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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

hard

I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cold/hard heart (=used about someone who does not feel sympathy for other people)
▪ It takes a hard heart not to be moved by these images of suffering.
a difficult/hard/tough decision
▪ In the end I took the difficult decision to retire early.
a dull/hard/heavy thud
▪ There was a dull thud as the box hit the floor.
a hard chair (=not comfortable)
▪ I sat on a hard chair in the corridor and waited.
a hard day (=difficult and tiring)
▪ Sit down – you look as though you’ve had a hard day.
a hard kick
▪ A hard kick to the knee could cause a lot of damage.
a hard stare (=very steady, with a lot of attention)
▪ As he passed, he gave us a hard stare.
a hard/heavy frost (=a severe frost)
▪ We’ve had three continuous nights of hard frost.
a hard/powerful punch
▪ My stomach took a couple of hard punches.
a hard/soft cover
▪ I never buy books in hard cover – they’re much more expensive.
a hard/soft wood
▪ Oak is a hard wood.
a hard/strong currency (=currency from a country with a strong economy)
▪ They accept American dollars and other hard currencies.
a tough/hard battle
▪ He faces a tough battle to prove his innocence.
be badly/severely/hard hit
▪ The company has been hard hit by the drop in consumer confidence.
be difficult/hard to judge
▪ The economic results of the reforms are difficult to judge.
be hard of hearing (=not be able to hear well)
▪ The subtitling service is intended for people who are hard of hearing.
be hard to bear
▪ The situation was very hard to bear.
be hard/difficult to imagine
▪ It’s hard to imagine the suffering she must have gone through.
be hard/easy/impossible etc to please
▪ She’s hard to please. Everything has to be perfect.
bit...hard
▪ Nina pushed her fist into her mouth and bit down hard.
blowing hard
▪ A cold breeze was blowing hard.
brake sharply/hard (=brake quickly)
▪ He braked sharply to avoid the dog.
breathe heavily/hard (=breathe loudly especially after exercise)
▪ He’d been running and he was breathing hard.
come down hard on
▪ We need to come down hard on young offenders.
cracking down hard
▪ The police are cracking down hard on violent crime.
difficult/hard
▪ Some of the questions in the last section were very difficult.
difficult/hard/easy etc to guess
▪ It’s hard to guess his age because he dyes his hair.
difficult/hard/impossible etc to credit
▪ We found his statement hard to credit.
easy/difficult/hard etc to follow
▪ The plot is a little difficult to follow.
find it hard/easy/difficult etc (to do sth)
▪ Hyperactive children find it difficult to concentrate.
firm/soft/hard etc mattress
▪ an old, lumpy mattress
hard bargaining
▪ The 4% pay raise was the result of some hard bargaining.
hard by
▪ in a house hard by the city gate
hard cash
hard cheese
▪ Use a hard cheese such as Cheddar for grating.
hard copy
hard core
▪ the hard core of the Communist party
hard court
hard currency
hard disk
hard drive
hard drugs (also class A drugs British English) (= strong drugs such as heroin, cocaine etc)
▪ He was in prison for dealing hard drugs.
hard drugs
hard evidence (=very clear evidence which proves that something is true)
▪ They have no hard evidence to support their claim.
hard facts (=information that is definitely true and can be proven)
▪ His theory is supported by hard facts.
hard graft
▪ Our success has been due to sheer hard graft.
hard hat
hard labour
hard muscles (=strong, firm muscles)
▪ the hard muscles of his back and shoulders
hard of hearing
hard porn
hard rock
hard sell
hard shoulder
hard site
hard slog
▪ months of hard slog
hard slog
▪ a long hard slog uphill
hard thinking
▪ Over the next two days a lot of hard thinking went into the campaign.
hard to come by
▪ Jobs were hard to come by.
hard to swallow (=difficult to believe)
▪ I found his story a bit hard to swallow.
hard to take
▪ Liz found his criticisms hard to take.
hard up
▪ I’m a bit hard up at the moment.
hard
▪ It hadn’t rained for weeks and the earth was hard.
hard
▪ The path has a hard surface suitable for wheelchairs and pushchairs.
hard
▪ It’s been very hard work, but I’ve loved every moment of it.
hard (=containing a lot of calcium)
▪ Hard water is formed as rainwater passes down through layers of limestone.
hard
▪ She was trying hard not to show her impatience.
hard (=with a lot of mental effort)
▪ I bet, if you think really hard, you can think of something to do.
hard/difficult to pin down
▪ The flavour was hard to pin down.
hard/difficult to resist
▪ The temptation to follow them was hard to resist.
hard/difficult to stomach
▪ Rob found Cathy’s attitude hard to stomach.
hard/floppy/A etc drive
hard/rough/slow etc going
▪ I’m getting the work done, but it’s slow going.
hard/strenuous/vigorous exercise (=involving a lot of physical effort)
▪ Pregnant women should avoid strenuous exercise.
Hit...hard
Hit the ball as hard as you can.
it is difficult/hard to cope
▪ We were finding it difficult to cope financially.
it is difficult/hard/impossible to exaggerate sth (=used to say that something cannot be made to seem more important etc than it already is)
▪ It is difficult to exaggerate the strength of people’s feelings on this matter.
it is hard/difficult to fault sb/sth
▪ You might not like O'Donnel’s arrogance, but it’s hard to fault what he does on the field.
it is hard/difficult to overestimate sth (=used to emphasize that something is very important)
▪ It is hard to overestimate the effect the war has had on these children.
it rains heavily/hard (=a lot of water comes down)
▪ It was raining heavily when we arrived in New York.
listen carefully/intently/hard etc
▪ The whole class was listening attentively.
▪ Liz stood still and listened hard very carefully.
long and hard (=hard, for a long time, before making a decision)
▪ I thought long and hard about taking the role.
long hard look (=examine very carefully)
▪ This month, take a long hard look at where your money is going.
push...hard
▪ Encourage your kids to try new things, but try not to push them too hard.
pushing hard
▪ He was pushing hard for welfare reform.
severe/hard/harsh (=very cold)
▪ In a hard winter, many birds starve.
stare hard/intently (=very steadily, with a lot of attention)
▪ She stared hard at him for a moment.
swallowed hard
▪ Leo swallowed hard and walked into the room.
take a tough/firm/hard line on sth
▪ The school takes a very tough line on drugs.
the hard/easy part
▪ Deciding what you're going to cook is the easy part.
tough/hard
▪ He said he expected the race to be tough.
try your best/hardest (=make as much effort as possible)
▪ Try your best to block out other distractions.
work...hard
▪ I’m going to have to work really hard to pass these exams.
working hard
▪ The company is working hard to improve its image.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
case
▪ Epiphone Sheraton, sunburst, including hard case, £250.
▪ A hard case, he thought.
▪ Of course they will, but in hard cases judges must make controversial judgments of political morality whichever conception of law they hold.
▪ These are, indeed, hard cases to win.
▪ A hard case calls for decision.
▪ Conventionalism fails here as it fails in cross-section, in explaining how particular hard cases like our samples are debated and decided.
▪ Also old but usable Jazz Bass hard case.
▪ Fender Strat, white with hard case, £175.
cash
▪ Intellectuals were called on to transform their knowledge into hard cash.
▪ Luckily, the chatter of cold hard cash later persuaded the state to sell the name to the highest bidder.
▪ John's role was to get together as much hard cash as possible.
▪ Two Model Village awards will not suffice our merchants for cold, hard cash.
▪ Chamois and crystal hunters began to convert their mountain skills into hard cash by becoming mountain guides for the more adventurous tourists.
▪ The social types turned out en masse to cheer on their friends and to put a little hard cash on the line.
▪ For the City has not been prepared to back his business with hard cash.
▪ There was very little hard cash.
copy
▪ The Stand-alone Hard Copy system allows the user to produce, on suitable media, hard copies of online modules.
▪ A hard copy map of their course was spread out over the console before him.
▪ The hard copy volume is deleted from the hard copy directory regardless of whether it has been accepted or rejected.
▪ Note that modules can only be hard copied if they are online and can not be nominated for hard copy individually.
▪ This utility allows you to alter images in such a way as to produce the best possible hard copy from your printer.
▪ These hard copy keywords must be entered as the final keywords in the configuration file.
▪ The full size terminal can store up to 37 Prestel pages in memory for review or printing to hard copy.
▪ Three departments attempt to keep the use of hard copy to a minimum by extensive use of online services.
core
▪ The other kind of move that is ruled out is one that violates the hard core, as we have already mentioned.
▪ There are not, however, too many hard core pumpernickel types left, certainly not enough to support small bakeries.
▪ The hard core of Newtonian physics is comprised of Newton's laws of motion plus his law of gravitational attraction.
