Find the word definition

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

hat

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
bobble hat
coat stand/hat stand (=for hanging coats or hats on)
cocked hat
▪ My mother is such a good cook she knocks everybody else into a cocked hat.
cowboy hat
hard hat
hat box
hat stand
hat trick
▪ Saunders scored a hat trick in the final game of the series.
old hat
▪ Most of this is probably old hat to you, isn’t it?
panama hat
scored a hat trick
▪ Saunders scored a hat trick in the final game of the series.
sun hat
ten-gallon hat
top hat
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ He was in yellow trousers and big hat.
▪ More options include a white patent-leather tote bag and a big straw hat or scarf tied a la Audrey Hepburn.
▪ It was black and he had a big shiny hat.
▪ The benign old woman wore a big flowered garden hat and tended a magical flower garden.
▪ One of his eyes was half closed, and he wore a big hat which covered most of his head.
▪ Many wore big hats out the door, especially Cat-in-the-Hat-style stovepipes.
▪ No one could see a thing round her big spotted hat.
▪ I walk like I seen them soldiers do - the ones with the red suits and big hats I seen.
black
▪ Zaborski touched the corner of his black felt hat in automatic acknowledgment of the salute although his thoughts were elsewhere.
▪ She wore a black coat and had a Soviet Railway badge pinned to her black hat.
▪ As the clock struck twelve, the Judge placed the black hat on his head.
▪ Betty was the Blue Girl, with a hawk-wing swoop of black hat, forbidding gaze, hands grasping the white chair.
▪ She was there every single night, a formidable figure in her long, black skirt, cardigan and black straw hat.
▪ Then Kathleen, in a purple silk dress with black stripes, a black hat, and black shoes.
▪ She was wearing black with a black straw hat with a deep brim like a laurel wreath.
▪ Behind the big drum came the band of four musicians dressed in loose black tunics and black pillbox hats.
hard
▪ If hydrogen sulfide or some other poisonous gas is detected, Donahue dons an airtight breathing device and a hard hat.
▪ You haven't got hard hats on.
▪ When no vapors are present, he simply wears the hard hat.
▪ However, cyclists make a good example because they too are starting to wear hard hats.
▪ When no vapors are present, he simply wears the hard hat. Hard hats, of course, are not air-tight.
▪ All men on site will be required to wear hard hats and safety boots at all times within the designated areas.
▪ Radio across town were handing out hard hats for a press tour of their nearly completed Beverly Hills facility.
large
▪ Lily was wearing a peach coat and dress with a large picture hat and gloves to match.
▪ This was shown with a large round lace hat brim, on a cream satin band.
▪ She wore a large white straw hat and looked as if she'd just been to church.
▪ And she favoured large hats, like the one she had on now, with wax flowers decorating it.
▪ He was carefully dressed in a dandified fashion in white flannels and a large panama hat protected his head.
▪ Bright little bunches of cherries or grapes splashed their large hats with colour.
▪ Well-dressed ladies in large hats came along to hear the judgement, and the room was bright with colour.
little
▪ My favourites are these ones with black heads and a little red hat.
▪ In the end, she and Bessie man-aged to make three of them into a muff and a little hat.
▪ I watch this man with a red face and a little black hat sweeping all the rubbish up.
▪ Like the bandsmen I also wore a little black pillbox hat.
▪ Madeleine was so wide-eyed and chic in her full-skirted coat and little hat.
▪ I remember thinking how funny he looked because he wore a sort of little beanie hat.
▪ The women wore little hats which look like smoking caps.
old
▪ It was old hat, anyway.
▪ Many of us have been using answering machines for so long, it feels like old hat.
▪ The propaganda of Josef Goebbels is old hat.
▪ Good news for mutual funds is starting to seem old hat.
▪ It is as old as a hat pasted on a young man's head in a mid-Victorian family album.
▪ This is a concept new to the auto industry but old hat to purveyors of soap, suds and soup.
▪ He leaned over her, removed her cheap hatpin and her old straw hat.
red
▪ My favourites are these ones with black heads and a little red hat.
▪ The woman was wearing a red hat which Katharine impertinently asked to try on.
▪ Gingham dungarees, £33.99, Benetton 012. Red gingham hat £20 approx, Chipie.
▪ His little red hat and shoes still fitted him.
▪ She wore a red woolly hat and scarf and gloves, which Emma had bought her, and a dark belted mac.
▪ She was wearing her best coat, dark red, and a dark red hat to match.
straw
▪ She looked at us again, then removed her cone-shaped straw hat and covered parts of him with it.
▪ Inside the car were three dark men and a tall man in a white suit and straw hat.
▪ He wears a suit and a dress shirt without a tie, along with a straw hat that is out of style.
▪ More options include a white patent-leather tote bag and a big straw hat or scarf tied a la Audrey Hepburn.
