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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

harm

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
damage/harm to the environment
▪ A lot of chemicals used in industry cause harm to the environment.
do more harm than good (=used to say that something had a bad effect rather than a good one)
▪ I followed his advice but it did more harm than good.
grievous bodily harm
harm/damage the economy (=make it less successful)
▪ Sanctions have damaged the economy.
harm/damage the environment
▪ The government insists that the dam will not harm the environment.
incalculable harm/damage/suffering etc
▪ The outbreak of hostilities will cause incalculable misery.
keep...from harm
▪ His only thought was to keep the child from harm.
mean no harm/offence/disrespect (=not intend to harm, offend etc someone)
▪ I’m sure he didn’t mean any harm.
not do (sb) any harm also do (sb) no harm (=not have a bad effect on something or someone)
▪ One or two chocolate cookies won’t do you any harm.
not do (sb) any harm also do (sb) no harm (=not have a bad effect on something or someone)
▪ One or two chocolate cookies won’t do you any harm.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
bodily
▪ Hazlett was also charged with reckless driving causing grievous bodily harm to two people.
▪ Since grievous bodily harm can be committed by an omission it would be strange if assault and battery could not be.
▪ The conduct may be either causing a wound or causing grievous bodily harm.
▪ She also denies 11 alternative charges of causing grievous bodily harm.
▪ One has just come out of prison after doing two years for bodily harm.
▪ In court Diaz admitted charges of inflicting grievous bodily harm and affray and Walker admitted affray and assault causing actual bodily harm.
causing
▪ The conduct may be either causing a wound or causing grievous bodily harm.
▪ Arthurs, 33, of Exeter, was jailed for nine months after admitting causing grievous bodily harm.
▪ The intention is that the producer should insure the product against its potential for causing harm.
▪ The youths were neither causing damage nor harm.
▪ If their discharges are seen to be causing harm they can be liable in the civil courts.
▪ The bad senses cluster around the notion of deliberately causing harm to another being or entity.
▪ Jones, 29, of Sutton in Ashfield, denies murder, attempted murder and causing grievous bodily harm.
▪ We have to help them live in the world without causing harm to others.
grievous
▪ Since grievous bodily harm can be committed by an omission it would be strange if assault and battery could not be.
▪ Arthurs, 33, of Exeter, was jailed for nine months after admitting causing grievous bodily harm.
▪ A local man who has been charged with grievous bodily harm will face further questioning today before he appears before magistrates.
▪ Another 40 people are facing charges of riot and conspiracy to cause grievous bodily harm.
▪ In court Diaz admitted charges of inflicting grievous bodily harm and affray and Walker admitted affray and assault causing actual bodily harm.
▪ It is claimed Metclafe inflicted grievous bodily harm to a man and then attempted to pervert the course of justice.
▪ He will appear in court today charged with grievous bodily harm and intimidation.
▪ A man has been charged with grievous bodily harm and will appear before Swindon Magistrates tomorrow morning.
irreparable
▪ However, the didactic goal usually does irreparable harm to the characterization of the dramatis personae.
physical
▪ They are convicted of physical harm or damage infrequently and they are in general petty and trivial offenders.
▪ They claim notification exposes offenders who have served prison time to vigilantism, harassment, physical harm, job-loss and public shame.
▪ He has made threats of physical harm to himself and others.
▪ The researcher is asked to attempt to guarantee that the subject will be protected from physical or psychological harm.
▪ There is therefore no direct inference ticket from physical harm to harm normatively defined.
▪ They were afraid he'd turn violent and do one of them some actual physical harm.
▪ In severe depression apathy can lead to neglect, irritability to physical harm, and depressive delusions to infanticide.
▪ His ring classicism has always argued so persuasively against excessive physical harm, his pride was beyond anything but a regal exit.
psychological
▪ Maternity, or additional offspring, may force upon the woman a distressful life and future. Psychological harm may be imminent.
▪ The researcher is asked to attempt to guarantee that the subject will be protected from physical or psychological harm.
real
▪ It does not look as though any real harm has been done.
▪ He would not do her any real harm.
▪ They rarely mean real harm, and go too far only infrequently.
▪ At least I can say that I do these old guys no real or lasting harm.
▪ He wondered now how he might explain to Beth that his stepfather saw no real harm in what Matthew had done.
▪ In which case there's no real harm been done, has there?
serious
▪ A few weeks back here in the World won't do my career serious harm.
▪ Detain any person who poses an imminent threat of death or serious bodily harm.
▪ The crime will depend on whether the wound was serious harm or not.
▪ A child may suffer serious or permanent harm and even death as a result of neglect.
▪ Yet if you can see it still protruding, you can retrieve it before serious harm is caused.
▪ Actual bodily harm need not be serious harm and it has been held to include a hysterical and nervous condition.
▪ Actual bodily harm must mean something less than serious harm.
▪ How serious must the harm be?
■ VERB
come
▪ She had come to no harm, but that was beside the point.
▪ Your body simply does not need sugar and you could live without and come to no harm.
▪ The dish can of course be reheated without coming to any harm.
▪ In fact those worries are unfounded and the pond will come to no harm while they are enjoying themselves.
▪ Chantal will come to no harm.
▪ Can I honestly reassure her that she will come to no harm in pursuing this phenomenon?