▪ I believed the drill instructor was hard core, nose to the grindstone, always screaming and shouting.
▪ The plotters represented the hard core of the right wing.
▪ I would like to add to this that we could totally eradicate the hard core of the crisis by the year 2000.
▪ Order is maintained by the inviolability of the hard core of a programme and by the positive heuristic that accompanies it.
▪ Others are on the run with their families, leaving a hard core to take their guns and guard their property.
currency
▪ They could be purchased with hard currency but not roubles.
▪ Pizza is the hard currency of our relationship with these children.
▪ From Sept. 15 foreigners were forbidden to export scarce consumer goods, unless purchased for hard currency.
▪ No tax is involved in these countries, and holding the plan offshore means you can use hard currency.
▪ Repatriation of profits would be possible by converting roubles into hard currency on the new exchanges.
▪ Trade with other former members of Comecon is to be in hard currency, if it takes place at all.
▪ Would it not continue to need the hard currency and expertise which a westernised Hong Kong attracted?
▪ According to the Treaty, non-signatories would have to pay hard currency for their imports from the new Soviet Union.
day
▪ Next time we'd come prepared for longer, harder days.
▪ Floral print After a hard day in the garden, come in and relax on beautiful tapestry cushions designed by Kaffe Fassett.
▪ And the few shillings earned was more than welcome in those hard days.
▪ A bit of companionship with fellow climbers and walkers is just the job at the end of a hard day.
decision
▪ He made the hard decision to abandon the Old World.
▪ They say it must have been such a hard decision.
▪ But it was a hard decision.
▪ This, too, was a hard decision because Gary Stevens merited prime consideration.
▪ In old age Ramsey looked back and knew that this was the hardest decision of his life.
▪ The officials who are retiring or were defeated had to make hard decisions after the flood.
▪ The hard decisions need to be taken early.
▪ Apart from this, the 1994 budget's main feature is to put off some hard decisions on weapons-procurement.
disk
▪ It tells you which files belonging to which programs are on your hard disk and it can also compress files.
▪ The hard disk drive is fast, too, with its own on-board cache.
▪ A hard disk enables the microcomputer to store vast amounts of information on disk.
▪ Grimmer agents were saying it was a case of an entirely lost hard disk.
▪ So they use a section of that old hard disk to store the overflow.
▪ Some one has suffered a trashed hard disk or corrupted file or lost an important configuration setting.
drive
▪ Is the hard drive from a reputable manufacturer?
▪ It will also move a program from one hard drive to another or from one computer to another.
▪ In the next window, browse to the file's location on your hard drive and select it, then click Next.
▪ The hard drive is slower than the one on the Dell.
▪ This includes the serial and parallel ports, the hard drive, the screen and finally, the whole machine.
▪ The other kind is disk storage, commonly on a hard drive or floppy disk.
▪ It is important to keep your disks in order, especially hard drives which hold lots of information.
▪ A cookie is simply a small data file on your hard drive.
drug
▪ Dealing in drugs, particularly hard drugs, is not an activity condoned by any of the community organisations on the estate.
▪ No topless dancers, no hard drugs, no trial.
▪ Our reporters uncovered a generation who have been sucked into a dark underworld of solvent abuse and hard drugs.
▪ Tobacco and alcohol are far more harmful than the so-called hard drugs, heroin and cocaine.
▪ Is it fair to equate alcohol with hard drugs?
▪ He accepted that legalisation would not necessarily greatly increase addiction to hard drugs such as cocaine and heroin.
▪ The linking of alcohol and hard drugs confuses health education messages.
▪ She warned that even the first injection of hard drugs can kill.
edge
▪ X100's body will be rounded and sculpted, with soft, flowing lines and no hard edges or chrome highlights.
▪ The demonstrations, meanwhile, began to take on a harder edge in recent weeks.
▪ She remains gutsy throughout presenting a harder edge to previous Ritas I have seen.
▪ He had a hard edge to his voice.
▪ Flats are suitable for larger strokes, holding a good charge of pigment and are good for hard edges.
▪ Her smile broadened, lost its hard edge.
▪ These can be made tighter by running the material over a hard edge to squeeze the coils.
▪ Touched the hard edge of diamonds.
evidence
▪ Developers and investors seek to reduce risk, and a key influence on their thinking will be hard evidence of success.
▪ There is no hard evidence of files spirited away and even if they were, nobody knows whether they contain anything sinister.
▪ This was a pseudo-historical theory for which there was no hard evidence.
▪ The board reported in March that there is little hard evidence about the amount of this new type of fraud.
▪ But, again, the commission found no hard evidence that Mr Wahid had lied or misused the money.
▪ There are surely many answers to this question, not one of which is impeccably established by hard evidence.
▪ At present, there is considerable speculation about developments in the Corridor but little hard evidence.
▪ To what extent is it founded on hard evidence?
fact
▪ We supply the hard facts so you can do-it-yourself.
▪ The hard fact is that computers are complicated, and always will be.
▪ Cultural differences Cultural differences are often the hardest facts for expatriates to accept.
▪ The time zone changes as we went west further increased our sensation that time was no longer a hard fact.
▪ So what are the hard facts?
▪ But in the mutable world of the modern organization, major decisions are seldom made solely on the basis of hard facts.
▪ It was a greatly respected and slightly feared publication, dealing in hard fact, abrasive as Maggie herself was abrasive.
▪ Ultimately, the answers lie in the hard fact that racism and sexism remain powerful currents in our national life.
hat
▪ You haven't got hard hats on.
▪ If hydrogen sulfide or some other poisonous gas is detected, Donahue dons an airtight breathing device and a hard hat.
▪ However, cyclists make a good example because they too are starting to wear hard hats.
▪ When no vapors are present, he simply wears the hard hat.
▪ All men on site will be required to wear hard hats and safety boots at all times within the designated areas.
▪ Radio across town were handing out hard hats for a press tour of their nearly completed Beverly Hills facility.
▪ A hard hat can protect you from having a metal spike go through your skull and into your brain.
▪ I had to put my hard hat on and go to work.
hit
▪ Graham Cowdrey kept the runs flowing with a hard hit 88.
▪ Particularly hard hit would be relatives of immigrants legally in the United States.
▪ The number of job offerings was down 11% from the previous year, with studio teaching positions particularly hard hit.
▪ New Jersey and New York will be especially hard hit.
▪ Andy, whose estranged wife Fergie has caused much of the dismay, could be the hardest hit.
▪ Countries not so reliant on oil because of lack of industrial development can be hard hit indirectly.
▪ Among the hardest hit has been Aerospace, which faces a tough time over the next two to three years.
▪ Californians have been particularly hard hit.
labour
▪ And hard labour ... the railway navvies remembered by a rock band.
▪ Charged with obscenity the magistrates gave them six months hard labour each.
▪ Workers who lose their jobs are sent to farm camps, along with bureaucrats doing two weeks' hard labour.
▪ The Vote reported one incident of child assault in Surrey, where a man was sentenced to only four months hard labour.
▪ But the hard labour for criminals which replaced judicial execution was so appalling that it was in effect a living death.
▪ However, an extra month's hard labour made good the loss.
▪ He was given six months' hard labour after he refused on principle to pay the fine.
▪ Theo took a shorter journey-to Wormwood Scrubs, where he did four months' hard labour.
life
▪ He said he'd had a hard life.
▪ He had a hard life on the island.
▪ She married him, had two children in two years and, she says, endured a hard life.
▪ They led a very hard life, always hungry, sometimes without food for several days.
▪ She too is seventy but looks like a thirty-four-year-old who led a very hard life.
▪ Graham had a hard life from childhood.
▪ She knew that Jonnie had had a hard life.
line
▪ Use a cotton bud to blend the colours together, so there are no hard lines.
▪ But regulators are taking a harder line these days.
▪ Scott ignored his insult and continued walking, his face set in hard lines.
▪ I have suffered as a result of this merciless hard line plenty of times myself.
▪ For both sides in this conflict have returned to the hardest of hard lines.
▪ But the Clinton administration is still taking a hard line.
▪ De Gaulle took a hard line towards the strike.
▪ But both sides are taking a hard line.
look
▪ This can only be assessed by examining the meaning of hard look more closely.
