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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

highly

adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
acutely/highly embarrassed (=extremely embarrassed)
▪ The government must be acutely embarrassed by the minister’s behaviour.
densely/heavily/highly/thickly populated (=with a lot of people)
▪ one of the most densely populated areas in the world
extremely/highly effective
▪ The company launched a highly effective advertising campaign.
extremely/highly efficient
▪ The factory is modern and highly efficient.
extremely/highly/fairly etc flexible
▪ Our new computer software is extremely flexible.
greatly/highly exaggerated (=by a large amount)
▪ The union put the figure at 5,000, but we believe this has been greatly exaggerated.
highly addictive
▪ Tobacco is highly addictive.
highly ambitious (=who want their children to be successful)
▪ mothers who are highly ambitious for their children
highly amused (=very amused)
▪ I could see she was highly amused .
highly amusing (=very amusing)
▪ a highly amusing film
highly articulate
▪ a highly articulate speaker
highly automated
▪ a highly automated factory
highly beneficial
▪ Cycling is highly beneficial to health and the environment.
highly characteristic (=very typical)
▪ the highly characteristic flint walls of the local houses
highly charged
▪ a highly charged debate
highly commendable
▪ Your enthusiasm is highly commendable.
highly commended
▪ The paper was highly commended in the UK Press Awards.
highly complex
▪ Photosynthesis is a highly complex process.
highly controversial
▪ This policy is highly controversial.
highly critical
▪ He made some highly critical remarks.
highly cultivated
▪ a highly cultivated man
highly desirable
▪ The ability to speak a foreign language is highly desirable.
highly developed
▪ Dogs have a highly developed sense of smell.
highly dubious
▪ The assumption that growth in one country benefits the whole world is highly dubious.
highly educated
▪ a highly educated woman
highly esteemed
highly esteemed scholars
highly exceptional (=extremely exceptional)
▪ A loan of this size is highly exceptional.
highly explosive
▪ Because the gas is highly explosive, it needs to be kept in high-pressure containers.
Highly flammable
▪ Caution! Highly flammable liquid.
highly illegal (=completely illegal )
▪ It all sounds highly illegal.
highly improbable
▪ It seems highly improbable that he had no knowledge of the affair.
highly infectious
▪ Flu is highly infectious.
highly inflammable
▪ Petrol is highly inflammable.
highly influential
▪ a highly influential art magazine
highly intelligent (=very intelligent)
▪ a group of highly intelligent students
highly irregular (=extremely irregular)
▪ It would be highly irregular for a minister to accept payments of this kind.
highly mechanized
▪ Car production is now highly mechanized.
highly mobile (=very mobile)
▪ We now live in a highly mobile society.
highly motivated
▪ The students are all highly motivated.
highly nutritious
▪ The cookbook contains many simple yet highly nutritious meals.
highly organized (=well-organized)
▪ a highly organized social system
highly original
▪ a highly original design
highly partisan
▪ British newspapers are highly partisan.
highly politicized
▪ Abortion is a highly politicized issue.
highly popular (=extremely popular)
▪ a highly popular radio station
highly praised
▪ a highly praised novel
highly prestigious
▪ a highly prestigious university
highly priced (=expensive)
▪ The clothes shops all seemed to be full of highly priced designer clothes.
highly prized
▪ The company’s shoes are highly prized by fashion conscious youngsters.
highly probable
▪ Success is highly probable.
highly problematic
▪ The reforms could turn out to be highly problematic.
highly productive
▪ a highly productive meeting
highly profitable
▪ a highly profitable business
highly qualified
▪ All the other applicants seemed highly qualified.
highly qualified
▪ The pilots who fly these planes are highly qualified.
highly questionable
▪ The statistics are highly questionable.
highly radioactive
▪ a consignment of highly radioactive plutonium
highly recommend
▪ This book is highly recommended by those who have used it.
highly regarded (=regarded as very good)
▪ His work is highly regarded by art experts.
highly responsive
▪ a car with highly responsive steering
highly seasoned
▪ a highly seasoned piece of fish
highly sensitive
▪ a highly sensitive electronic camera
highly sensitive
highly sensitive information
highly significant
▪ The result is highly significant for the future of the province.
highly skilled
▪ The company is fortunate to have such highly skilled workers.
highly sophisticated
▪ a highly sophisticated weapons system
highly specialized
▪ the highly specialized plants that live in desert areas
highly structured
▪ The interviews were highly structured.
highly subjective
▪ a highly subjective point of view
highly successful (=very successful)
▪ Arthur was a highly successful businessman.
highly successful (=very successful)
▪ a highly successful product
highly successful (=very successful)
▪ a highly successful meeting
highly suspect
▪ The company was involved in some highly suspect business dealings.
highly suspect
▪ The two men were convicted on the basis of some highly suspect evidence.
highly suspicious
▪ He was behaving in a highly suspicious manner.
highly toxic
▪ a highly toxic pesticide
highly trained
▪ a highly trained workforce
highly variable
▪ Interest rates can be highly variable.
highly visible
▪ Cyclists should wear highly visible colours.
highly volatile
▪ the highly volatile stock and bond markets
highly/deeply sceptical
▪ He is highly sceptical of the reforms.
highly/entirely/wholly appropriate
▪ I thought his remark was highly appropriate, given the circumstances.
highly/fiercely/intensely etc competitive
▪ Advertising is an intensely competitive business.
highly/greatly respected
▪ The author is a highly respected historian.
highly/intensely active
▪ an intensely active child
highly/most/very unlikely
▪ It’s highly unlikely that he’ll survive.
highly/purely/largely speculative
▪ a purely speculative theory about life on other planets
highly/very accomplished
▪ a highly accomplished designer
highly/very dangerous
▪ it was a highly dangerous situation.
highly/widely/universally acclaimed
▪ The book has been widely acclaimed by teachers and pupils.
much/highly sought-after
▪ a much sought-after defense lawyer
rate...highly (=think he is very good)
▪ The company seems to rate him very highly.
seriously/highly/grossly etc misleading
▪ These figures are highly misleading.
speak well/highly of sb (=say good things about them)
▪ He always spoke very highly of Marge.
totally/highly/completely etc irresponsible
▪ When it comes to money, Dan is completely irresponsible.
very/deeply/highly unpopular
▪ This bill is deeply unpopular with the rest of the Republican establishment.
very/extremely/immensely/highly etc complicated
▪ Mental illness is a very complicated subject.
very/highly suitable (also eminently suitableformal)
▪ This exercise is very suitable for back pain sufferers.
very/highly/eminently readable
▪ The book is informative and highly readable.
very/highly/extremely competent
▪ She’s a highly competent linguist.
very/highly/extremely likely
▪ It did not seem very likely that he was still alive.
very/highly/extremely suggestible
▪ At that age, kids are highly suggestible.