▪ It created an odd effect, because, as he shook his head, he still fanned himself with his straw hat.
▪ Miss Sadie in a pink straw hat.
tall
▪ He's got his big winter coat on with silver buttons and his tall hat.
▪ Governor King was standing there, holding his tall hat in his hand.
▪ They had removed their tall hats and placed them on their knees.
▪ A buxom woman wears a tall hat.
▪ A typical Victorian martinet, he wore a tall hat all his life.
▪ Father Poole placed his tall silk hat on his head and picked up his stick.
▪ Agnes thought that a dumpy girl should not wear a tall hat, especially with black.
▪ First three nurses, wearing their strange tall hats.
top
▪ He paused inside, adjusted his top hat.
▪ Janet Flanner, cross-legged on the floor, top hat decorated with one black, one white mask.
▪ Gentlemen will wear morning dress with top hat, or service dress.
▪ He, too, wore a black top hat, a black frock coat and black trousers.
▪ At most weddings the bride wears a veil but at this wedding the bride was wearing a beautiful top hat.
▪ A reinforced riding top hat from Christie's costs £120 and the veil an extra £2.95.
▪ They were the people in top hats that the rest of us used to throw snowballs at.
▪ The tall lantern jawed villain in top hat and tails plays an organ.
white
▪ She was dressed in a white frock and a round white straw hat.
▪ He picked up my white cloth hat and fastened it to my hair with a hatpin.
▪ By Monday the roofs of the town were wearing thick white hats and the traffic was having difficulties.
▪ He thought we saw him as kind of a guy in a white hat.
▪ Only the white hat didn't have a chance to pull his six-shooter.
▪ He wore a white ten-gallon hat and black cowboy boots decorated with swastikas and stars.
▪ She wore a large white straw hat and looked as if she'd just been to church.
▪ Students wore red-and-#white hats instead of uniforms.
woollen
▪ Just a wet walker in a woollen hat, eating a cheese sandwich in the rain.
▪ Claris looks out from under her limp-brimmed woollen hat and asks me for an orange with a charming broken-toothed smile.
▪ She ought to have recognized Harry, that woollen hat, the jacket.
▪ And on his head a woollen ski hat with a bobble on top.
▪ I pulled off my woollen hat and shook out my hair and at once recognition dawned in her face.
▪ I pulled on my woollen hat.
▪ A man in overalls and a woollen hat with a bobble on top appeared.
▪ I was wearing a blue woollen sailor's hat as disguise.
woolly
▪ A choir of families, wrapped in woolly hats, overcoats and scarves, were singing carols by a crib.
▪ Reduce global warming by wearing a woolly hat.
▪ Leonard Nimoy always wears his lucky woolly hat on set. 20.
▪ It's a woman I think - a young black woman with a woolly hat on.
▪ I wish I had my woolly hat on, not my straw one.
▪ He doesn't quite go around in wellies and a woolly hat.
▪ I take off my woolly hat and try it on.
▪ If you can imagine a benevolent and myopic stork in goggles and woolly hat, then you've just about got the picture.
■ NOUN
bobble
▪ She's got this cute little duffle coat on and a bobble hat with her hair sticking out the bottom.
▪ You know the Dougie Rae thing, it's still bothering me, how exactly did he get the bobble hat concession?
▪ She sold one or two bobble hats, then moved one hundred and fifty miles away.
▪ And no one, but no one is wearing a bobble hat.
▪ You can't pull the bobble hat over my eyes.
▪ Yes, Henry thought sourly, pushing a torch into his anorak pocket and looking round for his bobble hat.
▪ They put a temporary dressing on his cut nose and his wife puts a bobble hat on his head.
bowler
▪ I like classic hats - this baseball cap, for instance, or a bowler hat.
▪ He wore a trim bowler hat and an overcoat.
▪ There were men in frock coats and bowler hats.
▪ He found Woodruffe with a tall, one-armed man in a raincoat and a bowler hat.
▪ His bowler hat is pushed way back on his head; his hands are thrust into his jacket.
▪ It sailed out of the horizontally opening window and fell on the bowler hat of a ratepayer on the street underneath.
▪ I must confess that I would prefer to see a pigtail with an earring rather than the traditional civil service bowler hat.
cowboy
▪ He was dressed in checked golfing trousers, cowboy boots and a cowboy hat.
▪ The contractor was a tall man with a beer belly and a cowboy hat.
▪ Ranchers turned out in force to hear him; the crowd was a bobbing sea of black and white cowboy hats.
▪ A man whose weathered face is all but hidden beneath a wide-brimmed cowboy hat.
▪ The press photographs show the artist in cowboy hat with a shotgun, surrounded by skulls and horns.
▪ He wore a black cowboy hat, black shirt, fatigue pants, combat boots.
▪ At a cattle auction, the rough men under the cowboy hats shrug their shoulders.
▪ A pair of buffalo horns and a cowboy hat were set above backlit, multi-colored bottles on shelves.
felt
▪ Her head was shrunken under a tight-fitting felt hat.
▪ His face was round and turnip-like, a soft felt hat crammed on it, and his boots were brown and polished.
▪ Mrs Kulass put on a ratty fur coat, a shabby felt hat, and put her hands inside an old muff.
▪ There was one in a loden green suit with a felt hat - in May! - and terrible legs.
