent too much on monthly advertising and hired too many workers at high salaries, analysts said.
▪ As irrational as it sounds, many companies hire new workers and then turn around and slash their payrolls.
▪ An executive order to revoke federal contracts of businesses that hire illegal workers.
▪ Labor activists say that although there are no legal age cutoffs, the industries prefer to hire young and malleable workers.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
hired gun
▪ Her coming was more like bringing in a hired gun.
▪ The most free-spending hired guns are all well-known by political mavens inside the Beltway.
▪ This time Bruce Willis is the hired gun in Prohibition-era Texas.
▪ This time Bruce Willis is the hired gun, caught between Chicago gangsters fighting for control of the hooch business.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The Herald newspaper hired her in 1968.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But the bookie was already out hiring frighteners and the bet had to stand.
▪ He hired Tony Pedregon as his second driver.
▪ She has never hired anyone with a business-school education, because she believes such people are too rigid in their outlook.
▪ Should a company employ its own delivery fleet, or should it hire contractors for distribution?
▪ The band may not realize all the costs of recording and of hiring an engineer or producer.
▪ The board, composed of nine presidential appointees, has the power to hire and fire the postmaster general.
▪ There probably never has been a year that employers have knocked down the doors to hire liberal arts graduates.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
available
▪ Following this event the ramps will be available for hire, for either events or youth clubs or whatever.
▪ There are also trout in the lake and boats available for hire.
▪ The range of adaptations possible on a hire purchase car, however, is greater that those available on the hire scheme.
▪ Personal stereo guided tours available for hire.
▪ More available for hire as a venue for Christmas events.
▪ There are many portable types available for hire which simply plug into the 13amp socket.
▪ All are available for private hire during the daytime as well as before, during and after the show.
private
▪ A bilingual poster advertising motor cars for private hire.
▪ Only these taxis should be hailed in the streets. Private hire cars can only carry passengers in response to requests by phone.
▪ Here it is seen on a private hire: Walter Luff is sitting at the back of the saloon.
▪ All are available for private hire during the daytime as well as before, during and after the show.
■ NOUN
car
▪ A mini-bus operates to and from the town three times a day although car hire is recommended for the less energetic.
▪ The car hire people don't know where Lonesome Snapper is either, but they look it up.
▪ Please note that car hire is not bookable on Viewdata.
▪ His portrait still hangs everywhere, from the Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant to the car hire offices.
▪ Unigate's car hire business is also being run down.
▪ These include pursuing a claim for policy excess, car hire charges and loss of the use of one's vehicle.
▪ Please see page 80 for details of car hire.
▪ The price of your fly-drive holiday includes both car hire and hotel accommodation vouchers.
charge
▪ But there's no hire charge of course.
▪ These include pursuing a claim for policy excess, car hire charges and loss of the use of one's vehicle.
▪ He even provides quotations for bearers' and attendants' fittings together with the hire charges for hearses, coaches and horses.
▪ Contract hire charges are revenue expenditure - therefore qualifying for 100 percent tax benefits.
▪ Careful planning of its use will ease hire charges.
company
▪ They had booked a Toyota camper van and told the hire company they intended spending the next three weeks touring New Zealand.
▪ After returning the van to the hire company, I went for a long walk in Hyde Park.
▪ Contact the hire company for advice.
▪ Independent car hire companies are new setting up so ask around.
▪ Car Hire: All major car hire companies at airport.
contract
▪ The container was commissioned on a contract hire agreement with David Robertson Haulage.
▪ They are operated under a contract hire agreement.
▪ It found that more than half of companies now use contract hire compared with only three in 10 during 1991.
firm
▪ The estate is boycotted by hire firms, so they'd been forced to buy a television and washing machine new.
▪ Most hire firms will, however, extend the period of hire, unless the equipment has been promised to some one else.
▪ I offered, but the hire firm do the whole thing.
▪ But they're to concentrate also on car hire firms.
▪ Another group of my agents have toured the car hire firms, using the same tactics.
purchase
▪ There were the hire purchase repayments on the sitting-room furniture and the car, not to mention the mortgage.
▪ This is where goods are taken on hire purchase, credit sale or conditional sale terms.
▪ There are four main methods of funding: cash purchase, bank overdraft, hire purchase and leasing.
▪ The seller must be asked whether any of the fixtures and fittings are subject to hire purchase or loan agreements.
▪ The range of adaptations possible on a hire purchase car, however, is greater that those available on the hire scheme.
▪ And it was all in the days before credit cards, when hire purchase was king.
▪ As to negligence it was true that Moorgate Mercantile had been careless in failing to register their hire purchase agreement.
▪ Nor were hire purchase, conditional or credit sale transactions involving over £2,000.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
ply for hire/trade
▪ A two-in-hand waiting opposite, which Lefevre had assumed to be plying for hire, trotted sedately up to the stage door.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Isaac too had been alerted by the footlocker and wandered over to offer Miss Dec for hire.
▪ Personal stereo guided tours available for hire.
▪ The world's most widely used card is welcomed in hotels and restaurants, for car hire or shopping.
▪ To explore further afield, bicycle hire is available.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Hire

Hire \Hire\ (h[~e]r), pron. [Obs.] See Here, pron.
--Chaucer.