very/highly/most satisfactory
▪ After her initial difficulties she has made a very satisfactory recovery.
very/most/highly unusual
▪ Gandhi was a most unusual politician.
well/widely/highly publicized (=receiving a lot of attention)
▪ His visit was highly publicized.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
competent
▪ Transformation of highly competent E.coli cells with the ligation mixture gave rise to one Ap R clone.
▪ All three were highly competent, but their ambitions overrode their talent.
▪ He was a skilled and artistic weaver ... A highly competent woodworker ... A good herdsman ... A fine farmer ....
competitive
▪ He guided her through a leading fashion school and she established herself in a highly competitive industry.
▪ Advancement to supervisory positions is highly competitive.
▪ What's more, we offer you the height of luxury at highly competitive prices.
▪ Overall processing costs are highly competitive with other existing, environmentally acceptable technologies.
▪ They were highly competitive, didn't belong to trade unions and lacked any notion of worker solidarity.
▪ Other Areas are in the throes of heavy training schedules and will create a highly competitive spirit in Portlaoise.
▪ Among the maharajas tiger shooting became highly competitive.
▪ A.R. Getting into drama school is highly competitive and requires an audition and interview.
complex
▪ However, most of these methods paid insufficient attention to the highly complex nature of landscape values, while overemphasizing scenic attractiveness.
▪ But the components for Worldwide Plaza were already highly complex when they arrived on site.
▪ Social psychology is clearly another large and highly complex topic.
▪ The Aborigines have a highly complex civilization, one that has existed for 60, 000 years.
▪ The establishment of a new political system based on law was a highly complex matter and needed careful consideration, he said.
▪ Technology transfer is highly complex and often misunderstood.
▪ Rather, it reflects the need for different conceptualizations to cover the different dimensions of a highly complex phenomenon.
▪ Yet beer - good beer - is a highly complex product and one that arguably needs greater skill to produce than wine.
controversial
▪ The Public Order Act was a necessary but highly controversial piece of legislation.
▪ The ambassadorial nominations were highly controversial at the time.
▪ Suranyi's effective dismissal was highly controversial.
▪ The book was highly controversial and sold unbelievably well.
▪ How changes in money supply affect aggregate demand is a highly controversial issue.
▪ Many of these were highly political, some also highly controversial.
▪ The trial of Shbeilat and Qarrash had been highly controversial.
▪ The result was a highly controversial draw, most ringside commentators agreeing that Hope deserved victory.
critical
▪ There has recently been some highly critical re-assessment of the claims initially made by ape language experimenters on behalf of their subjects.
▪ In fact, four years ago Clinton was highly critical of federal policies originated and implemented by George Bush.
▪ He was highly critical of the use of private houses for Government Offices.
▪ He would shuffle around in his seat and then be highly critical, but he always knew what was going on.
▪ The Bill's initial popularity began to wane after an intense media barrage of highly critical commercials.
▪ Chomsky is therefore highly critical of the way in which Skinner uses operant terminology to account for language.
dangerous
▪ It's meant for children with growth problems, and can be highly dangerous if misused.
▪ This is a highly dangerous trend, because there is no telling where it will end.
▪ It would be highly dangerous if we had the choice of tampering with instinct.
▪ For the Ego, it is highly dangerous to get too close to anyone.
▪ Even outside a nuclear weapon it is a highly dangerous substance - fatal to humans if ingested in even minute quantities.
▪ That kind of knowledge could be highly dangerous, and she would do just about anything to keep it from him.
▪ Each of the three seems to be highly dangerous.
▪ The manoeuvre he had planned was highly dangerous and quite illegal.
desirable
▪ Pure white cotton is, however, highly desirable for the evening.
▪ Only 28 percent rated a video on-demand service as highly desirable.
▪ Other authorities have held back before embarking on such highly desirable projects because of that uncertainty in the law.
▪ Moreover, the news audience is a highly desirable one.
▪ I regard that form of protection as highly desirable and an important part of our proposals.
▪ Now it has just been seen that the laws of physics are efficiently ordered so as to produce highly desirable states.
▪ It is highly desirable that from every product in regular production, samples be withdrawn periodically and put on long-term stability test.
▪ But it was highly desirable from the point of view of the individual soldiers on both sides.
effective
▪ It is well targeted and highly effective.
▪ This drug is highly effective when used within the first several hours after the onset of acute arthritis.
▪ Both vaccines are highly effective and safe.
▪ He will have a reduced role, but a highly effective one.
▪ We need spies because Soviet security is highly effective.
▪ The defense was highly effective in the first half, as Stanford shot 30. 4 percent.
▪ Gold salts are highly effective in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, most adverse reactions being mild and reversible.
▪ Griffiths' solutions were radical but, potentially, highly effective.
efficient
▪ Culturing microorganisms offers a highly efficient means of producing high-protein food supplements for a hungry world of the future.
▪ They are highly efficient and especially adroit at cutting out excessive steps and cumbersome procedures.
▪ Though this makes many passengers change aeroplanes, it is highly efficient for the airlines themselves.
▪ It was unlikely that this highly efficient virus would carry any superfluous baggage.
▪ Law was a highly efficient, rather unimaginative, detailed administrator, given political force by a strong sense of partisan combativeness.
▪ They know him only as a highly efficient and exacting captain.
▪ These national breeding programmes are highly efficient and successful but the diversity has been lost.
▪ We offer: advice about trading partners, finance shaped to your requirements and highly efficient payment and collection systems.
improbable
▪ The fact that highly improbable circumstances could result in significant upside potential should not affect the presentation.
▪ Indeed, it makes such an occurrence very highly improbable.
▪ This would be a highly improbable conclusion.
▪ Therefore the existence of a universe as stable as this is highly improbable.
▪ It is therefore highly improbable if not impossible that recent damage to a roof would have caused rot in underlying timbers.
▪ But it is still highly improbable, a fluke of nature, not a predictable outcome.
▪ Frankly, this seems highly improbable.
▪ It is all truly amazing, and highly improbable, given all the ways the system could break down.
influential
▪ In this respect no figure is more characteristic of the twentieth century than the highly influential economist John Maynard Keynes.
▪ Through the Pattens, Joe met many new friends, some highly influential, others merely famous.