▪ He ignored her and threw a hard look at me: I better not tell.
▪ I gave him a hard look.
▪ Clarisa gave her a hard look.
▪ She wanted some one outside Orkney to take a long, hard look at what was happening within the islands.
▪ The hard look that seems wrong on a face so young was suddenly gone.
▪ The next stage is to take a long, hard look at yourself.
▪ The next time you see a personal computer, take a long, hard look.
man
▪ Of course Jeeves would disapprove: but then he is a hard man to please.
▪ He had to be diplomat, psychologist, hard man, soft man, entrepreneur, spiritual leader, general and peacekeeper.
▪ But Cooper is more than a hard man.
▪ In the video Jones is, in the main, observing rather than advocating the ruthless antics of the hard men.
▪ Secondly, the band launched heavy metal hard man Ted Nugent, one of rock's more notable characters.
▪ Unlike everybody else, however, the hard man did not look up the neighbourhood exorcist in Thompson's Local Directory.
▪ It was all pleasantly noisy without any air of aggression, there were no yobs or self-styled hard men among the customers.
▪ Wimbledon's hard man ran across the pitch to point threateningly at Middlesbrough assistant manager John Pickering.
part
▪ The harder parts gave a much more satisfactory finish with clean shiny cutter marks even in the interlocking grain.
▪ In fact, the hardest part is getting the printer out of the box.
▪ The hard part was in the years to come.
▪ The creation of these lunar ephemerides turned out to be the hardest part of the problem.
▪ The hard part is sorting the good memories from the bad.
▪ The hard part would be working it into her schedule.
▪ The hardest part is finding a provider that supports it.
▪ That had been the hard part, immensely hard, getting the permission.
rock
▪ It is very difficult dealing with fractures and dislocations which have happened on fairly hard rock climbs.
▪ Its overhanging walls provide a number of hard rock climbs.
▪ They still play honest hard rock, but now it sounds fresher and has thousands of hard edges.
▪ The harder rocks stand out as ledges, the softer ones form steep slopes.
▪ In an area with such rapid changes in temperature as to erode hard rock into sand, soft shells would not have survived.
▪ Erosion of hard rocks is usually very different.
▪ Differential erosion of the rocks has resulted in the hard rocks being left as peaks separated by deeply eroded valleys and ravines.
shoulder
▪ She wanted to give in, weaken, her eyes closing and her fingers curling on his hard shoulders.
▪ He left her on the hard shoulder, near Epping, Essex, saying she would only have to wait 15 minutes.
▪ The two children, Mark in Georgina's arms, were spotted along the hard shoulder.
▪ I pictured a man taking leave of his motor; wobbling from the fast lane towards the hard shoulder.
▪ He pulled up on the hard shoulder, switched off and got out.
▪ The body of the pregnant housewife was found near the M-50 motorway after her car broke down on the hard shoulder.
thing
▪ Well, it is the hardest thing for humans to do, Lord.
▪ The hardest thing about snowshoeing is getting the tethered shoe attached securely to your feet.
▪ They usually seem disappointed when I confess that the hardest thing to deal with is lack of sleep.
▪ The hardest thing I ever did was leave.
▪ How he could just sit there in that silence was the hardest thing I have ever tried to figure out.
▪ The hardest thing for most women to accept now is the white shoe.
▪ Mystification is simple; clarity is the hardest thing of all.
▪ In fact, the hardest thing for a great many people is to win.
time
▪ By Hugh Hebert COMEDY-thrillers could have a hard time without small black books that disappear containing the clue to mysterious fortunes.
▪ Somehow with the right count Glover had a harder time believing any ofit was real.
▪ Her stepdaughter was only twelve, still a child, and a child who had had a hard time.
▪ For Uncle Allen the truly hard times seemed all behind him.
▪ However, you would not get £149.95p each if you fell on hard times and wanted to sell your sovereigns.
▪ Then agents have a hard time distinguishing illegal aliens from others, he said.
▪ The 1930s were hard times, so I think they will be forgiven for this slight oversight.
▪ With this theme, I had a hard time working in math and science.
times
▪ But Johnny Herbert's had his fair share of hard times.
▪ His large manufacturing company was in the throes of hard times.
▪ If nothing else, the bank's comical detachment from real life may prove a comfort in these hard times.
▪ The dean himself was incredible in guiding me through some hard times.
▪ The Cambridge University Automobile Club had clearly fallen on hard times, too.
▪ For Uncle Allen the truly hard times seemed all behind him.
▪ The hard times foreseen by Nicholas senior now came.
▪ Stories about hard times teach the value of perseverance and hard work.
water
▪ Scum is formed when soaps and detergents react with hard water.
▪ It is very sensitive to calcium and does not do well in alkaline or hard water.
▪ It is tolerant of most water conditions, although very hard water may result in the fish's eyes becoming cloudy.
▪ It also grows well in soft as well as medium hard water.
Water condition: Very indifferent to conditions, but medium hard water with slight acidity is preferred.
▪ They withstand artificial illumination well not only from above but also from the sides and are indifferent to moderately hard water.
way
▪ It must be won, and won the hard way.
▪ Indefatigable, playing the hard way, with his own set of rules to back him up.
▪ I learned this the hard way.
▪ I've been in and out of places, I've had to learn the hard way.
▪ What followed was three years of adults learning the hard way about performance and change.
▪ I was brought up the hard way.
▪ I have done it the hard way.
work
▪ This is hard work which Karen and her assistants tackle with enthusiasm and dexterity.
▪ Perhaps his / her more modest achievements are indeed due to hard work and a love of learning.
▪ A short spell of hard work in quiet surroundings would not be a bad thing.
▪ Success comes from hard work, dedication, teamwork, discipline.
▪ How good of you to do all that work - and it is such hard work!
▪ He had worked hard all his life, and hard work always gave him tangible results.
▪ The hard work of preparation was punctuated by various diversions.
▪ Everyone complained about the heat and the flies and the hard work, but Luna complained less than the rest of us.
worker
▪ Since then he has shown every sign of being a pragmatist, an adroit politician and a very hard worker.
▪ He is supposedly not the hardest worker ever.
▪ She was known to be very tough and a very hard worker.
▪ He was a good, hard worker.
▪ He made Mrs Timms look uninterested in her store, the Reliance Market, and she was a hard worker.
▪ The personnel officer read out the relevant paragraph: Muriel is a hard worker and does well when working on her own.
▪ Children who understand the importance of work tend to imitate their parents and become hard workers themselves.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(hard/hot/close) on sb's heels
(hard/hot/close) on the heels of sth
▪ Critique followed hot on the heels of this pioneering work.
▪ On the heels of this came Mr J. to tell us that young Mrs P. had had her thighbone crushed.
▪ Then it seemed that the consummation would follow soon on the heels of its inauguration.
▪ With another couple of laps he might have finished close on the heels of the two Dunlops.
a difficult/hard/good etc one
▪ But what is temperament, and how do we define what is a good one?
▪ I knew there was no sense in trying to do a better one.
▪ Maybe it was a crackpot theory, but it was a good one.
▪ Nevertheless, it was always clear that Schmidt's third term in office would prove a difficult one.
▪ Payno was gleeful, for his idea was a good one.
▪ The belief that hierarchical organizational structure makes for good business is a difficult one to give up.
▪ The Berlin Philharmonic as it exists today may be a happier orchestra, but it is in no way a better one.
▪ Then I became a lead project manager and, I have to say, I was a good one.
a hard/tough etc act to follow
▪ Clearly Amelia was a hard act to follow.
▪ Colm Toibin's piece will be a hard act to follow but I suspect you are up to it.
▪ I know that she will be a tough act to follow.
▪ It was a hard act to follow, but the poor did what they could to provide respectable funerals for their dead.
▪ John's is, of course, a hard act to follow.
▪ The new model has a tough act to follow.
▪ You've certainly set us a hard act to follow!
a hard/tough nut to crack
▪ Daytime television is a tough nut to crack. New shows have to be good enough to beat the old favorites.
▪ Already highly successful in popular music, dance and commercial television, blacks have found the movies a tougher nut to crack.
▪ Beverley was a tougher nut to crack.
▪ West Ham will be a tough nut to crack especially with big Lee in good form at the moment.
a hard/tough row to hoe
▪ Improving schools with little funding is a tough row to hoe.
▪ They have a hard row to hoe.
a hard/tough sell
as hard/tough as nails
▪ Willie O'Connor is as hard as nails and Liam Simpson takes no prisoners.
bad/difficult/hard etc enough
