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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

hatred

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
excite hatred/hostility
▪ He accused sections of the media of trying to excite racial hatred.
pure hatred
▪ She remembered the look of pure hatred in his eyes.
racial hatred (=hatred of people based on their race)
▪ He was prosecuted for inciting racial hatred.
sb’s eyes are full of hatred/fear etc
▪ The prisoners stared at him, their eyes full of hatred.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
pure
▪ As the porters wheeled the trolley away, the girl opened her eyes and stared at Juliet with pure hatred.
▪ I turned and looked her in the eyes and between us passed pure hatred.
▪ Janir glared at me, a look of pure hatred.
▪ All he could do was beam a ray of pure hatred at Sherman.
racial
▪ The time and place are also factors that might have some bearing on whether or not racial hatred was likely.
▪ If their tendency is that they are likely or intended to stir up racial hatred, that is sufficient. 4.
▪ To date, there have been no prosecutions for this version of the offence of inciting to racial hatred.
▪ This contrasts with the racial hatred offence, where the distribution must be to the public or a section of the public.
▪ Mihailovic is said to be under police investigation on charges of incitement to racial hatred.
▪ Judge McKinnon had been widely criticized for comments made during his hearing of a case of inciting racial hatred.
▪ Now the same ugly forces of racial hatred are beginning to rear their heads again.
■ VERB
feel
▪ It was terrifying to think that some one could feel such hatred towards you that they could do something like this.
▪ I felt a stab of hatred for his captors.
▪ I felt no hatred for him.
▪ Dalgliesh's private verdict was that it was technically brilliant, but overwrought and painted, he felt, in hatred.
▪ It was possible to feel the antagonism and hatred of the two sets of guards facing each other across the frontier.
▪ Where once I felt hatred, now I only feel compassion.
▪ Whatever she had felt at nineteen, hatred was all that was left now, and hatred ought to impart strength.
▪ Killion felt hatred flare inside his whisky-bound guts.
incite
▪ It introduced a code of conduct for political parties, banning the use of language likely to incite violence or hatred.
▪ Religious fanatics cooled down temporarily, the better to incite hatred another day.
▪ To date, there have been no prosecutions for this version of the offence of inciting to racial hatred.
▪ Judge McKinnon had been widely criticized for comments made during his hearing of a case of inciting racial hatred.
▪ Quite rightly there is legislation to stop material that incites race hatred.
stir
▪ If their tendency is that they are likely or intended to stir up racial hatred, that is sufficient. 4.
▪ This has caused humanitarian problems that have helped to stir up racism and hatred.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
inveterate fondness/distrust/hatred etc
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I could see the jealousy and hatred in Jeff's eyes.
▪ In her autobiography, she describes her hatred for her stepfather.
▪ The experience left him with a deep hatred of politicians.
▪ The long cold winter had only increased his hatred of the place.
▪ Tom had a hatred of any kind of authority.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Christina backed away from Michael, whose handsome face was twisted and distorted by hatred.
▪ He grabbed the putter from me and funneled all his temporary hatred for the game into effort and sank that twenty-footer.
▪ On thing is clear: the level of mutual hatred.
▪ Pure, liquid hatred bubbled behind my eyes.
▪ Stephen, lying in a shellhole with Byrne, felt his body tense with hatred at the sound of them.
▪ Their enemies may well then start to temper their hatred with a little respect.
Wikipedia

Hatred (film)

Hatred (, translit. Nenavist) is a 1975 Soviet film directed by Samvel Gasparov.

Hatred

Hatred (or hate) is a deep and emotional extreme dislike. It can be directed against individuals, groups, entities, objects, behaviors, or ideas. Hatred is often associated with feelings of anger, disgust and a disposition towards hostility.

Hatred (2012 film)

Hatred (in Persian: بغض; transliterated: boqz) is a 2012 Iranian drama film directed by Reza Dormishian. It is set in Istanbul, Turkey and deals with Iranian youth immigration.