▪ Marxist - Leninist ideas became highly influential among the intelligentsia in the 1920s and have remained so ever since.
▪ The ie has ceased to exist as a legal entity, but the family unit has remained highly influential.
intelligent
▪ Baboons are highly intelligent animals and learn to satisfy their biological needs in many often diverse ways.
▪ A highly intelligent, highly motivated, and extremely personable young woman, Crystal has had numerous supports along the way.
▪ Now as then, Gielgud is acute, highly intelligent and concerned to help draw a full portrait.
▪ City Hall insiders described Cruz as highly intelligent and ultrasensitive to minority issues.
▪ Alix seemed to her to be both practical and highly intelligent.
▪ By the time she was ready to go, this highly intelligent and capable woman spoke the language fluently.
▪ First, that rugby players are a highly intelligent, dedicated and wise bunch.
▪ He was 24, highly intelligent, could drink Malc under the table and had a dry, lightning wit.
likely
▪ It seems highly likely that this contributes to their increased risk of infection.
▪ This sequence is not inevitable, but is highly likely to occur eventually unless adequate steps are taken to prevent it.
▪ It seems highly likely that most if not all the beer produced in Brick Lane by now was porter.
▪ Indeed, it seems highly likely that working-class families would have controlled family size through the old, rather than new, techniques.
▪ A survey will be carried out of sewage disposal systems and it is highly likely that major expenditure will be necessary.
original
▪ He learnt the lesson well, and has since produced an impressive and highly original body of work.
▪ In a highly original twist, the game allows you to determine the moral caliber of the hero.
▪ A fine revival of a highly original piece of music theatre.
▪ Blackwell glossed reproduction in a highly original way, fusing it with claims for an active female sexuality.
▪ For instance, they created highly original relief panels to decorate the Sebasteion as well as other sculpture that adapted earlier models for different purposes.
▪ Wallis made a small but highly original contribution to the art and connoisseurship of his time.
▪ An older repaint over a highly original car, this interesting specification Rover 2000 would respond well to careful detailing.
popular
▪ Newsgroups are also highly popular as a means of tracing family members who may have fled conflict or natural disaster.
▪ Once highly popular, his ratings in the polls sometimes dropped into single digits.
▪ An example is the once highly popular low-carbohydrate method of slimming.
▪ President Hashemi Rafsanjani, a highly popular figure, chose not to run again.
▪ PERRIER-JOUET Good consistent quality wines produced by this mainstream highly popular house.
▪ And the booklets costing $ 5. 95 are also highly popular.
▪ These courses proved highly popular with our lads and there was practically a hundred percent pass rate.
▪ And Stewart was highly popular among his peers.
probable
▪ There is no record of Osbald's parentage but a Bernician extraction seems highly probable.
▪ But the generality and power can vary from the local and tentative to the universal and highly probable.
▪ It is highly probable that book provision and use will be a significant component in such inspections.
▪ It is highly probable that many of those in the initial cohort of patients would have died.
productive
▪ Tokugawa agriculture was highly productive, and the amount levied in tax suggests that production was well above subsistence level.
▪ At one time this was a highly productive dairy region-30 ranches-one of the biggest in the country.
▪ And, work-wise, it proved to be a highly productive fortnight.
▪ Longwall mining is a highly mechanized and highly productive method of underground mining.
▪ The use of highly productive equipment means that bonus cut-off can be achieved with ease.
▪ So one could go on to many other sociologists who have been highly productive during their careers.
▪ As we move into a well-fed and highly productive era, new diseases transmitted through our food are regularly emerging.
▪ This might be high if workers were scarce or highly productive and low if they were redundant or incompetent.
profitable
▪ Slavery is, then, under certain conditions, a highly profitable system of exploitation.
▪ But they found no trace of the highly profitable illegal cargo that it was supposed to be carrying.
▪ Co. in San Francisco said oil companies had been expected to turn in a highly profitable quarter.
▪ The aim is to produce beers that are sterile, have a long shelf life and are highly profitable.
▪ Tuft denies Catania's contentions, although he concedes the company borrows heavily and is not highly profitable.
▪ The venture was an immediate and highly profitable success in the years between the Wars.
▪ If you are seeking a highly profitable instant business, you will probably be disappointed-it does not exist.
questionable
▪ Whether that is so in other societies, which is highly questionable, is irrelevant.
▪ However, she makes two highly questionable assumptions that must be challenged.
▪ In fact, it is highly questionable whether the royal use of these powers had been illegal.
▪ Such a view seems highly questionable.
▪ To most people today the prophecy about the second coming seems deranged and the other about everlasting life highly questionable.
▪ These are, however, highly questionable principles in the moral and practical minefield of child care policy.
▪ The cogency of this prescriptive analysis is highly questionable.
▪ Now, it happens that is a very controversial and highly questionable economic proposition.
radioactive
▪ Finding ways of soothing political opposition to the dumping of highly radioactive waste could prove more difficult than solving the scientific problems.
▪ The third isotope of hydrogen, hydrogen-3 or tritium, is highly radioactive and has a very short half-life.
▪ A Green Party spokesman said that spent fuel rods are highly radioactive and potentially lethal.
▪ Fuel rods typically last from two to six years and are highly radioactive.
▪ This is because higher level waste is initially rich in short-lived isotopes which are highly radioactive.
▪ The residual plutonium is apparently being held in the form of highly radioactive waste.
▪ The process leaves behind a highly radioactive liquor as a waste product.
▪ In its native state it is a mixture of highly radioactive uranium-235 and less active U-238.
readable
▪ In common with Boyd's previous works the text is authoritative while at the same time highly readable.
▪ Fascinating and highly readable, this book will satisfy scholars as well as more casual readers.
▪ The Intimate Machine raises many issues concerning the social impact of computers in an invigorating and highly readable manner.
▪ This highly readable account deserves a wide audience and should provoke serious debate.
▪ A well researched, highly readable account of the debt crisis.
▪ Impassioned, angry, funny, highly readable.
▪ The result is absorbing and highly readable.
▪ As anyone who had heard Professor Jennings lecture will expect, the style is highly readable as well as informative.
relevant
▪ The prognosis of the condition is highly relevant since it may indicate increasing difficulty in using printed material.
▪ All these would now become highly relevant issues.
▪ Yet for all that, Reagan was not without experience highly relevant to the demands of executive leadership in the 1980s.
