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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

hip

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a thigh/hip/ankle etc bone
▪ He was so thin that his hip bones were sticking out.
fracture your leg/arm/hip etc
▪ He fractured his right leg during training.
hip flask
hip hop
hip pocket
knee/neck/hip/elbow etc joint
▪ a permanently damaged knee joint
rose hip
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
artificial
▪ It is the excellent wear characteristics of alumina which are the principal advantage in artificial hip systems.
▪ It is exactly this problem which causes a percentage of artificial hip joint failures.
▪ In much the same way computer simulation has been used in bioengineering in the design of prosthesis such as artificial limbs or hips.
lean
▪ The massive shoulders and chest tapered down to the lean cowboy hips and long legs.
▪ The leotard she wore was a pale yellow Spandex, defining the wide shoulders and lean hips of a gymnast.
▪ When finally he fitted his lean hips into the cradle of hers she was ready for him, impatient for his possession.
narrow
▪ I say, Tash, look at her narrow, narrow hips.
▪ Wide cheeks, the narrow hips of a boy.
▪ Then he leaned back from his narrow hips and hurled the apple directly at Gabriel's head.
▪ So skinny, wasted legs and narrow hips that his genitalia showed gigantic.
▪ Usually Sara saw him as a bronzed, athletic man with a steady gaze, manly features and narrow hips.
▪ The Ectomorph frame is small with narrow shoulders and sometimes even narrower hips.
wide
▪ Never mind, Madeleine always said to the flinching Thérèse: wide hips are best for having babies.
▪ She finished, fluttered her lashes at me and smoothed the corduroy dress over her wide hips.
■ NOUN
replacement
▪ Carrying out the precision drilling in a delicate hip replacement operation is the world's first robotic surgeon.
▪ Robodoc, a mechanical arm with a drill on the end, helped surgeons carry out a complicated hip replacement.
▪ Do our surgical colleagues stop doing total hip replacements for pain because of the incidence of possible fatal embolism?
■ VERB
break
▪ About this time Mrs Foskett slipped on the floor and broke her hip, dying shortly afterwards.
▪ Drinan suffered a concussion, a broken left hip, a broken left foot and a bruised lung in a Saturday crash.
▪ On the other hand, if I did slip and break my hip I should no doubt be dead by the morning.
▪ Only about a third of those who have surgery for broken hips regain the same level of activity as before the fracture.
▪ Immediately Buzz knew she'd broken her hip.
▪ Is that what you tell your patients, to go dancing and gallivanting around just after breaking a hip?
▪ He broke his hip whilst hunting and the poor man walked with a limp from then on.
shoot
▪ Because I was experiencing shooting sensations around my hips, the doctor was convinced I had a back problem.
▪ Bolinger, a Harvard Professor shoots from the hip.
▪ Still rolling, Forster shot from the hip.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be joined at the hip
knee/hip/joint replacement
▪ A prosthesis used in a joint replacement costs between $ 5,000 and $ 10,000.
▪ Carrying out the precision drilling in a delicate hip replacement operation is the world's first robotic surgeon.
▪ For those over 65, it is knee or hip replacement.
▪ I had been having trouble with arthritis for years, and nine years ago had a hip replacement.
▪ Just two months ago, he underwent bowel and hip replacement surgery that cost $ 120, 000.
▪ One person's hip replacement operation certainly prevents the busy surgeon from doing something else at the same time.
▪ She has undergone three hip replacement surgeries in the last three years.
▪ With 40,000 hip replacements a year, making joints is big business, now mostly done by multi-nationals companies.
shoot from the hip
▪ Bolinger, a Harvard Professor shoots from the hip.
▪ He saw himself shooting from the hip.
▪ Still rolling, Forster shot from the hip.
▪ Students were content to shoot from the hip, as Ronen Wilk had put it.
▪ They walk into rooms and shoot from the hip.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Check that you are in a square position with your hands directly under your shoulders and your knees under your hips.
▪ Harriet met them at the edge of the yard with her hands on her hips.
▪ If Christmas has settled on your hips and middle, it's time to act.
▪ Mrs Fanning rolled her hips in a droll way like some one trying to keep up a Hula-Hoop.
▪ Now reverse it - right hand behind your head, left hand on hip and lean to your left.
▪ She had shredded the thing with her hips.
▪ The leotard she wore was a pale yellow Spandex, defining the wide shoulders and lean hips of a gymnast.
▪ The physiotherapist controls the patient's balance reactions by maintaining control of the patient's hip and knee.
II.adjective
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I hate old people who dress like teenagers and think they're hip.
▪ It's really funny when Dad tries to be hip.
▪ The South Side is becoming a really hip place to live.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But I plan over the next year to completely renew my rig; there are just too many hip new things.
▪ But Route 66 shows that nostalgia is positively hip.
▪ This attitude is defiantly hip and belligerently contemporary.
Wikipedia

Hip (disambiguation)

The hip is an anatomical region and a joint.

Hip or HIP may also refer to:

Hip

In vertebrate anatomy, hip (or "coxa" in medical terminology) refers to either an anatomical region or a joint.

The hip region is located lateral and anterior to the gluteal region (i.e., the buttock), inferior to the iliac crest, and overlying the greater trochanter of the femur, or "thigh bone". In adults, three of the bones of the pelvis have fused into the hip bone or acetabulum which forms part of the hip region.

The hip joint, scientifically referred to as the acetabulofemoral joint (art. coxae), is the joint between the femur and acetabulum of the pelvis and its primary function is to support the weight of the body in both static (e.g. standing) and dynamic (e.g. walking or running) postures. The hip joints are the most important part in retaining balance. The pelvic inclination angle, which is the single most important element of human body posture, is mostly adjusted at the hips.