▪ He wondered if Rufus had children and if so did he worry about them coming to terrible harm the way Adam worried?
do
▪ On the other hand, she was gorgeous and it could do no harm to say hello.
▪ Most people have been exposed to it, but if your-immune system is intact the protozoa will seldom do harm.
▪ And it is clear that his association with new Labour initially did him no harm.
▪ A terrible serpent guarded the Fleece, but she would lull it to sleep so that it would do them no harm.
▪ A few days or weeks of not wanting to think about it will do no harm.
▪ It was like a natural supplement and, I am sure, did no harm and may have done some good.
▪ When taken in the prescribed manner they have never been shown to do any harm.
inflict
▪ Stripped of his power to inflict harm on me, he seemed terribly ordinary.
▪ Whatever their number, with the technology available to them, they can inflict major harm.
▪ He was charged with unlawfully and maliciously inflicting grievous bodily harm and with assault occasioning actual bodily harm.
▪ Thus, the government has no compelling justification for inflicting such harm.
▪ Claire and Wynn were also charged with conspiracy to inflict grievous bodily harm on Cotter.
▪ Women, it would seem, should be governed by some biological instinct that prevents them from inflicting harm.
▪ In court Diaz admitted charges of inflicting grievous bodily harm and affray and Walker admitted affray and assault causing actual bodily harm.
intend
▪ In this conventional hierarchy, it is morally worse to intend harm than to be indifferent whether harm results from one's behaviour.
▪ James Clarke, defending, claimed there was a lot of confusion and Mitchell did not intend any harm.
keep
▪ She gave him her veil, which would keep him from harm as long as he was in the sea.
▪ I realise you were desperate to protect him and keep him from harm.
▪ His only thought is to keep the boy from harm.
mean
▪ We mean you no harm but Monsieur Ralemberg is not the man he appears.
▪ But really, he meant no harm.
▪ Mrs Sugden meant no harm to anyone, but neither had she the intelligence to be really kind.
▪ Rip assured the man that he meant no harm, but was just looking for his neighbors.
▪ He hadn't meant any harm but his few words had set her against him.
▪ That coach, as did Zoeller, said he meant no harm.
▪ He didn't mean any harm, he just wanted to give them back.
▪ He knew his father was a good man, a kind man, honest, meaning no harm to anyone.
occasioning
▪ He was charged with unlawfully and maliciously inflicting grievous bodily harm and with assault occasioning actual bodily harm.
▪ Taxi driver Mason admitted assault occasioning actual bodily harm on January 3 and arson between January 2 and 5.
▪ Section 47 creates the offence of assault occasioning actual bodily harm.
▪ Garrington admitted assault occasioning actual bodily harm on Ian Dixon and he was fined £50.
▪ In March 1989 the police officer was served with summonses alleging two offences of assault occasioning actual bodily harm.
▪ In Spratt, though interpretations vary, the Court of Appeal seems to have required intentionally or recklessly occasioning actual bodily harm.
▪ He also admitted assault occasioning actual bodily harm.
suffer
▪ With it he could taste anything she gave him and suffer no harm.
▪ As adults we are naturally protective of children and do not want them to suffer harm.
▪ A child may suffer serious or permanent harm and even death as a result of neglect.
▪ The coach did not in fact crash and if he had remained on it he would have suffered no harm.
▪ First, the applicant must show that the child is actually suffering or likely to suffer harm which is significant.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
not harm/touch a hair of/on sb's head
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Several people were injured, but most escaped harm.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A few weeks back here in the World won't do my career serious harm.
▪ He knew his father was a good man, a kind man, honest, meaning no harm to anyone.
▪ I had never done him any harm, yet I seemed to be the object of a deliberate campaign.
▪ No great harm in that, from a cameraman; or so I thought at the time.
▪ Stripped of his power to inflict harm on me, he seemed terribly ordinary.
▪ The trouble is that, though the harm so far may be slight, the legitimate anxiety is not.
▪ Unless you have a specific allergy, there is no great harm in taking something to relieve an isolated headache.
▪ Very small amounts can be dealt with by the body causing no long term harm.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
never
▪ All her feelings had been for Gerry, with the coal-pitted hands, who had never harmed a soul.
▪ She never harmed anyone when she was alive.
▪ I know not what you people think of his kind, but he has never harmed a soul that I know of.
▪ Each was bound to help and never harm the other.
▪ I used to believe she would always protect me, I was certain she would never harm me.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
not harm/touch a hair of/on sb's head
sb wouldn't hurt/harm a fly
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Any scandal will certainly harm the company's reputation.
▪ The most important consideration is that the environment is not harmed.
▪ There are fears that a trade agreement will harm the economy.
▪ These companies fish for tuna using methods that do not harm dolphins.
▪ These new export restrictions are sure to harm the economy.
▪ Walking out without giving any notice will only harm your career.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As Polycarp prayed in silence, the flames encircled him, without harming him.
▪ Has it helped or harmed recipients?
▪ He would do anything, I think, to harm Arthur, even ally himself with the Saxons.
▪ If it was going to harm our sales it would have done it by now.
▪ The doom of all who harmed them was certain.
▪ When a national industry is harmed by imports, governments can raise tariffs without violating trade agreement.
Wikipedia

Harm

Harm is a moral and legal concept.