▪ The latter are highly relevant to the debate in progress.
▪ In this respect, voluntary codes of practice applied in a particular trade are highly relevant.
▪ Consider the following interesting, and highly relevant, case.
▪ The Secretary of State is also prone to make pronouncements which can be highly relevant, especially on appeal.
▪ Detailed records about what social workers have established may be highly relevant here.
selective
▪ It is inevitably highly selective, both in the Acts it covers and in what it includes from each Act.
▪ But memory is highly selective, particularly within an organization that has weathered numerous crises and moments of extreme duress.
▪ Perhaps it is Upjohn that is being highly selective regarding evidence on serious psychiatric reactions to triazolam.
▪ These leaders need to recognize the need to be highly selective about what to incorporate into their operations.
▪ What an animal learns is highly selective and highly ordered.
▪ The virus proved highly selective in killing several lines of human cancer cells in laboratory cell cultures.
▪ In any event, we are highly selective about blanket sanctions.
▪ Compatibility is crucial, so the process is highly selective.
sensitive
▪ It can not be stressed too heavily that taking tissue samples was a highly sensitive matter.
▪ Managers need to handle highly sensitive direct contacts with clients.
▪ Such a condition also makes living organisms highly sensitive to their environment, reflecting the characteristics of mind and consciousness themselves.
▪ Unlike the highly sensitive child, the defiant child has some physical characteristics that make a more aggressive approach possible.
▪ He seems highly sensitive to criticism in the press.
▪ Parents can help such highly sensitive children by showing them how to soothe themselves.
▪ For Tod is highly sensitive to this material.
▪ The book touches a highly sensitive chord.
significant
▪ It was a highly significant one.
▪ Because most of the data in this world is inexact, this characteristic becomes highly significant.
▪ Nevertheless, national security issues and the incidence of military conflict remain highly significant.
▪ We see birth as highly significant, but not as an isolated experience.
▪ Although these are mostly non-Anglican in a land where only 2.5% of Christians are Episcopalian, they are highly significant.
▪ Those who later gave birth to sons averaged 2. 26, a highly significant difference.
▪ The officer in charge of the case says it was a highly significant find.
▪ This is highly significant for understanding the nature of his perceived relationship to his government.
skilled
▪ How is this possible if the art of persuasion is such a highly skilled task?
▪ The most highly skilled soldiers advocated rapid maneuver and quick assault when contact was made.
▪ These surveys are invariably undertaken by specialist research organizations, since the construction and administration of questionnaires is a highly skilled operation.
▪ Keeping highly skilled sailors in the Navy also is a challenge.
▪ Pattern making is a highly skilled occupation and patterns can be extremely expensive to produce.
▪ Highly motivated and highly skilled individuals will prosper in this environment.
▪ As a result, in many countries, the wage gap between lowly and highly skilled workers has widened sharply.
▪ Its goal was to create a highly skilled workforce for the Susquehanna Valley, where P &038; G is located.
sophisticated
▪ A highly sophisticated and well-read composer such as Britten could be expected to look for his own Hofmannsthal.
▪ Some of these are highly sophisticated and provide almost complete control of the duty cycle over a 100 percent variation.
▪ They are highly sophisticated, crammed with electronics, and often carry their own helicopter.
▪ However, the emplacement vessel or platform would need to be highly sophisticated - perhaps a larger version of the Glomar Explorer.
▪ For more exotic dinner parties this one, or at least for those of a highly sophisticated and refined palette!
▪ Between them, those cells produce a highly sophisticated and intricate attack upon the source of infection.
▪ They're highly sophisticated infra-red beams, virtually undetectable to the naked eye.
▪ Dealers have been showered with complaints about this highly sophisticated piece of equipment which has apparently developed a serious fault.
specific
▪ Where psychology does produce theories, they are highly specific to particular debates.
▪ This is the basis of a highly specific method for the measurement of blood glucose.
▪ There was much use of natural materials, and craftsmen expected like medieval masons to be given general rather than highly specific directions.
▪ These cowards practice randomness in highly specific places.
▪ Fourth thesis: Higher education is open whereas research is closed Research is highly specific.
▪ Inpart, this is because of the shortcomings of that highly specific subject framework.
▪ This provides strong evidence that the hybridization signals obtained are highly specific and due to the transfected plasmid.
▪ The name can convey a highly specific meaning or less than nothing, depending on your audience.
speculative
▪ All three approaches were highly speculative.
▪ Federally insured thrifts that traditionally had limited their investments to home mortgages began bingeing on highly speculative investments.
▪ The savings figure, then, is highly speculative, but it is certainly good publicity for the department.
▪ The programme of explaining characteristics of dominant life-forms in terms simply of survival value is controversial and highly speculative.
▪ This, however, is highly speculative and largely dependent on a perpetual bull market.
▪ Or he may simply be taking a highly speculative position.
▪ Here are the real facts: Crane Holdings was in fact a highly speculative investment which in the event performed very badly.
subjective
▪ Reactions can therefore be highly subjective and we may find ourselves disagreeing strongly with what the artist is saying.
▪ Evaluative core beliefs, however, are often highly subjective.
▪ Each year, a decision is taken, often on a highly subjective basis, on our continuing worth.
▪ Data on the market value of autos and houses can be highly subjective.
▪ In the final analysis a judgement on the political stability of most countries must be highly subjective.
▪ Secondly, many of the symptoms produced are highly subjective - headache, confusion or nausea, for example.
▪ To start the Christmas debate, the following are highly subjective and totally personal suggestions.
▪ However, this is a highly subjective area in which the rules themselves can only be guiding principles.
successful
▪ There's a highly successful advertising executive, once handsome and athletic, now eaten away and ravaged.
▪ He continued to pursue photography after his stint in the military, eventually becoming a highly successful commercial photographer.
▪ It's a highly successful business.
▪ We are trying to build machines that draw upon the highly successful designs used in biology.
▪ To her career as an actress, the always practical Lillie now added another: that of a highly successful racehorse owner.
▪ I know a highly successful radiologist who has always dreamed of being a singer, but he has no voice.
▪ This proved a highly successful practical joke.
▪ This stretch of water close to Phoenix has proved to be a highly successful put-and-take fishery from a recreation standpoint.