▪ I wore it on cold days with soft leather boots, a mouton coat, and a large brimmed black felt hat.
▪ She had been wrapped in a woollen blanket and the only clothes she wore were a felt hat and fur shoes.
fur
▪ He is an extreme nationalist, who threatens war and expansion at the drop of a fur hat.
▪ The driver, muffled in his fur hat, had not noticed a thing.
▪ A man in a fur hat, long black leather coat, white shirt and silver tie got into the carriage.
▪ She washed clothes and dealt in smuggled electronic goods, rabbit-#fur hats, sunflower seeds, pearl necklaces and noodles.
▪ But beneath the cascading ringlets and whacky fur hats, there was undiluted vintage Gaultier tailoring.
▪ At last, as if at a secret signal, people leave off their fur hats.
panama
▪ The panama hat, in the finest woven straw, is the most classic version and a worthwhile investment.
▪ He wore white shoes, a dark shirt and lariat tie, a nice-looking panama hat.
▪ Haverford fanned himself with his panama hat and wheezed like a rusty concertina.
▪ David Ferric walked in wearing an undersized panama hat and a turtleneck shirt with a drooping collar.
▪ A maroon jacket and a panama hat with a shiny black ribbon.
▪ Women with stiff-brimmed panama hats turned up at the side and pinned with giant rosettes.
▪ He had a white panama hat with the colours of the Southsea cricket club on the hat band.
▪ He was carefully dressed in a dandified fashion in white flannels and a large panama hat protected his head.
sun
▪ They're largely similar to the Christmas versions but minus the fruitcake and cards and plus beach bags and sun hats.
trick
▪ There was worse to come seconds before the whistle, when Irons hit his hat trick and Swindon for once were well beaten.
▪ Wynalda nearly could have had a hat trick late in the first half, but elected instead to spread the wealth around.
▪ Ted Gilmour was the star man for the B team, claiming a hat trick of victories.
▪ He scored a hat trick for Rotherham t' other day.
▪ Part of this record-breaking hat trick was pulled off by Johnny Boy Gomes.
▪ Darlington were down and out a minute later when Mark McGhee crossed from the right for Maskell to complete his hat trick.
▪ Team captain Peter Blyth will be going for a hat trick of wins as captain - all with different teams.
■ VERB
buy
▪ We saw you watching us buy hats in St Malo, little sly boots.
▪ He bought a hat that suited him well.
▪ Before all my friends rush out to buy hats, I should point out that it wasn't the Bloke speaking.
draw
▪ At a ballot at the beginning of each session, 20 names are drawn out of the hat by the Deputy Speaker.
▪ First name drawn from the hat of those ordering advance tickets for the show was.
▪ Winners will be the first entries drawn from the hat and notified by post.
▪ Entries must be in by January 14, when the first 24 cards drawn from the hat will be the winners.
eat
▪ I wrote back, Paz said, I told him, Dada dead as dodo eat your hat.
▪ And if Fen thought he'd done all the chasing there, she'd eat her hat.
hang
▪ Rugby hangs its hat on the international game but that's also where the funds come from for the grass-roots development.
hold
▪ She holds her hat on her head with one hand.
▪ He held on to the hat and hurried on.
▪ If his composure is not guarded, is it fair to him to hold him accountable for hat he said?
▪ He was holding Maidstone's hat in both hands, turning it, feeding the brim inch by inch through his fingers.
▪ The life-size painting is a traditional portrait that depicts Drinkwater in a three-piece suit holding his trademark cowboy hat.
▪ It is important to hold on to our hats and remember that it was quite well reviewed at the time.
▪ Governor King was standing there, holding his tall hat in his hand.
pass
▪ We're going to pass the hat round later, buy some beer and go back to their place.
▪ Perhaps she thought that if she passed the hat the crowd would be generous.
▪ Also Beuys, passing through, hat and horse, quite mad.
▪ Nothing, if the injury persisted, but whatever a man's mates might collect for him by passing round a hat.
▪ Airbus will anyway soon be passing the hat around again for an enormous 700-seat aeroplane, much bigger than the Boeing 747.
pick
▪ He then picked up the hat.
▪ Philadelphia and Baltimore were just cities picked out of a hat.
▪ Stopping to pick his hat off the road, he looked up at the retreating men.
▪ Gerard Baker picked up his ranger hat from the ground where he had set it and walked me to my car.
pull
▪ He pulled his hat over his eyes, over his nose, his whole face, and held it there.
▪ He looked down at Bone and pulled out the pirate hat.
▪ Hocus Pocus features a rabbit magician, as well as a rabbit you can pull out of a hat and other surprises.
▪ She pulled off her hat, she made herself at home.
▪ A rabbit has been pulled out of the political hat, and might be handed to Hong Kong.
▪ Coming at the end of that big brass lineage, H-4 is as surprising as a rabbit pulled out of a hat.
▪ I pulled off my woollen hat and shook out my hair and at once recognition dawned in her face.
▪ He pulls on his hat, wipes his brow, spits out some quid.
put