Hire

Hire \Hire\ (h[imac]r), n. [OE. hire, hure, AS. h[=y]r; akin to D. huur, G. heuer, Dan. hyre, Sw. hyra.]

  1. The price, reward, or compensation paid, or contracted to be paid, for the temporary use of a thing or a place, for personal service, or for labor; wages; rent; pay.

    The laborer is worthy of his hire.
    --Luke x. 7.

  2. (Law.) A bailment by which the use of a thing, or the services and labor of a person, are contracted for at a certain price or reward.
    --Story.

    Syn: Wages; salary; stipend; allowance; pay.

Hire

Hire \Hire\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hired (h[imac]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Hiring.] [OE. hiren, huren, AS. h[=y]rian; akin to D. huren, G. heuern, Dan. hyre, Sw. hyra. See Hire, n.]

  1. To procure (any chattel or estate) from another person, for temporary use, for a compensation or equivalent; to purchase the use or enjoyment of for a limited time; as, to hire a farm for a year; to hire money.

  2. To engage or purchase the service, labor, or interest of (any one) for a specific purpose, by payment of wages; as, to hire a servant, an agent, or an advocate.

  3. To grant the temporary use of, for compensation; to engage to give the service of, for a price; to let; to lease; -- now usually with out, and often reflexively; as, he has hired out his horse, or his time.

    They . . . have hired out themselves for bread.
    --1 Sam. ii. 5.

WordNet

hire

  1. v. engage or hire for work; "They hired two new secretaries in the department"; "How many people has she employed?" [syn: engage, employ] [ant: fire]

  2. hold under a lease or rental agreement; of goods and services [syn: rent, charter, lease]

  3. engage for service under a term of contract; "We took an apartment on a quiet street"; "Let's rent a car"; "Shall we take a guide in Rome?" [syn: lease, rent, charter, engage, take]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

hire

Old English hyrian "pay for service, employ for wages, engage," from Proto-Germanic *hurjan (cognates: Danish hyre, Old Frisian hera, Dutch huren, German heuern "to hire, rent"). Reflexively, "to agree to work for wages" from mid-13c. Related: Hired; hiring.

hire

"payment for work, use, or services; wages," from Old English hyr "wages; interest, usury," from Proto-Germanic *hurja- (see hire (v.)).

Wiktionary

hire

n. 1 payment for the temporary use of something. 2 (context obsolete English) reward, payment. 3 The state of being hired, or having a job; employment. 4 A person who has been hired, especially in a cohort. vb. (label en transitive) To obtain the services of in return for fixed payment.

Wikipedia

Hiré

Hiré is a town in southern Ivory Coast. It is a sub-prefecture and commune of Divo Department in Lôh-Djiboua Region, Gôh-Djiboua District.

Usage examples of "hire".

The academician had arranged for the marquis to hire him as a secretary.

Harry smile - this cabby would make a report by telephone to some mysterious personage who had hired him to pick up a passenger outside the Acme Florists.

Castile to bring supplies and people under hire, and at the earliest opportunity to send also his brother, the Adelantado, to prosecute his discovery and find great things, as he hoped they would be found, to serve our Lord and the Sovereigns.

Partly as an example of his opposition to ageism he hired an old woman, Mrs.

He had to hire her on a freelance basis specifically to get the copyright clearances for the album since no one else at NEMS was capable of doing it.

Miss Ames, I think that my father and Hippocrates would never have seen eye to eye on the matter of payment for hire.

He is still alive, and somewhere wearily goes up and down the stairs of strange houses, stares somewhere at clean-scoured parquet floors and carefully tended araucarias, sits for days in libraries and nights in taverns, or lying on a hired sofa, listens to the world beneath his window and the hum of human life from which he knows that he is excluded.

I put the differences between what Roulet had said about my hiring and what Valenzuela had told me into the bank for later consideration and made my way back into the arraignment court.

Roulet had said about my hiring and what Valenzuela had told me into the bank for later consideration and made my way back into the arraignment court.

For the purpose of attending the Exchange, and of becoming acquainted with the language, he hired a lodging in the neighborhood of the city, where he remained for some weeks.

His claim that Zern had hired Peld to import mobsters into Georgia and crack down on the Aureole Mine was an almost outrageous statement.

We were all provided with very comfortable lodgings, but the intensity of the heat induced the baili to seek for a little coolness in a country mansion which had been hired by the Bailo Dona.

He hired land also of a tenant of the Basha, and sent wool and milk by the hand of a neighbour to the market at Tetuan.

Seems like a waste of his time to come looking for Beeker when he could hire a whole team of detectives to do the job for him.

The carnival began the day after my arrival, and I hired a superb landau for the whole week.