suspicious
▪ Obviously he behaved in a highly suspicious manner today, but a guilty conscience can inspire one to do strange things.
▪ The one on the rock looked over slowly, highly suspicious.
▪ He found two types, the highly suspicious and the willing business partners.
▪ She thinks he's a highly suspicious character.
▪ She thinks Alexander is a highly suspicious character, although that wouldn't require any great acumen on anyone's part.
▪ All the members are highly suspicious.
▪ We don't know him, we don't trust him and we think he's a highly suspicious character.
▪ Volunteering a wager was unprecedented, therefore highly suspicious.
toxic
▪ Liver damage is known to occur when the breakdown product of a chemical is highly toxic.
▪ Heating oil is highly toxic in the short term, but it evaporates quickly, reducing the long-term damage.
▪ Read in studio A man who's accused of dumping highly toxic waste into a river has been remanded on bail.
▪ Police are warning that the chemicals are highly toxic and anyone who comes into contact with them should seek urgent medical attention.
▪ The drugs used are highly toxic and those in charge have to learn the dangers both to themselves and to patients.
▪ Among that sludge were quantities of the heavy metal Cadmium, known to be highly toxic.
▪ But it appears to be highly toxic, especially when vaporised.
▪ High level waste remains active for 250,000 years and is highly toxic to most life forms.
unlikely
▪ A return to formalism is highly unlikely given popular expectations of individualized justice.
▪ Anglers say it is highly unlikely as they are cold-blooded creatures.
▪ A couple of other points that make the purchase of Gazza highly unlikely. 1.
▪ It is, therefore, highly unlikely that imitation of adult models can explain their occurrence.
▪ Personally I thought this highly unlikely.
▪ In a climate of radical spending cuts, the latter seems highly unlikely.
▪ Scores of anecdotes in this book make these figures look highly unlikely.
▪ It may be a hybrid - if so, it is highly unlikely that it will produce young.
unusual
▪ The local committees varied greatly in their composition and operating procedures, some of which were highly unusual.
▪ It was a highly unusual presentation.
▪ You can also enjoy a highly unusual view of the area through the cameraobscura at Foredown Tower and Countryside Centre.
▪ Receiving such intensive medical therapy is highly unusual, allergists said.
▪ This was highly unusual, since most golfers prefer their caddies to be well out of the way for such crucial short putts.
▪ They were the ultimate female role models: highly unusual, gifted, respected women.
▪ Even so, the discovery of an unknown mass grave is highly unusual.
▪ This was highly unusual at that time.
variable
▪ The rather specific environmental requirements of salt weathering mean that its action is spatially highly variable.
▪ The period-to-period growth in offshore deposits at times has been highly variable relative to the growth in domestic deposits.
▪ The attitude of employers to domestic responsibilities is of considerable importance and highly variable.
▪ These fish are highly variable in color and pattern.
▪ Communication Colour is more important to fish than to mammals and birds, and in fish it is often highly variable.
▪ Although it was policy for all children to be welcome in council provision, in reality this was highly variable.
▪ Staining times in particular are highly variable, and those given herein should only be used as a starting point.
▪ The amount of delegation that occurs is thus highly variable and seldom entirely predictable.
visible
▪ It is highly visible, but there is an enormous mass of activity underneath.
▪ Those highly visible operations, which featured heavily armed government forces using aggressive pressure tactics, ended in deadly violence.
▪ Unemployment in the 1920s and 1930s, partly through the types of demonstrations outlined above, was highly visible.
▪ It is characteristic of most research writing that topic areas are set off, underlined or otherwise made highly visible.
▪ The operation would be highly visible.
▪ The results were highly visible and, in short order, Tom was promoted.
▪ Mrs Thatcher was still highly visible at international summits, but often now as an obstructive, quarrelsome figure.
▪ Cultural intolerance, even in this highly visible, assimilated school, is everywhere.
volatile
▪ Thus the L curve can be highly volatile.
▪ High-tech stocks have always been highly volatile, partly because of their past booms and busts.
▪ This is partly because changes in institutional stockholding can make markets highly volatile and therefore risky for smaller investors.
▪ Weekly unemployment claims are a highly volatile indicator and prove little by themselves.
▪ Long-term trends suggest that economic optimism was highly volatile.
▪ It is highly volatile, and through its impact on productivity affects both supply and demand sides of the economy.
▪ As a consequence, fertility has been highly volatile.
■ VERB
become
▪ The damage that goats can inflict on each other with their sharp horns is so great that aggression has become highly ritualised.
▪ All these would now become highly relevant issues.
▪ Salt, therefore, became highly prized.
▪ Because most of the data in this world is inexact, this characteristic becomes highly significant.
▪ The House of Windsor has become highly adept at the business of its own survival.
▪ I was becoming highly agitated, and a little claustrophobic.
▪ Among the maharajas tiger shooting became highly competitive.
▪ Over time, this supermarket company had become highly diversified.
charge
▪ Surman's highly charged lyricism adds a vital extra dimension.
▪ Cecilia viuda is highly charged emotionally and tears flow freely.
▪ In a highly charged meeting the council backed him by 459 votes to 403.
▪ His literary style is representative of this highly charged emotional tone.
▪ In this Lange creates a highly charged emotional text dependent upon her use of children and the mother.
▪ The highly charged atmosphere of the House panel contrasted sharply with a similar investigation being conducted in the Senate, where Sen.
▪ Even in this highly charged emotional moment she knew she must not forget the milkman.
▪ In fact it is a highly charged political question.
develop
▪ For smaller companies, where financial controls are not highly developed, factoring may prove the answer.
▪ But perhaps the most vivid and compelling evidence of this highly developed colour sensibility is the artefacts themselves.
▪ Her strengths are impressive: her competence in the world, her highly developed social skills, her humor, her warmth.
▪ This leaves him with a personality that is highly developed in one direction at the expense of the rest.
▪ Ida Rebecca had small book learning but highly developed sensitivity, particularly when it came to judging outsiders.
▪ Waste incineration is one of the most technically highly developed waste management options at this time.
▪ General managers and top executives must have highly developed personal skills.
educate
▪ The highly educated women who have started working apace are hardly competing with unskilled men.
▪ San Diegans also are highly educated, have current passports and subscribe to cable in large numbers.
▪ Nurses were more highly educated and accountable for their actions as professionals than they used to be.