Bernard Gert construes harms as any of the following:

Joel Feinberg gives an account of harms as setbacks to interests. He distinguishes welfare interests from ulterior interests. Hence on his view there are two kinds of harms.

Welfare interests are

interests in the continuance for a foreseeable interval of one's life, and the interests in one's own physical health and vigor, the integrity and normal functioning of one's body, the absence of absorbing pain and suffering or grotesque disfigurement, minimal intellectual acuity, emotional stability, the absence of groundless anxieties and resentments, the capacity to engage normally in social intercourse and to enjoy and maintain friendships, at least minimal income and financial security, a tolerable social and physical environment, and a certain amount of freedom from interference and coercion.

Ulterior interests are "a person's more ultimate goals and aspirations," such as "producing good novels or works of art, solving a crucial scientific problem, achieving high political office, successfully raising a family . . .".

Harm (comics)

Harm is a fictional supervillain in the DC Comics universe. He first appeared in Young Justice #4 (January 1999).

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Harm

Harm \Harm\ (h[aum]rm), n. [OE. harm, hearm, AS. hearm; akin to OS. harm, G. harm grief, Icel. harmr, Dan. harme, Sw. harm; cf. OSlav. & Russ. sram' shame, Skr. [,c]rama toil, fatigue.]

  1. Injury; hurt; damage; detriment; misfortune.

  2. That which causes injury, damage, or loss.

    We, ignorant of ourselves, Beg often our own harms.
    --Shak.

    Syn: Mischief; evil; loss; injury. See Mischief.

Harm

Harm \Harm\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Harmed (h[aum]rmd); p. pr. & vb. n. Harming.] [OE. harmen, AS. hearmian. See Harm, n.] To hurt; to injure; to damage; to wrong.

Though yet he never harmed me.
--Shak.

No ground of enmity between us known Why he should mean me ill or seek to harm.
--Milton.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

harm

Old English hearm "hurt, evil, grief, pain, insult," from Proto-Germanic *harmaz (cognates: Old Saxon harm, Old Norse harmr, Old Frisian herm "insult; pain," Old High German harm, German Harm "grief, sorrow, harm"), from PIE *kormo- "pain."

harm

Old English hearmian "to hurt" (see harm (n.)). It has ousted Old English skeþþan "scathe" in all but a few senses. Related: Harmed; harming.

WordNet

harm

  1. n. any physical damage to the body caused by violence or accident or fracture etc. [syn: injury, hurt, trauma]

  2. the occurrence of a change for the worse [syn: damage, impairment]

  3. the act of damaging something or someone [syn: damage, hurt, scathe]

harm

v. cause or do harm to; "These pills won't harm your system"

Wiktionary

harm

n. injury; hurt; damage; detriment; misfortune. vb. To cause injury to another; to hurt; to cause damage to something.

Usage examples of "harm".

She did not want to harm the bird, but the thing had already bloodied her and would not back off, so she conjured a minor Venca spell, catching the bird as it plummeted down, insensate.

Some moderate Federalists and old friends warned Adams he could be doing himself and the country great harm by remaining too long in seclusion.

Then he announced that I was Amra, the Lion, and his friend, and no harm should come to me.

I felt such confidence in the substantial justice of the charges which I advanced against her, that I considered them to be a safeguard and an assurance that no harm could ever arise from the freest exposition of what I used to call Anglican principles.

I did not know all that the Fathers had said, but I felt that, even when their tenets happened to differ from the Anglican, no harm could come of reporting them.

There is nothing your world can do to harm me, other than hinder my parameters and areas of exploration and scientific discovery.

Even though the young Arii had seen me he would not have raised his hand to harm me, for he too would gladly see the ship cast away and broken upon the reef, so that he need not leave my cousin Alrema.

Atoka, my brother, because he feared you might come to harm at the hands of the Wyandots.

The Mahars had offered fabulous rewards for the capture of any one of us alive, and at the same time had threatened to inflict the direst punishment upon whomever should harm us.

I would be able to do this automatic writing thing, but I knew there was no harm in trying.

Harm the Baka Ban Mana, Harm Sister Verna, or Harm me, and the truce will be ended, and I promise you we will have war!

They harmed no one, not himself, his wife, his children or his guests, Goodall liked to frighten by covering his face with bees over his face like a beard.

And, against all reason, I was inclined to believe Bloch when he said he meant me no harm.

As yesterday most ably demonstrated, any ignorant fool with a torch can precipitate broadscale harm.

But if a goldfish went woof woof, it would be an empty threat, because what harm could a goldfish do you, even a very large, pumped-up on steroids kind of goldfish who had possibly studied all the Sonny Chiba films and knew a lot of spiffy moves?