▪ They felt pleased when the judge put on his black hat.
▪ She put on each hat and strolled around the room so everybody could see it.
▪ Would you have put on your disapproving hat and talked about tangled webs and reaping what you sow?
▪ And, third, if you put your stockholder hat on, it makes good sense.
▪ Mr Bumble put down his hat, unbuttoned his coat, folded his arms, and sat back in his chair.
▪ Nat put on his hat and walked away.
▪ If your hands are cold, try putting a hat on!
▪ I put my sales hat on only when a rep was really in trouble.
raise
▪ He always raised his hat when he saw me.
▪ At Travis's signal, Blondin, teetering on the rope, raised his hat and Travis fired.
▪ A curate rode towards them on a bicycle and raised his flat hat as he passed the column of men.
▪ He raised his hat to us and was gone.
▪ He raised his hat formally, and walked on.
▪ And so Fleury raised his hat, shook hands, and hurried away.
▪ Karelius contented himself with raising his hat.
▪ At the end of his song the young man bowed and raised his hat to the audience.
remove
▪ They had removed their tall hats and placed them on their knees.
▪ She looked at us again, then removed her cone-shaped straw hat and covered parts of him with it.
▪ One man in the crowd removed his hat and stood to attention, head bowed in prayer.
▪ Denver removed her hat and put the quilt with two squares of color over her feet.
▪ When he rose, he discovered that the gentleman had removed his hat.
▪ While the students cheered, the former prime minister slowly removed his hat and-coat and placed them on the stand beside him.
▪ He removed his straw hat and placed it on the empty chair beside him.
score
▪ He scored a hat trick for Rotherham t' other day.
▪ Rocastle has got to do the business, score a hat trick or something.
take
▪ I take my hat off to them.
▪ Hanson said, and the light monitor did his best, made men on all sides take off their hats.
▪ Whatever it was though, I take my hat off to Babs.
▪ The husband will take off his hat and throw it on the chair.
▪ And how upset they were when he took off his hat and smiled.
▪ She had taken off her straw hat.
▪ Then, just before stepping up to sign the register, he took off his hat.
▪ People will come to comprehend the holiness of it and take their hats off as in church.
throw
▪ Back home 2,000 fans greeted the news of the victory by throwing their hats into the air.
▪ One Republican, Fred Ronstadt, has also thrown his hat into the ring in Ward 6.
▪ Anyone who throws a hat into a public arena must be prepared to have it mercilessly though not maliciously trampled upon.
▪ In some cities, I threw my hat on the sidewalk and juggled oranges for the passersby.
tip
▪ Thrifty, hardworking, unemotional, they tipped their hats to no one.
▪ Stephen slid him a coin, the doorman tipped his hat with a smile.
▪ The watchman came out from his hut, tipped his hat, and opened the gate.
▪ Johnnie Walker tips his hat, smirks and hurries westward off the shelf.
wear
▪ Honey wears Bernie's unsuitable hat.
▪ Sometimes when the movie slows to a crawl, they chain-smoke while wearing hats.
▪ Her daughter was standing just inside the door, wearing her coat, hat and walking shoes.
▪ Unlike the other mourners, they were wearing Earnhardt jackets and hats.
▪ One night, a works policeman was disturbed in his office by a tramp-like figure wearing a strange hat.
▪ He wore a white ten-gallon hat and black cowboy boots decorated with swastikas and stars.
▪ By Monday the roofs of the town were wearing thick white hats and the traffic was having difficulties.
▪ They wear square hats, when they should try sombreros.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
I'll eat my hat
▪ If the Democrats win, I'll eat my hat!
at the drop of a hat
▪ He's willing to organize anything guests want at the drop of a hat.
be talking through your hat
coat check/hat check
hang up your hat/football boots/briefcase etc
knock/beat sb/sth into a cocked hat
▪ Cavalli had no difficulty knocking the work of other composers into a cocked hat.
tip your hat/cap (to sb)
▪ And with that word of reassurance, Black tips his hat to Blue and continues on his way.
▪ Johnnie Walker tips his hat, smirks and hurries westward off the shelf.
▪ Stephen slid him a coin, the doorman tipped his hat with a smile.
▪ The watchman came out from his hut, tipped his hat, and opened the gate.
▪ Thrifty, hardworking, unemotional, they tipped their hats to no one.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a big straw hat
▪ a cowboy hat
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ In his Roos-Atkins collapsible hat and safari jacket, he might have stepped from the pages of Field and Stream.
▪ It created an odd effect, because, as he shook his head, he still fanned himself with his straw hat.
▪ Oliver swept off his battered top hat in ironic acknowledgement of her sally.
▪ Peasants in cowboy hats have replaced well-heeled tourists beside a pool now filled only with two inches of green scum.
▪ She wore a large white straw hat and looked as if she'd just been to church.
▪ Some females were able to switch to the plaiting of straw hats, bonnets and mats.
Wikipedia