▪ Franklin Roosevelt obviously benefited from his elite, highly educated upbringing.
▪ She was highly educated and was good at crossword puzzles and so unlikely to make such an elementary error.
▪ Some of them are very highly educated.
▪ In practice, spoken language interpreters are highly educated and highly trained.
▪ The arts tourist is more highly educated, more affluent, and stays longer than the average tourist.
motivate
▪ They are highly motivated and rarely compromise.
▪ A highly intelligent, highly motivated, and extremely personable young woman, Crystal has had numerous supports along the way.
▪ It is essential therefore that the managers are highly motivated.
▪ Highly motivated and highly skilled individuals will prosper in this environment.
▪ Students are highly motivated, participate actively in the learning process and receive feedback as to the progress made.
▪ Like most epileptics who are surgical candidates, Neil is highly motivated.
▪ It was a motley but highly motivated crew, and in a poll with just 32 % turnout that did the trick.
▪ Immigrants tend to be a highly motivated, self-selected group with a strong will to succeed.
organize
▪ North Shields had highly organized workers in the yards and on the railways.
▪ Political resources: Substantial financial power, strong interest, a few highly organized producers, professional lobbyists. 5.
▪ They are the result of investment in highly organized scientific and engineering knowledge and skills.
▪ Richard and his two companions settle into a utopian but highly organized existence.
▪ But the trade is highly organized.
pay
▪ The highly paid, like the corporations that employ them, are mobile, and can play one state off against another.
▪ Montana is one of a number of once highly paid athletes who have filed workers' compensation claims in California.
▪ However, I criticise the trend towards not having highly paid and experienced staff.
▪ And you need not have been a highly paid executive to be in that position.
▪ This demonstrates how difficult it has become to determine the real incomes of such highly paid directors.
place
▪ The Gingrich investigation is hardly the first time Cole has taken on highly placed public figures.
▪ Now and then, as a favor to highly placed people, Papa performed operations.
praise
▪ Francis Beckett's highly praised biography is now available in paperback for the first time.
▪ She also realizes the attorney, whom she highly praised, worked for relatively low rates.
▪ Jonathon Miller directed performances of Eugene Onegin and Rigoletto which were highly praised by critics and public.
▪ The painting of St Basil's Cathedral was highly praised.
▪ Sweetmeats, cakes or puddings follow ... the variety has been highly praised by our guests over the last five years.
prize
▪ The affluent viewers who watch financial news are highly prized by advertisers.
▪ It was something else to tell that to a highly prized research scientist, engineer, or computer programmer.
▪ Fasting produced intense dreams and the capacity to dream was highly prized.
▪ The AK47 was a highly prized souvenir and frequently traded by frontline troops to those in the rear for choice booty.
▪ Its fish are highly prized, and the fish soup from Szeged has until now been a national delicacy.
▪ Swallows' nests were highly prized delicacies.
▪ Academic freedom in higher education is something we prize highly.
▪ And nothing is more highly prized than fiscal responsibility.
publicize
▪ Tijuana's reputation for drug-related homicides was reinforced last year by several highly publicized cases.
▪ The highly publicized abortion debate overshadowed the rest of the platform that calls for a smorgasbord of constitutional amendments.
▪ That question appears to lie at the heart of the highly publicized battle raging between Hasbro Inc. and Mattel Inc.
▪ Two recent, highly publicized events have helped to bring the literacy crisis to the national attention.
▪ They changed the subject by noting their prosecution of some highly publicized cases against the Klan and other white supremacist organizations.
▪ The new regime immediately began to review Davis's many highly publicized deals and were not pleased With the Stax agreement.
▪ Their highly publicized forays energized and emboldened the Catholic Right.
qualify
▪ He either carefully studied these himself or arranged for research to be done on them by the most highly qualified specialists.
▪ However, the number of openings is relatively small; only the most highly qualified are selected.
▪ This provided them with a highly qualified list of potential customers matching their target demographic groups.
▪ The preliminary investigation showed that Jeremy was more highly qualified and that management had made a sound decision.
▪ Staff are highly qualified and specialists in their subjects.
▪ After several interviews, he selected a much younger, but highly qualified candidate.
▪ Their instructors must be highly qualified and experienced, and the simulators used in training should embrace all types of accident.
▪ In one case, a highly qualified chemist was actually requested by the University Council and began to teach early in October.
rate
▪ Questions on health, self-care and education were all highly rated by over 70 percent of respondents.
▪ Of the 11 most highly rated wines, six were from California.
▪ He impressed last year on his rare appearances in the first team and is highly rated.
▪ Independence does not rate highly with them, whereas their health does.
▪ Commercialism was not a quality she rated highly, but protection of one's children from outsiders was.
▪ And all four burners are highly rated.
▪ Only words rated highly or this latter dimension were included in our lists.
recommend
▪ The holiday was one I have always dreamed about and I would highly recommend the centre to any outdoor enthusiast.
▪ Many of these products are as close to the natural diet as one can get and are highly recommended.
▪ She had come highly recommended, her latest play having run for six months in London.
▪ A kitchen fan or open windows are highly recommended.
▪ The hotel grows its own produce and its wines are highly recommended.
▪ All ages are welcome, and warm clothes are highly recommended, along with a flashlight, binoculars and a blanket.
▪ Their booklets are written by specialists in the field, and are highly recommended.
▪ A dunk into that aforementioned garlic butter sauce is highly recommended.
regard
▪ The artist is highly regarded internationally and has exhibited in many countries.
▪ He has appointed a highly regarded three-star Marine general, James L.. Jones, to be his military assistant.
▪ Darjeeling Known as the champagne tea and highly regarded for afternoon drinking.
▪ This is highly regarded and influential in police circles and the social worker would do well to be aware of its thinking.
▪ Treasury Secretary John B.. Connally was backing his appointment as a highly regarded tax professional.
▪ Two incidents marked his highly regarded but controversial career in Chicago.
▪ The most highly regarded also had an articulate vision, going beyond vapid cliches of what the nation should become.
remain
▪ I therefore included it as a separate mode although my analysis remained highly tentative.
▪ The technology of high-speed Internet access on cable systems remains highly promising too.
▪ Nevertheless he remained highly sceptical of quantum theory.
▪ It is enough to point out that they remain highly disputed topics of debate in the philosophy of science.