▪ Even a Patel, probably a Bhatt if I looked hard enough.
▪ It's bad enough trying to fly with unequal line lengths; having an asymmetric kite can be most frustrating!
▪ She identified the problem not as trying too hard to live up to a domestic ideal but as not trying hard enough.
▪ Since the cold war ended in 1988, they have worked hard enough to produce some kind of an economic miracle.
▪ That was going to be difficult enough anyway.
▪ The ties with the past difficult enough to sever already.
▪ This would be bad enough if California prisons were full of nothing but Charles Mansons.
bad/hard/tough luck
▪ Can't have that, can we, not on top of all your other hard luck.
▪ He felt that this little piece of bad luck might affect his whole day.
▪ I kept looking into the mirror and hating my bad luck, but there they were.
▪ There were lots of near misses: some great saves from both keepers, and sheer bad luck.
▪ Unfortunately, the gents had bad luck.
▪ You go up there with the wrong attitude and come out with worse luck than you had before.
be (stuck) between a rock and a hard place
be a hard act to follow
▪ Clearly Amelia was a hard act to follow.
▪ Colm Toibin's piece will be a hard act to follow but I suspect you are up to it.
▪ It was a hard act to follow, but the poor did what they could to provide respectable funerals for their dead.
▪ Judith will be a hard act to follow.
be a hard/stern/tough taskmaster
▪ If self-employment is any guide, the dejobbed worker is likely to be a stern taskmaster.
▪ She was a hard taskmaster but a considerably fairer one than la Belle Ethel.
▪ True to his word, he schooled her in horsemanship and was a hard taskmaster.
better/harder/worse etc still
▪ And 245 specialty stock funds that focus on particular industries did better still, averaging a 6. 5 percent gain.
▪ But perhaps the early evening was better still?
▪ He didn't talk because he was afraid of losing the pole or, worse still, falling in.
▪ I started to hunt for a cheap restaurant or, better still, a snack shop.
▪ I thought that it would soon pass, and it did - for you to work harder still.
▪ Or better still, make a real talent show instead.
▪ Or better still, there was the village school practically next door!
▪ With hindsight, it would have better still to lock in a few more gains.
fall on hard/bad times
▪ At 21 she is set for stardom, but she still finds time for people who have fallen on hard times.
▪ Even by political standards, Gingrich very quickly fell on hard times.
▪ I assumed that if a person fell on hard times some one else in the wider family would rescue them.
▪ Interestingly, though, the bottom 10 includes many household names fallen on hard times.
▪ The Cambridge University Automobile Club had clearly fallen on hard times, too.
▪ The model cities program fell on hard times soon after it began.
▪ With the outbreak of war, the shop fell on harder times.
▪ Worse, because of Jack the father has fallen on hard times and must meet all kinds of debts.
good/hard/quick etc worker
▪ He is supposedly not the hardest worker ever.
▪ He made Mrs Timms look uninterested in her store, the Reliance Market, and she was a hard worker.
▪ He was a good, hard worker.
▪ She was known to be very tough and a very hard worker.
▪ She was such a hard worker and a wonderful cook.
▪ The girl was a good worker who came and went quietly about her business.
it's difficult/hard to believe (that)
▪ Female speaker It's hard to believe it's happened.
▪ It's hard to believe another child could do such a thing.
▪ It's hard to believe just how dire it is.
▪ It's hard to believe Marie's got a husband.
▪ It's hard to believe now but I actually made do with hooks for a while!
▪ It's hard to believe that he started painting in World War Two and is still painting today.
▪ It's hard to believe, but we're fast approaching the dessert hour.
▪ The ideological points are still there but it's hard to believe that totalitarian regimentation could be so tight.
learn (sth) the hard way
▪ I learned the hard way that drugs weren't an answer to my problems.
▪ But, as Server shows us, he learned apathy the hard way.
▪ Early on he learned - the hard way - that it was the passport to success.
▪ He learned this the hard way, when he tried to move his head.
▪ I learned that the hard way, by losing a couple of first drafts of articles I was writing.
▪ I learned this the hard way.
▪ Mainline medicine learned this the hard way when it first started to use anesthetics.
▪ She had learned it the hard way and she never let her guard slip at all.
▪ The Lisa designers also learned this the hard way, and their computer shipped with 1024K, or a megabyte of memory.
make heavy/hard work of sth
▪ She was making hard work of plucking the goose.
▪ You can make hard work of an easy job if you don't know the right way to go.
old habits die hard
▪ But old habits die hard, and Apple has shown a proclivity to chase market share while hand-wringing over shrinking gross margins.
▪ It was probably unnecessary, she thought, but old habits died hard.
▪ Things were going well, but old habits die hard.
old habits/traditions/customs die hard
▪ But old habits die hard, and Apple has shown a proclivity to chase market share while hand-wringing over shrinking gross margins.
▪ It was probably unnecessary, she thought, but old habits died hard.
▪ Perhaps because it's an island old customs die hard here.
▪ Things were going well, but old habits die hard.
▪ This is an area where old customs die hard.
pack a (hard/hefty/strong etc) punch
▪ A wave 10 feet high and 500 feet long can pack a punch of 400,000 pounds per linear foot of its crest.
▪ Anne Packer packed a punch with Baked Beans.
▪ At last - takeaway sandwiches with flavour that packs a punch!
▪ For the first time in a long time, an Eddie Murphy movie packs a punch.
▪ The paper is light; it doesn't pack a punch.
play hard to get
▪ You should call her again - I think she's just playing hard to get.
▪ And they may not just be playing hard to get.
▪ I am not going to suggest that you play hard to get.
▪ If it was Viola, she was obviously playing hard to get.
▪ It had nothing to do with teasing or playing hard to get.
tough/hard nut
▪ Already highly successful in popular music, dance and commercial television, blacks have found the movies a tougher nut to crack.
▪ Back, now, to the hard nuts.
▪ Beverley was a tougher nut to crack.
▪ One glance was all it took to realise this was one hard nut to crack - his features still completely impassive.
▪ Shearer, a tough nut not inclined to whinge, said his ankle was like a pudding.
▪ Tax will be an even tougher nut.
▪ West Ham will be a tough nut to crack especially with big Lee in good form at the moment.
work sb hard
▪ Sometimes I think that they work us too hard in this office.
▪ The bank's managers admit that they work their employees hard, but on the other hand they pay good wages.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a hard mattress
▪ a piece of hard candy
▪ A tiled floor in the kitchen is as hard as stone, and very cold beneath your feet.
▪ As people age, their skin becomes harder and less supple.
▪ Chemistry was one of the hardest classes I've ever taken.
▪ Diamond is probably the hardest substance known to man.
▪ Give the door a hard push.
▪ He's a hard man to work for, but he's fair.
▪ I've cooked the potatoes for half an hour but they still seem a bit hard.
▪ I find it hard to believe that he didn't know the gun was loaded.
▪ I thought the exam was really hard.
▪ I wish this chair wasn't so hard and uncomfortable.
▪ It's hard to see the stage from here.
▪ It's not my fault, John. Don't give me a hard time.
▪ It was hard for me to understand her - her accent was very strong.
▪ It was a long hard walk back to the nearest town.
▪ Keep the cake in a tin, to prevent it from going hard.
▪ Let your mother sit down. She's had a hard day at work.
▪ Mowing the lawn is hard work.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A hard disk is usually built into the computer and is a slightly different form of storage.
▪ But the Clinton administration is still taking a hard line.
▪ Instead it meant hard work with a capital H for all the fifteen or so staff.
▪ Some hard cheeses are permitted to age.
▪ The slickest feature of all is the fully poweroperated hard top.
▪ Toilet roll, used, in small smelly brown-streaked sheets - both the hard kind and the soft kind.
▪ Yes, exhibitions are hard work!
II.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
bite
▪ Lily put her fist in her mouth and bit hard on her fingers.
▪ She twisted her mouth in a cry of sheer ecstasy and bit hard on her lip.
▪ Her teeth bit hard into her lower lip.
▪ The boy smiled faintly, and then bit hard on his lips and gnawed the smile away.
brake
▪ Doyle swerved, running the car on to the right hand verge, and braked hard.
▪ Clayt braked hard, pulled off and cut the engine.
▪ But he might still have been able to stop in time if he'd braked hard enough.
▪ Desperate not to have to overtake, he'd braked hard and had felt the car shimmy dangerously.
▪ He braked hard to a halt outside the Co-op in Newtown, just as Billy and Mary turned the comer.
▪ Streuer had to brake hard, and on purpose he just nudged my backside with the front of his bike.
▪ He braked hard and managed to stop before impact, but the woman fell on to the road in front of his car.