Hat

A hat is a head covering which is worn for various reasons, including protection against the elements, ceremonial reasons, religious reasons, safety, or as a fashion accessory. In the past, hats were an indicator of social status. In the military, hats may denote nationality, branch of service, rank, and/or regiment. Police typically wear distinctive hats such as peaked caps or brimmed hats, such as those worn by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Some hats have a protective function. As examples, the hard hat protects construction workers' heads from injury by falling objects and a British police Custodian helmet protects the officer's head, a sun hat shades the face and shoulders from the sun, a cowboy hat protects against sun and rain and a Ushanka fur hat with fold-down earflaps keeps the head and ears warm. Some hats are worn for ceremonial purposes, such as the mortarboard, which is worn (or carried) during university graduation ceremonies. Some hats are worn by members of a certain profession, such as the Toque worn by chefs. Some hats have religious functions, such as the mitres worn by Bishops and the turban worn by Sikhs.

Hat (disambiguation)

A hat is an item of clothing worn on the head.

Hat may also refer to:

Hať

Hať, formerly Haš is a village in the Moravian-Silesian Region of the Czech Republic. It is part of micro-region Hlučínsko. It has around 2,500 inhabitants.

Hat (album)

Hat is an album by British musician Davy Graham, released in 1969.

In his Allmusic review, critic Ritchie Unterberger stated "There's no such thing as a bad Graham album from the 1960s. While Hat isn't necessarily the first one you should dig into, it offers the standard pleasures that you expect from his records: excellent, feverishly imaginative acoustic guitar playing; vibrant jazz-blues arrangements; and covers of blues numbers, Paul Simon, and Lennon-McCartney. He's just as capable of good-time blues (" I'm Ready") and a folk cover of " Getting Better" from Sgt. Pepper as dark, slightly dissonant instrumentals with a modal/Eastern flavor. As is the case with most of his '60s albums, it's very hard to find, especially in the U.S., where Graham did not have a record deal."