▪ Exercising that collective responsibility remains highly problematic.
▪ It remains highly amusing to us.
▪ Nevertheless, national security issues and the incidence of military conflict remain highly significant.
▪ The ie has ceased to exist as a legal entity, but the family unit has remained highly influential.
respect
▪ He is highly respected and is Anthony Herbert's assistant judge in the players' court.
▪ He is generous and highly respected in the district.
▪ Ambitious, focused, and in command, Plum was highly respected by his staff end patients.
▪ Teachers are often highly respected and children will confide in them.
▪ His playing carried the Dixieland flavor, but he was a highly respected musician who added bluesy vocals to his work.
▪ Alexander served two exemplary terms as Tennessee governor; the highly respected Senator Lugar is a leading expert on foreign policy.
▪ Avro Avians were highly respected both for dependability and performance.
seem
▪ There is no record of Osbald's parentage but a Bernician extraction seems highly probable.
▪ On the other hand, the Jackson amendment seemed highly unlikely to pass Congress, and the attempt could be costly politically.
▪ However, such an outcome seems highly unlikely in the present political climate.
▪ Their own students were defiant and seemed highly unappreciative.
▪ It seems highly likely that this contributes to their increased risk of infection.
▪ In general, practical support between relatives seems highly gendered, with women much more involved than men.
▪ What is much more important is deliberately to look for alternatives even when the present answer or proposal seems highly satisfactory.
▪ He seems highly sensitive to criticism in the press.
speak
▪ But her colleagues and superiors could not fault her dedication to the job, speaking highly of her nursing ability.
▪ A middle-aged man spoke highly of the efforts to place the exhibition in its historical context.
▪ That has to speak highly for the way in which the software does its internal calculations and comes up with the answers.
▪ The few contemporary references to Traherne which survive all speak highly both of his learning and of his character.
▪ Fred always spoke highly of Lord Lurgan's golf.
▪ I recall you speaking highly of Tullio Serafin?
▪ Despite initial fears, agencies now speak highly of the effectiveness of the Support Force had in pushing forward the reforms.
▪ They spoke highly of his friendliness and good manners and, as an afterthought, his professional skills.
specialize
▪ Essentially, each code word is a separate, highly specialized entity.
▪ In large organizations, their duties may be highly specialized.
▪ Jochen Schleese might be described as a highly specialized custom tailor.
string
▪ Breeds differ in how highly strung they are, how much they snap at children and in their fondness for barking.
structure
▪ They are not restricted, as formal databases are, to record material that is highly structured.
▪ It may be particularly difficult for small firms to provide highly structured and intensive work-based learning experiences.
▪ The first applications therefore were with archive material, which was itself highly structured and which was available in quantity.
▪ At first, interviews were highly structured.
▪ It is highly structured with strict procedures and rules for every task.
▪ We know from the start that it is highly structured.
▪ The drawing system, if it is any good, is highly structured.
▪ Unlike Cage and his followers, Glass leaves no room for the intrusion of the random, his music being highly structured.
train
▪ In practice, spoken language interpreters are highly educated and highly trained.
▪ Highly trained and experienced financial managers head each financial department.
▪ Today it is identically equipped to the Regular Army and is highly trained in at least one speciality.
▪ They were tough, highly trained volunteers in the Airborne, but some looked very young to me.
▪ Swordsmen are amongst the most highly trained and proficient of the provincial regiments.
▪ It was, by and large, the domain of highly trained white men.
▪ The Reiksguard forms an elite core of highly trained, expensively-equipped troops who are loyal to the Emperor in person.
▪ With the touch of a button, these highly trained technicians can change the picture being transmitted.
value
▪ The soul of a true Hero always finds a better rate of exchange, and is valued highly by the gods.
▪ Like the photogram they were highly valued because of the absolute impersonality achieved in the tonal rendering through some mechanistic agency.
▪ One reason for the Surrealists' relatively slow climb since 1975 is that they were highly valued then.
▪ Individual contributions are highly valued, within a focus on collaboration and integration.
▪ Such contributions were highly valued because the members felt that they were learning much about their own school.
▪ Although this community imposed its own brand of conformity in many ways, individual expression was valued highly.
▪ Physical education is highly valued and forms part of a fully integrated educational programme based on a unitary conception of man.
▪ Verbal systems are highly valued as children learn to talk, read, and write.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
brightly/highly/richly etc coloured
finely/highly tuned
▪ And it is our experience that successful entrepreneurs quickly develop a finely tuned instinct for investing their time in high-profit opportunities.
▪ Dana had been too determined to avoid her, and Claudia's finely tuned senses told her Dana was uneasy.
▪ He was a highly tuned machine for using people.
▪ He was a highly sensitized instrument, a finely tuned social and academic barometer.
▪ It is a finely tuned art that depends on the perceptive skills and sound judgment of the consultant.
▪ Or had it been between them, or only in her own highly tuned emotions?
▪ Secondly, in some species the choice is remarkably finely tuned so that under certain circumstances familiarity may be preferred over novelty.
▪ True each of them has been finely tuned.
think highly of sb/sth
▪ Most of the women were college graduates, thought highly of Smith, and were pleased that this stranger was so smart.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a highly flammable liquid
▪ Danger: highly flammable materials!
▪ He's a highly gifted young singer.
▪ I think it's highly unlikely that Bob had anything to do with the theft.
▪ Our engineers are highly skilled and very difficult to replace when they leave.
▪ She arrived in Australia as a refugee, but went on to become a highly successful lawyer.
▪ The demand for highly educated workers is still increasing.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ An entrance exam guides students into one of four academic tracks, ranging from highly gifted to remedial.
▪ As little as 55 pounds of highly enriched uranium or 18 pounds of plutonium could be used to build a nuclear device.
▪ At the same time, shoppers are becoming highly receptive to new technology.
▪ Branding the Black Chamber highly illegal, he at once directed that all its State Department funds be cut off.
▪ However, such an outcome seems highly unlikely in the present political climate.
▪ In others, we see evidence of females highly honored and males almost disregarded.
▪ This last is not so easy as it may seem, but can be highly illuminating.
WordNet