Pain of the hip may be the result of numerous causes including nervous, osteoarthritic, infectious, trauma-related, and genetic ones.

Hip (slang)

Hip is a slang term sometimes defined as fashionably current, and in the know. It has also been defined as "an attitude, a stance" in opposition to the "unfree world", or to what is square, or prude.

Hip, like cool, does not refer to one specific quality. What is considered hip is continuously changing.

Hip (album)

Hip is the only full-length release by the band Steppeulvene, a Danish rock band. It was released in 1967.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

hip

"part of the body where pelvis and thigh join," Old English hype "hip," from Proto-Germanic *hupiz (cognates: Dutch heup, German Hüfte, Gothic hups "hip"), from PIE *qeub- "to bend." Hip of a roof is from late 17c.

hip

"seed pod" (especially of wild rose), Old English heope, hiope "seed vessel of the wild rose," from Proto-Germanic *hiup- (cognates: dialectal Norwegian hjupa, Old Saxon hiopo, Dutch joop, Old High German hiafo, dialectal German Hiefe, Old English hiopa "briar, bramble").

hip

"informed," 1904, apparently originally in black slang, probably a variant of hep (1), with which it is identical in sense, though it is recorded four years earlier.

hip

exclamation used to introduce a united cheer (compare hip-hip-hurrah), 1827, earlier hep; compare German hepp, to animals a cry to attack game, to mobs a cry to attack Jews (see hep (2)); perhaps a natural sound (such as Latin eho, heus).

Wiktionary

hip

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context anatomy English) The outward-projecting parts of the pelvis and top of the femur and the overlying tissue. 2 The inclined external angle formed by the intersection of two sloping roof planes. 3 In a bridge truss, the place where an inclined end post meets the top chord. vb. 1 (context chiefly sports English) To use one's hips to bump into someone. 2 To throw (one's adversary) over one's hip in wrestling (technically called ''cross buttock''). 3 To dislocate or sprain the hip of, to fracture or injure the hip bone of (a quadruped) in such a manner as to produce a permanent depression of that side. 4 To make with a hip or hips, as a roof. Etymology 2

n. The fruit of a rose. Etymology 3

  1. (context slang English) aware, informed, up-to-date, trendy (from early 20th c., popularized in 1960s) v

  2. (context transitive slang English) To inform, to make knowledgeable.

WordNet

hip

  1. n. either side of the body below the waist and above the thigh

  2. the structure of the vertebrate skeleton supporting the lower limbs in humans and the hind limbs or corresponding parts in other vertebrates [syn: pelvis, pelvic girdle, pelvic arch]

  3. the ball-and-socket joint between the head of the femur and the acetabulum [syn: hip joint, coxa, articulatio coxae]

  4. the fruit of a rose plant [syn: rose hip, rosehip]

  5. [also: hippest, hipper]

hip

  1. adj. informed about the latest trends [syn: hep, hip to(p)]

  2. [also: hippest, hipper]

The Collaborative International Dictionary

hip

hip \hip\, a.

  1. Aware of the latest ideas, trends, fashions, and developments in popular music and entertainment culture; not square; -- same as hep.

    Syn: tuned in.

  2. Aware of the latest fashions and behaving as expected socially, especially in clothing style and musical taste; exhibiting an air of casual sophistication; cool; with it; -- used mostly among young people in the teens to twenties.

Usage examples of "hip".

His real mission, of course, is to convince some other band, somewhere else, that he is a genius acoustician who has developed the ultimate amplifier and that Doggone amps are the only amps that any hip band can possibly consider.

As Addle poured him a glass of juice, he slipped his arm around her hips, as if it were the most natural thing in the world.

Honorius the afrit leaped upon the bonnet of the car, femurs akimbo, hands on hip bones, skull cocked at a jaunty angle.

The two women disappeared behind the afterclap, the canvas screen at the back of the wagon, and Sarah called for the servants to bring the copper hip bath and buckets of hot water from the cooking fire.

Seregil paid his price without quibbling and Maklin threw in a sword belt, showing Alec how to wrap it twice around his waist 63 and fix the lacings so that the blade hung at the proper angle against his left hip.

A long, tall flagon of amberjack was in her hand, and a slim long sword at her hip.

Her slender figure, her prominent hips, her beautifully-modelled bosom, her large eyes, from which flashed the sparkle of amorous desire, everything about her was strikingly beautiful, and presented to my hungry looks the perfection of the mother of love, adorned by all the charms which modesty throws over the attractions of a lovely woman.

She glared at him with her hands on her hips, her mouth set irritably aslant upward, her eyebrows gathered into a dark knot over her nose.

After an extensive tussle, punctuated by whoops, giggles and female screams, the predictable result was obtained with Avis straddling his face, Eris his hips.

He felt the devil was slipping hip wiggling and bebop rhythms into gospel, tempting groups and luring good Christians away from the Lord with the idea of making a fast buck.

Lily Bede stood a foot behind him, hand on hips, spots of carnelian edging each cheekbone.

Strange was coming out of a massage parlor when he felt his beeper vibrate against his hip.

As he was crossing the street, the beeper on his hip sounded, and he checked the numbered readout: Janine.

I smoothed my hands down my lightweight gauze ruffly, beflounced broomstick skirt, wondering if Tiffany was being catty or if my hips did, in fact, look so massive she had to give me a gentle pointer.

It was loosely lashed about her waist with a behen, a long woolen sash wrapped above her hips.