▪ He almost missed the turning off the taxiway to the runway and had to brake hard at the last minute.
breathe
▪ Lachy sat down on the pillow at the head of the bed, breathing hard.
▪ Lincoln jumped up and down, breathing hard.
▪ The horror receded as she came back to reality, breathing hard, glad of her cream duvet and calm hotel surroundings.
▪ He looked, breathing hard still, at Oliver.
▪ He was breathing hard, and Joe thought he was even sweating.
▪ Ezra stepped then stopped, breathing hard.
▪ He stared at her for a second in stunned silence, breathing hard, his eyes dazed.
fight
▪ Belfast was one which fought hard and played great football.
▪ For years we fought hard against the police attitude not to treat this as a crime.
▪ I hoped to keep one of them alive for questioning, but they fought hard.
▪ The president fought hard for the plan, and saw it through Congress by mid-March.
▪ Cnut's men had fought hard, and doubtless expected to be remunerated accordingly.
▪ I fought hard for the right to be right.
▪ She fought hard to get him a part-time playgroup place in the group his older brother attended.
▪ She was fighting hard not to be unpleasant.
hit
▪ But the high interest rate policy and squeeze on retailers hit hard.
▪ I hit hard at the inadequacies in housing in the city.
▪ Firms and institutions which are otherwise financially sound could be hard hit by a protracted run of debt defaults.
▪ Hideo Nomo, who was hit hard in his last start, is scheduled to start again Monday against the Florida Marlins.
▪ Ray Gasson's herd of 250 could have been hard hit.
▪ Among the other vegetables hit hard were cucumbers, tomatoes, bell peppers and sweet corn.
▪ If a ban is approved, the famous Beaufort hunt will be hard hit.
▪ But then the booze started hitting hard, and I got really scared.
listen
▪ We are listening hard to its recommendations and we take seriously the points that it makes to us.
▪ Maybe an illness, he thought, listening hard.
▪ Now, when Tallis listened hard, she could hear a drum being beaten as a warning.
▪ He listened hard, shook his head.
▪ On the way, Endill listened hard in case the Headmaster was wandering about.
▪ No, the White House has been listening hard to how people think things look, and devising plans to fit.
▪ He pressed his ear against the receiver and listened hard.
look
▪ Though still handsome, he looked hard, ruthless, and twice as dangerous as Isabel remembered.
▪ I looked hard at the target and raised the gun, stared at the target, closed my eyes, and fired.
▪ Consequently she looked hard for work away from Marlott.
▪ Connors looked hard at the gun, but said nothing.
▪ Even a Patel, probably a Bhatt if I looked hard enough.
▪ We have again looked hard at our working practices and cost base and have made substantial changes.
▪ He looked hard at the outline of the body under the rug.
play
▪ Work hard but play hard, too-you deserve to celebrate.
▪ All he wants to do is play hard.
▪ Apparently all 22 players could read, and they all realized that they needn't bother to play hard any more.
▪ Most of all, they have to continue working and playing hard.
▪ The Cougars played hard, but not always smart.
▪ We just have to go out and play hard every night.
▪ This is what she likes to see: good, hard playing, everyone working the floor, tough defense.
▪ Westphal had two rules: be on time and play hard, and the first rule was flexible.
press
▪ The new strike partnership of Saunders and substitute Dwight Yorke failed to make an immediate impression as Ipswich pressed hard.
▪ You will be hard pressed to choose a single main course because so many are mouth-watering.
▪ These expectations were nurtured by the adversarial nature of electoral competition and they pressed hard on to government.
▪ They point to long-term costs that even a thriving enterprise would be hard pressed to minimize or absorb.
▪ The statue was unreasonably heavy, pressing hard against him.
▪ The Dwarfs were hard pressed at first, but eventually saw the Orcs off with the help of their formidable cannons.
▪ He was pressing hard on the button and standing patiently for the door to open.
▪ One is hard pressed even to find them in London.
push
▪ They responded by pushing hard into corporate finance, seeking to use shareholdings as a door-opener.
▪ However, Thompson questioned whether the administration will push hard if resistance stiffens.
▪ Brian was pushed hard against the side of a car parked in the far corner of the bar's car park.
▪ I fell back, like a person pushed hard.
▪ Missing are neighborhood and business associations: two groups that pushed hard during the former administration for a crackdown on nuisance crimes.
▪ Big agricultural businesses, primarily in California, pushed hard for the temporary workers.
▪ Each pushed hard against the other.
put
▪ Commentators were hard put to find words to describe the ceremonial splendor of the final event.
▪ Nevertheless, an ordinary person might be hard put to tell one from the other.
▪ Governments will then be hard put to get it on to their national statute books by mid-1993.
▪ Without this map we'd be hard put to find our way.
▪ Yet had she been asked what that destination was she would have been hard put to it to answer.
▪ Now we were hard put to find a grubby corner of the upper dock in which to berth Venturous.
▪ Many modern offerings are hard put to please the eye quite so much.
stare
▪ They were both staring hard at me.
▪ I felt something akin to the tender hatred one can sense when staring hard at a photograph of oneself.
▪ He stared hard at pictures held out to him, trying to decipher their language.
▪ Red is staring hard at Jody.
▪ She stared hard at the black curly hairs on the neck of the man she'd married nine years before.
▪ As he put on his coat, he stared hard at Nancy, frowning a little.
swallow
▪ Closing her eyes, she swallowed hard, shuddering violently.
▪ I flushed, swallowed hard, struggled to keep from crying, struggled not to be overwhelmed by my fear of falling.
▪ He swallowed hard once or twice.
▪ Occasionally he would grimace and swallow hard, his lips going tight.
▪ She swallowed hard, then stretched out her hand and took it.
▪ Cantor momentarily closed his eyes and swallowed hard.
▪ Unbearably affected, she swallowed hard.
▪ She swallowed hard and pulled faces.
think
▪ I was thinking hard about why Prince pleasured me.
▪ Too worried to eat, I sat there thinking hard about my situation.
▪ Of course I didn't go and see Father Courtney without thinking hard about our relationship.
▪ I sat still, sipping slowly and thinking hard.
▪ I could see they had thought hard about this.
▪ Now the Walker Cup match is over, certain players should think hard before chasing a mirage.
▪ I know it's harrowing for you, but think hard.
▪ She stared at the letter again, thinking hard, despairing.
try
▪ Starting in 1967, we tried hard to whip up interest in the robots among potential customers, but with little success.
▪ At halftime, Oregon is up by twelve points, and Jody is trying hard not to let her emotions show.
▪ The Bishop tried hard to express his grateful thanks.
▪ She tried hard to look composed, but it was more difficult than she could have imagined.
▪ He tried hard not to admire or approve of the heroine, tried to imagine that life was not like that really.
▪ Mr Forsyth said that the tenants' association had tried hard to improve the quality of life for all concerned.
▪ They took great care and were concentrating on a small area, trying hard not to tread on the bones.
▪ Churt tried hard to come back and Paul Jones in the Haslemere goal had to make one particularly fine diving save.
win
▪ Chocolate is a multimillion pound industry, and each hard won market segment is jealously guarded by the giant global manufacturers.
▪ It was a time when the nation sought unity and the democracy so hard won in the Revolution.
▪ These achievements were hard won and preserving them will be a struggle.
work
▪ He remains convinced that it is imperative to work hard on his swing.
▪ The men worked hard in the stockyards, nearby factories, breweries, and construction sites.
Work hard, stay poor; that is the message of money.
▪ He encountered two State Department officials working hard in Athens.
▪ Both Maid Marian and Holy War are very clean engines and little smoke can be seen even when working hard.
▪ Instead, they must work hard throughout the period of change until they have integrated new behaviors into daily routines.
▪ The visual memory is being worked hard here; the child has to carry strings of words, related by meaning.
▪ I worked hard for my education.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(hard/hot/close) on sb's heels
(hard/hot/close) on the heels of sth
▪ Critique followed hot on the heels of this pioneering work.
▪ On the heels of this came Mr J. to tell us that young Mrs P. had had her thighbone crushed.
▪ Then it seemed that the consummation would follow soon on the heels of its inauguration.
▪ With another couple of laps he might have finished close on the heels of the two Dunlops.
a darn sight better/harder etc
a difficult/hard/good etc one
▪ But what is temperament, and how do we define what is a good one?
▪ I knew there was no sense in trying to do a better one.
▪ Maybe it was a crackpot theory, but it was a good one.