highly

  1. adv. to a high degree or extent; favorably or with much respect; "highly successful"; "He spoke highly of her"; "does not think highly of his writing"; "extremely interesting" [syn: extremely]

  2. at a high rate or wage; "highly paid workers"

  3. in a high position or level or rank; "details known by only a few highly placed persons"

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

highly

Old English healice "nobly, gloriously, honorably;" see high (adj.) + -ly (1). Meaning "very, very much, fully" is mid-14c.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Highly

Highly \High"ly\, adv. In a high manner, or to a high degree; very much; as, highly esteemed.

Wiktionary

highly

adv. 1 In a high or esteemed manner. 2 extremely; greatly; very much.

Wikipedia

Usage examples of "highly".

But it is striking in how high degree the authors have created their own universes, with highly specific natural laws, and how this has been done as a sort of intellectual game: creating worlds as frameworks to the narrative and molding them into shape with complete disregard for commonly accepted logic, much in the same way as the absurdists, Ionesco and Alfred Jarry and others, later did.

But for a rival house to know that Mara had chosen to go personally to the slave market bespoke the presence of an informant very highly placed in Acoma ranks.

One highly impressive exhibit of early state legislative power is afforded by the ferocious catalogue of legislation directed against the Tories, embracing acts of confiscation, bills of pains and penalties, even acts of attainder.

But Adams thought highly of Dana, the boy excelled at French, and the experience, Adams felt, would stand him well for the future.

He was also a highly considered journalist and the deputy editor of the Golden City Mail, a large-circulation English-language newspaper which was stubbornly and outspokenly opposed to the Nationalist Afrikaner government of John Vorster and its policy of apartheid.

Trend that Ardath and certain others highly disapproved of Algol, that would rob him at least of his better-funded prey.

A little reluctantly, he stripped all the way down to his briefs, conscious that his body had already reacted to her presence, and that his reaction was highly visible.

The realm of the panpan was highly Americanized, whereas the black market, even when GIs roamed through it, was first and last for the Japanese.

Who was this americano who could manipulate his highly trained body as if he were a puppet?

Clearly, the invaders had amplification devices strong enough to overcome an array of big amps, but it was highly dubious that they could overcome all twenty-eight Kagans working together through the network.

Some physiological observers have remarked that among the more highly organized species of animals the creature struggles against the ligatures previous to a second operation more than it did at its first experience.

That, as far as we can judge, it is highly improbable that, without experiments made upon animals, mankind would by now have been in possession of such knowledge.

That, as far as we can judge, it is highly improbable that without experiments made upon animals, mankind would, at the present time, have been in possession of such knowledge.

Aldovrandi at Bologna, as Condivi tells us, Michael Angelo, for the sum of thirty ducats, completed the drapery of a San Petronio, begun by Nicolo di Bari on the arca or shrine of San Domenico, and carved the very beautiful and highly finished statuette of an angel holding a candlestick, still to be seen there.

Tony May is analyzing the genomes of archaebacterial species that inhabit the hot, anaerobic waters of hydrothermal vents and deep rocks, looking for highly conserved genes that may have belonged to the universal ancestor of all life on Earth.