Wiktionary

hat

n. 1 A covering for the head, often in the approximate form of a cone or a cylinder closed at its top end, and sometimes having a brim and other decoration. 2 (lb en figuratively) A particular role or capacity that a person might fill. 3 (lb en figuratively) Any receptacle from which numbers/names are pulled out in a lottery. 4 # (lb en figuratively by extension) The lottery or draw itself. 5 (lb en video games) A hat switch. 6 (lb en typography non-standard rare) = (l en háček)

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Hat

Hat \Hat\ (h[aum]t), a. Hot. [Obs.]
--Chaucer.

Hat

Hat \Hat\, sing. pres. of Hote to be called. Cf. Hatte. [Obs.] ``That one hat abstinence.''
--Piers Plowman.

Hat

Hat \Hat\ (h[a^]t), n. [AS. h[ae]t, h[ae]tt; akin to Dan. hat, Sw. hatt, Icel. hattr a hat, h["o]ttr hood, D. hoed hat, G. hut, OHG. huot, and prob. to L. cassis helmet. [root]13. Cf. Hood.] A covering for the head; esp., one with a crown and brim, made of various materials, and worn by men or women for protecting the head from the sun or weather, or for ornament.

Hat block, a block on which hats are formed or dressed.

To pass around the hat, to take up a collection of voluntary contributions, which are often received in a hat. [Colloq.]
--Lowell.

WordNet

hat

  1. v. put on or wear a hat; "He was unsuitably hatted"

  2. furnish with a hat

  3. [also: hatting, hatted]

hat

  1. n. headdress that protects the head from bad weather; has shaped crown and usually a brim [syn: chapeau, lid]

  2. an informal term for a person's role; "he took off his politician's hat and talked frankly"

  3. [also: hatting, hatted]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

hat

Old English hæt "hat, head covering," from Proto-Germanic *hattuz "hood, cowl" (cognates: Frisian hat, Old Norse hattr), from PIE root *kadh- "cover, protect" (cognates: Lithuanian kudas "tuft or crest of a bird," Latin cassis "helmet"). Now, "head covering with a more or less horizontal brim." To throw one's hat in the ring was originally (1847) to take up a challenge in prize-fighting. To eat one's hat is said to have been originally To eat Old Rowley's [Charles II's] hat.

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "hat".

The party had come aboard without waiting to be invited, their leader stepping forward with his hat in his hand.

She noticed that he wore his soft brown hat carelessly on the side of his head and that his accent was flat.

After having sat a few minutes, he took off his hat and addressed himself to the commons in very extraordinary terms.

The gallant officers, now realizing for the first time that a girl--and a pretty one--was one of the passengers of the big aeroplane, waved their hats and bowed profoundly.

Pulling his hat low for shade, Mat searched the road for a woman, for anyone, mounted or afoot, and his heart sank.

The black three-cornered hat, broidered with gold, and adorned with three ostrich tips of red and a white and blue aigrette, was, however, the glory of his bravery.

Either would have given up his epidermis to make for her an Easter hat more cheerfully than the ostrich gives up his tip or the aigrette lays down its life.

Dorraine was all in white as well: stole, cossack hat, and a muff big enough, it occurred to Alacrity in passing, to hold those cute derringers plus a few landmines for luck.

What Alec could see of his face beneath the brim of his battered slouch hat was dark with stubble and dust.

As for Alker, he had only a hat, a shabby brown one, that had stayed on his head during the struggle out front.

As minister of Kirk Aller he was the metropolitan of the company, and as became a townsman he wore decent black with bands, and boasted a hat.

In a grey cloak and a round, grey hat with gold cords, followed closely by two shadowy attendant figures, he stepped briskly amain, eager to open those gates across the path of his ambition, locked against him hitherto by the very hands from which he now went to receive the key.

Wearing her arms inspectorate hat, she was all too familiar with the effects of americium bombs: nuclear weapons made with an isotope denser and more fissile than plutonium, more stable than californium.

He recognized the golden locks and wide-brimmed hat of Captain Tyler Argosy, an old friend, and an army man to the core.

She replaced the receiver, picked up her capacious knitting bag, gave her hat brim a final pat in front of the mirror, and swung the wooden shed door to without noticing Asey standing outside.