▪ Nevertheless, it was always clear that Schmidt's third term in office would prove a difficult one.
▪ Payno was gleeful, for his idea was a good one.
▪ The belief that hierarchical organizational structure makes for good business is a difficult one to give up.
▪ The Berlin Philharmonic as it exists today may be a happier orchestra, but it is in no way a better one.
▪ Then I became a lead project manager and, I have to say, I was a good one.
a hard/tough etc act to follow
▪ Clearly Amelia was a hard act to follow.
▪ Colm Toibin's piece will be a hard act to follow but I suspect you are up to it.
▪ I know that she will be a tough act to follow.
▪ It was a hard act to follow, but the poor did what they could to provide respectable funerals for their dead.
▪ John's is, of course, a hard act to follow.
▪ The new model has a tough act to follow.
▪ You've certainly set us a hard act to follow!
a hard/tough nut to crack
▪ Daytime television is a tough nut to crack. New shows have to be good enough to beat the old favorites.
▪ Already highly successful in popular music, dance and commercial television, blacks have found the movies a tougher nut to crack.
▪ Beverley was a tougher nut to crack.
▪ West Ham will be a tough nut to crack especially with big Lee in good form at the moment.
a hard/tough row to hoe
▪ Improving schools with little funding is a tough row to hoe.
▪ They have a hard row to hoe.
a hard/tough sell
as hard/tough as nails
▪ Willie O'Connor is as hard as nails and Liam Simpson takes no prisoners.
bad/difficult/hard etc enough
▪ Even a Patel, probably a Bhatt if I looked hard enough.
▪ It's bad enough trying to fly with unequal line lengths; having an asymmetric kite can be most frustrating!
▪ She identified the problem not as trying too hard to live up to a domestic ideal but as not trying hard enough.
▪ Since the cold war ended in 1988, they have worked hard enough to produce some kind of an economic miracle.
▪ That was going to be difficult enough anyway.
▪ The ties with the past difficult enough to sever already.
▪ This would be bad enough if California prisons were full of nothing but Charles Mansons.
bad/hard/tough luck
▪ Can't have that, can we, not on top of all your other hard luck.
▪ He felt that this little piece of bad luck might affect his whole day.
▪ I kept looking into the mirror and hating my bad luck, but there they were.
▪ There were lots of near misses: some great saves from both keepers, and sheer bad luck.
▪ Unfortunately, the gents had bad luck.
▪ You go up there with the wrong attitude and come out with worse luck than you had before.
be (hard) pushed to do sth
be (stuck) between a rock and a hard place
be a hard act to follow
▪ Clearly Amelia was a hard act to follow.
▪ Colm Toibin's piece will be a hard act to follow but I suspect you are up to it.
▪ It was a hard act to follow, but the poor did what they could to provide respectable funerals for their dead.
▪ Judith will be a hard act to follow.
be a hard/stern/tough taskmaster
▪ If self-employment is any guide, the dejobbed worker is likely to be a stern taskmaster.
▪ She was a hard taskmaster but a considerably fairer one than la Belle Ethel.
▪ True to his word, he schooled her in horsemanship and was a hard taskmaster.
better/harder/worse etc still
▪ And 245 specialty stock funds that focus on particular industries did better still, averaging a 6. 5 percent gain.
▪ But perhaps the early evening was better still?
▪ He didn't talk because he was afraid of losing the pole or, worse still, falling in.
▪ I started to hunt for a cheap restaurant or, better still, a snack shop.
▪ I thought that it would soon pass, and it did - for you to work harder still.
▪ Or better still, make a real talent show instead.
▪ Or better still, there was the village school practically next door!
▪ With hindsight, it would have better still to lock in a few more gains.
cold (hard) cash
▪ After a year, the igloo-shaped stadium has cost the citizens $ 20 million in very cold cash.
▪ Luckily, the chatter of cold hard cash later persuaded the state to sell the name to the highest bidder.
▪ No cold cash in the Nugent icebox, however, so I moved on.
▪ The other driving force is cold cash and order books.
fall on hard/bad times
▪ At 21 she is set for stardom, but she still finds time for people who have fallen on hard times.
▪ Even by political standards, Gingrich very quickly fell on hard times.
▪ I assumed that if a person fell on hard times some one else in the wider family would rescue them.
▪ Interestingly, though, the bottom 10 includes many household names fallen on hard times.
▪ The Cambridge University Automobile Club had clearly fallen on hard times, too.
▪ The model cities program fell on hard times soon after it began.
▪ With the outbreak of war, the shop fell on harder times.
▪ Worse, because of Jack the father has fallen on hard times and must meet all kinds of debts.
good/hard/quick etc worker
▪ He is supposedly not the hardest worker ever.
▪ He made Mrs Timms look uninterested in her store, the Reliance Market, and she was a hard worker.
▪ He was a good, hard worker.
▪ She was known to be very tough and a very hard worker.
▪ She was such a hard worker and a wonderful cook.
▪ The girl was a good worker who came and went quietly about her business.
it's difficult/hard to believe (that)
▪ Female speaker It's hard to believe it's happened.
▪ It's hard to believe another child could do such a thing.
▪ It's hard to believe just how dire it is.
▪ It's hard to believe Marie's got a husband.
▪ It's hard to believe now but I actually made do with hooks for a while!
▪ It's hard to believe that he started painting in World War Two and is still painting today.
▪ It's hard to believe, but we're fast approaching the dessert hour.
▪ The ideological points are still there but it's hard to believe that totalitarian regimentation could be so tight.
learn (sth) the hard way
▪ I learned the hard way that drugs weren't an answer to my problems.
▪ But, as Server shows us, he learned apathy the hard way.
▪ Early on he learned - the hard way - that it was the passport to success.
▪ He learned this the hard way, when he tried to move his head.
▪ I learned that the hard way, by losing a couple of first drafts of articles I was writing.
▪ I learned this the hard way.
▪ Mainline medicine learned this the hard way when it first started to use anesthetics.
▪ She had learned it the hard way and she never let her guard slip at all.
▪ The Lisa designers also learned this the hard way, and their computer shipped with 1024K, or a megabyte of memory.
make heavy/hard work of sth
▪ She was making hard work of plucking the goose.
▪ You can make hard work of an easy job if you don't know the right way to go.
old habits die hard
▪ But old habits die hard, and Apple has shown a proclivity to chase market share while hand-wringing over shrinking gross margins.
▪ It was probably unnecessary, she thought, but old habits died hard.
▪ Things were going well, but old habits die hard.
old habits/traditions/customs die hard
▪ But old habits die hard, and Apple has shown a proclivity to chase market share while hand-wringing over shrinking gross margins.
▪ It was probably unnecessary, she thought, but old habits died hard.
▪ Perhaps because it's an island old customs die hard here.
▪ Things were going well, but old habits die hard.
▪ This is an area where old customs die hard.
pack a (hard/hefty/strong etc) punch
▪ A wave 10 feet high and 500 feet long can pack a punch of 400,000 pounds per linear foot of its crest.
▪ Anne Packer packed a punch with Baked Beans.
▪ At last - takeaway sandwiches with flavour that packs a punch!
▪ For the first time in a long time, an Eddie Murphy movie packs a punch.
▪ The paper is light; it doesn't pack a punch.
play hard to get
▪ You should call her again - I think she's just playing hard to get.
▪ And they may not just be playing hard to get.
▪ I am not going to suggest that you play hard to get.
▪ If it was Viola, she was obviously playing hard to get.
▪ It had nothing to do with teasing or playing hard to get.
the hard of hearing
tough/hard nut
▪ Already highly successful in popular music, dance and commercial television, blacks have found the movies a tougher nut to crack.
▪ Back, now, to the hard nuts.
▪ Beverley was a tougher nut to crack.
▪ One glance was all it took to realise this was one hard nut to crack - his features still completely impassive.
▪ Shearer, a tough nut not inclined to whinge, said his ankle was like a pudding.
▪ Tax will be an even tougher nut.
▪ West Ham will be a tough nut to crack especially with big Lee in good form at the moment.
work sb hard
▪ Sometimes I think that they work us too hard in this office.
▪ The bank's managers admit that they work their employees hard, but on the other hand they pay good wages.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Elaine had been working hard all morning.
▪ It's raining hard.
▪ She ran all that way and she wasn't even breathing hard.
▪ Tyson hit him hard on the chin.
▪ We try hard to keep our customers happy.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ This seems hard on the hippopotamus.
▪ Unlike Shaw, he had to work, and he worked hard.
▪ Work hard when and where you were required: that's what was in the articles.
Wikipedia