Hatred (video game)

Hatred is an isometric shoot 'em up video game developed and published by Destructive Creations and was released on June 1, 2015 on Microsoft Windows. The player-character is a misanthropic mass-killing sociopath who begins a "genocide crusade" to kill as many human beings as possible. The developer described Hatred as a reaction to video game aesthetic trends such as political correctness, politeness, vivid color, and games as art. Its October 2014 announcement trailer was characterized as "controversial" by multiple video game journalists. The game was shortly removed by Valve Corporation from their Steam Greenlight service due to its extremely violent content but was later brought back with a personal apology from Gabe Newell. It was then successfully greenlit on December 29, 2014 and fully released on June 1, 2015.

Hatred received negative critic reviews, with some panning the game for its lack of variation, and one critic drawing comparisons between Hatred and the 1997 video game Postal.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Hatred

Hatred \Ha"tred\ (h[=a]"tr[e^]d), n. [OE. hatred, hatreden. See Hate, and cf. Kindred.] Strong aversion; intense dislike; hate; an affection of the mind awakened by something regarded as evil.

Syn: Odium; ill will; enmity; hate; animosity; malevolence; rancor; malignity; detestation; loathing; abhorrence; repugnance; antipathy. See Odium.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

hatred

early 13c., from hate + rare suffix -red, from Old English ræden "state, condition," related to verb rædan "to advise, discuss, rule, read, guess." See read (v.) and see second element of kindred and proper names Æþelræd and Alfred.

Wiktionary

hatred

n. Strong aversion; intense dislike; hateful regard; an affection of the mind awakened by something regarded as unpleasant, harmful or evil.

WordNet

hatred

n. the emotion of hate; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action [syn: hate] [ant: love]

Usage examples of "hatred".

Now the brothers would tear Achar apart in their hatred for each other, tear it apart until finally they stood sword to sword in the Chamber of the Moons.

Revenge and the hatred for the monsters that tore my body apart, were my major incentives to keep the search for Adeem alive.

It is the same with all other sins, with adultery and whoredom, revenge and hatred, blasphemy and lying.

Thus if one acknowledges that revenge and hatred, adultery and fornication, fraud and deceit, blasphemy and lying are sins against God and yet commits them, he is therefore in the more grievous of this kind of profanation.

Hatred does, and revenge, theft and fraud, adultery and whoredom, pride and presumption, and the rest.

It was the difference between the manners of Tewksbury and Tuscumbia, between being brought up amid the cruelties of the almshouse and the affectionate warmth of an upper-middle-class Southern home, between an Irish cultural heritage of black pessimism and hot hatred of patronizing rulers and the genial, self-confident outlook of a class that despite the Civil War was still master.

She is calling racism, sexism, class ism ageism, homophobia, and colonialism by the name of body hatred, and She is linking the politics of control back to the abuse of Flerself.

The apprehension of a revolt had inspired the most rigorous precautions: oppression had been aggravated by insult, and the consciousness of the public hatred had been productive of every measure that could render it still more implacable.

Danlo had learned to restrain the worst of his hatred, and he began to understand the terrible patience and strength that ahimsa required of a man.

Poor old soul - to what pitiful depths of hallucination had his liquor, plus his hatred of the decay, alienage, and disease around him, brought that fertile, imaginative brain?

Poor old soul--to what pitiful depths of hallucination had his liquor, plus his hatred of the decay, alienage, and disease around him, brought that fertile, imaginative brain?

But the apocryphal fable is nonetheless eloquent testimony to the gathering suspicion and hatred directed at the court, which, along with officials in Paris, was held responsible for the plight of the common people.

His hatred, like a powerless though furious wave, was broken against the strong ascendancy which Mercedes exercised over him.

Just then Atene looked round and saw him and an expression of hatred and contempt gathered on her beautiful face.

In a nation so averse to the English government and religion, these very virtues were sufficient to draw on him the public hatred.