Hard

Hard or hardness may refer to:

  • Hardness, resistance of physical materials to deformation or fracture
  • Hard (surname)
  • Hard (nautical), a beach or slope convenient for hauling out vessels
  • Hard (tennis), a type of court
  • Hard, Austria, a town
  • Hard (Zürich), a quarter of the city
  • Hayward Area Recreation and Park District

Hard (Gang of Four album)

Hard is the fourth studio album by the English post-punk group Gang of Four. It was originally released in 1983 on Warner Bros. Records and was the first album to not feature original member Hugo Burnham, while Dave Allen had already left before the previous album, Songs of the Free.

The album was later reissued as part of a two- CD package along with the band's 1981 album Solid Gold.

Hard (Zürich)

Hard is a quarter in the district 4 of Zürich. It was formerly a part of Aussersihl municipality, which was incorporated into Zürich in 1893. The quarter has a population of 12,715 distributed on an area of 1.46 km² (as of 2009).

Hard (surname)

Hard is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Darlene Hard, American tennis player
  • James Hard, American Civil War soldier
  • Peggy Hård, Swedish clerk

<!---------------------------------------- This long comment was added to the page to prevent it from being listed on Special:Shortpages.

Hard (nautical)

A hard is a firm or paved beach or slope by water that is convenient for hauling boats out of the water. The term is especially used in Hampshire, southern England.

Hard (Jagged Edge album)

Hard is the fourth studio album by American R&B group Jagged Edge, released on October 14, 2003 (see 2003 in music). The album debuted at number 3 on the Billboard 200 with first-week sales of 178,000 copies in the US. It has been certified Gold by the RIAA and has currently sold 871,000 copies in the US.

The album also spawned two singles, the top ten single " Walked Outta Heaven" and the song "What's It Like."

The album track "Visions," includes background vocals from former Anjel member, Tiffany Beaudoin. In addition, the song has an interpolation from the song, " You Are My Starship", a 1976 song released by Norman Connors.

Hard (band)

Hard is a Hungarian hard rock supergroup formed in late 2004 in Budapest, Hungary by József Kalapács (ex-vocalist of Pokolgép and Omen, currently also singing in Kalapács) and Gábor Mirkovics (ex-bass guitarist of EDDA Művek). The rest of the band consisted of guitarist Zsolt Csillik (ex-Dance, Jack Daniels and Fix), keyboardist Dénes Makovics (also known for playing saxophone in Bikini) and drummer Zoltán Váry (ex-Sing Sing, ex-Zero-G, guitars–vocals for the Hungarian KISS tribute band KISS Forever Band).

In 2005, Ferenc Béres arrived to fill in the position of Dénes Makovics, who was a session member for the studio recording of the first release, “Égni kell”. He played in EDDA Művek and Fix beforehand. In 2007, Váry left because of the German success of KISS Forever Band (he couldn't concentrate on Hard enough), so Donászy arrived, who also played in e.g. Beatrice.

In 2007 Hard reformed for an international introduction with singer Zoltan Batky (BZ). The album Traveler was released in 2008. The material has since been remixed by the producer Beau Hill in 2008.

In 2009, Swedish vocalist and guitarist Björn Lodin was confirmed as the new singer for Hard. Björn is known for his work with Swedish rockers Baltimoore. Platinum-selling Hungarian guitar virtuoso Endre Csillag has also joined the ranks along with drummer Balázs Hornyák. The band start recording their new CD together in the Autumn with Björn Lodin also handling the production duties. The new, as yet untitled album, is scheduled for release on BLP Music, March 2010.

"Love Goes With Anything" is the debut single from the new line-up and was released in November 2009.

Hard (Brainpower album)

Hard (Hard) is the fifth album by Dutch language rapper Brainpower. It was released April 21, 2008 on Lyric Recordings, together with his fourth album Hart (Heart) and contains the single "Boks Ouwe". Hard and Hart are two albums sold together, where Hard represents the raw hip hop side of Brainpower, which is expressed in both beats and lyrics.

Hip Hop veteran Brainpower separates his more melodious material from his famous 'braggin' & boast' side.

'Hard' represents the harder side of Hip Hop. From traditional MC-ing and battle raps on raw beats to club bangers in all sorts and forms. The notion/word 'Hard' ('Hard') is being approached from different angles. Guest appearances include Dicecream, T-Slash, The Partysquad and rap-sensation Sjaak.

Hard (Rihanna song)

"Hard" is a song by Barbadian recording artist Rihanna from her fourth studio album, Rated R (2009). The song was written by Terius Nash, Christopher Stewart, Rihanna, and Jeezy, with vocals performed by the latter two. Nash and Stewart produced it under their stage names, The-Dream and Tricky Stewart. "Hard" was sent to radio by Def Jam Recordings on November 10, 2009, as the second United States single from Rated R. It is a hip hop song and features military horns, hissing synthesizers, sharp beats and piano chords. Upon its release, it received critical acclaim, with critics praising Rihanna's vocal performance and Jeezy's collaboration.

The song became Rihanna's thirteenth top ten hit on the US Billboard Hot 100, matching Beyoncé as the female artist with the most US top ten songs since 2000. It was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America. An accompanying music video, directed by Melina Matsoukas, was filmed in Los Angeles in December 2009. In the video, Rihanna commands an army while clothed in stylized military costumes. Critics praised the video and noted a difference from her previous clips. After the video premiere, the song charted in Canada, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. Rihanna performed "Hard" at Jay-Z's concert at UCLA Pauley Pavilion and at the 2009 American Music Awards. The song was also included on the set lists of the Last Girl on Earth Tour (2010–11) and the Loud Tour (2011).

Hard (TV series)

Hard is a French television series created and produced by Cathy Verney, airing since 9 May 2008 on Canal+ in France, and later internationally. The series focuses on the pornographic movie industry. It is part of the "New Trilogy" collection on Canal+.

Hard (music festival)

Hard is a national music festival, music cruise and concert brand founded by Gary Richards in 2007. The event line-ups consist of alternative and electronic acts and emerging talents. The first Hard Music Festival was held on December 31, 2007 in Downtown Los Angeles and featured Justice, Peaches and 2 Live Crew. Hard is best known for the Hard Summer Music Festival and Hard Haunted Mansion, though also runs several smaller events and once-off shows. Hard is sometimes called "Hardfest" by fans, based on the event's website (hardfest.com) and social media shortcuts. Additional Hard brands include the Hard Summer Tour, Hard 13, Turkey Soup, and the Holy Ship! electronic music cruise. Live Nation Entertainment acquired Hard in 2012.

Hard (EP)

Hard is a 1993 extended play single by Scottish alternative rock group Goodbye Mr. Mackenzie. Both "Hard" and "Normal Boy" were taken from the band's third studio album Five which the release of Hard preceded.

Hard is notable as the last single release by Goodbye Mr. Mackenzie that Shirley Manson participated in; she had left the group's side-project Angelfish to join American alternative group Garbage by the time that follow up E.P. The Way I Walk was released. "Normal Boy" is also notable the first of three Mackenzie tracks that Manson shared lead vocal with singer Martin Metcalfe; the second, "Bug Dive", was released on Five, while the third, "Carnival Is Over", remains unreleased.

Hard (video gamer)

Anthony Barkhovtsev, better known as Hard, is a Canadian League of Legends player and Jungler for Echo Fox, a team currently participating in the North American League of Legends Championship Series (NA LCS). He was announced as part of Echo Fox's starting roster on 5 January 2016. Along with two other foreign players on his team, Froggen and kfo, he missed the first game of the 2016 Spring NA LCS because his team was unable to obtain proper documentation in time.

Hard had previously played for Cloud9 Tempest in the North American League of Legends Challenger Series (NA CS). Cloud9 owner Jack Entienne alleged that LA Renegades owner Chris Badawi attempted to poach Hard while he was still under contract with C9, a claim denied by Renegades management.

Echo Fox finished 10th place, last, in the 2016 Summer NA LCS. Echo Fox survived their relegation match, partially thanks to a timely early game gank from Hard in game one.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Hard

Hard \Hard\ (h[aum]rd), a. [Compar. Harder (-[~e]r); superl. Hardest.] [OE. hard, heard, AS. heard; akin to OS. & D. hard, G. hart, OHG. herti, harti, Icel. har[eth]r, Dan. haard, Sw. h[*a]rd, Goth. hardus, Gr. kraty`s strong, ka`rtos, kra`tos, strength, and also to E. -ard, as in coward, drunkard, -crat, -cracy in autocrat, democracy; cf. Skr. kratu strength, k[.r] to do, make. Cf. Hardy.]

  1. Not easily penetrated, cut, or separated into parts; not yielding to pressure; firm; solid; compact; -- applied to material bodies, and opposed to soft; as, hard wood; hard flesh; a hard apple.

  2. Difficult, mentally or judicially; not easily apprehended, decided, or resolved; as a hard problem.

    The hard causes they brought unto Moses.
    --Ex. xviii. 26.

    In which are some things hard to be understood.
    --2 Peter iii. 16.

  3. Difficult to accomplish; full of obstacles; laborious; fatiguing; arduous; as, a hard task; a disease hard to cure.

  4. Difficult to resist or control; powerful.

    The stag was too hard for the horse.
    --L'Estrange.

    A power which will be always too hard for them.
    --Addison.

  5. Difficult to bear or endure; not easy to put up with or consent to; hence, severe; rigorous; oppressive; distressing; unjust; grasping; as, a hard lot; hard times; hard fare; a hard winter; hard conditions or terms.

    I never could drive a hard bargain.
    --Burke.

  6. Difficult to please or influence; stern; unyielding; obdurate; unsympathetic; unfeeling; cruel; as, a hard master; a hard heart; hard words; a hard character.

  7. Not easy or agreeable to the taste; harsh; stiff; rigid; ungraceful; repelling; as, a hard style.

    Figures harder than even the marble itself.
    --Dryden.

  8. Rough; acid; sour, as liquors; as, hard cider.

  9. (Pron.) Abrupt or explosive in utterance; not aspirated, sibilated, or pronounced with a gradual change of the organs from one position to another; -- said of certain consonants, as c in came, and g in go, as distinguished from the same letters in center, general, etc.

  10. Wanting softness or smoothness of utterance; harsh; as, a hard tone.

  11. (Painting)

    1. Rigid in the drawing or distribution of the figures; formal; lacking grace of composition.

    2. Having disagreeable and abrupt contrasts in the coloring or light and shade.

      Hard cancer, Hard case, etc. See under Cancer, Case, etc.

      Hard clam, or Hard-shelled clam (Zo["o]l.), the quahog.

      Hard coal, anthracite, as distinguished from bituminous coal ( soft coal).

      Hard and fast. (Naut.) See under Fast.

      Hard finish (Arch.), a smooth finishing coat of hard fine plaster applied to the surface of rough plastering.

      Hard lines, hardship; difficult conditions.

      Hard money, coin or specie, as distinguished from paper money.

      Hard oyster (Zo["o]l.), the northern native oyster. [Local, U. S.]

      Hard pan, the hard stratum of earth lying beneath the soil; hence, figuratively, the firm, substantial, fundamental part or quality of anything; as, the hard pan of character, of a matter in dispute, etc. See Pan.

      Hard rubber. See under Rubber.

      Hard solder. See under Solder.

      Hard water, water, which contains lime or some mineral substance rendering it unfit for washing. See Hardness, 3.

      Hard wood, wood of a solid or hard texture; as walnut, oak, ash, box, and the like, in distinction from pine, poplar, hemlock, etc.

      In hard condition, in excellent condition for racing; having firm muscles; -- said of race horses.

      Syn: Solid; arduous; powerful; trying; unyielding; stubborn; stern; flinty; unfeeling; harsh; difficult; severe; obdurate; rigid. See Solid, and Arduous.

Hard

Hard \Hard\, adv. [OE. harde, AS. hearde.]

  1. With pressure; with urgency; hence, diligently; earnestly.

    And prayed so hard for mercy from the prince.
    --Dryden.

    My father Is hard at study; pray now, rest yourself.
    --Shak.

  2. With difficulty; as, the vehicle moves hard.

  3. Uneasily; vexatiously; slowly.
    --Shak.

  4. So as to raise difficulties. ``The question is hard set.''
    --Sir T. Browne.

  5. With tension or strain of the powers; violently; with force; tempestuously; vehemently; vigorously; energetically; as, to press, to blow, to rain hard; hence, rapidly; nimbly; as, to run hard.

  6. Close or near.

    Whose house joined hard to the synagogue.
    --Acts xviii.

  7. Hard by, near by; close at hand; not far off. ``Hard by a cottage chimney smokes.''
    --Milton.

    Hard pushed, Hard run, greatly pressed; as, he was hard pushed or hard run for time, money, etc. [Colloq.]

    Hard up, closely pressed by want or necessity; without money or resources; as, hard up for amusements. [Slang]

    Note: Hard in nautical language is often joined to words of command to the helmsman, denoting that the order should be carried out with the utmost energy, or that the helm should be put, in the direction indicated, to the extreme limit, as, Hard aport! Hard astarboard! Hard alee! Hard aweather! Hard up! Hard is also often used in composition with a participle; as, hard-baked; hard-earned; hard-featured; hard-working; hard-won.

Hard

Hard \Hard\ (h[aum]rd), v. t. To harden; to make hard. [Obs.]
--Chaucer.

Hard

Hard \Hard\, n. A ford or passage across a river or swamp.

WordNet

hard

  1. adj. not easy; requiring great physical or mental effort to accomplish or comprehend or endure; "a difficult task"; "nesting places on the cliffs are difficult of access"; "difficult times"; "a difficult child"; "found himself in a difficult situation"; "why is it so hard for you to keep a secret?" [syn: difficult] [ant: easy]

  2. metaphorically hard; "a hard fate"; "took a hard look"; "a hard bargainer"; "a hard climb" [ant: soft]

  3. not yielding to pressure or easily penetrated; "hard as rock" [ant: soft]

  4. very strong or vigorous; "strong winds"; "a hard left to the chin"; "a knockout punch"; "a severe blow" [syn: knockout, severe]

  5. characterized by toilsome effort to the point of exhaustion; especially physical effort; "worked their arduous way up the mining valley"; "a grueling campaign"; "hard labor"; "heavy work"; "heavy going"; "spent many laborious hours on the project"; "set a punishing pace" [syn: arduous, backbreaking, grueling, gruelling, heavy, laborious, punishing, toilsome]

  6. of speech sounds [ant: soft]

  7. of a drinker or drinking; indulging intemperately; "does a lot of hard drinking"; "a heavy drinker" [syn: hard(a), heavy]

  8. having undergone fermentation; "hard cider" [syn: fermented]

  9. having a high alcoholic content; "hard liquor" [syn: strong]

  10. unfortunate or hard to bear; "had hard luck"; "a tough break" [syn: tough]

  11. dried out; "hard dry rolls left over from the day before"

  12. [also: hardest, harder]

hard

  1. adv. with effort or force or vigor; "the team played hard"; "worked hard all day"; "pressed hard on the lever"; "hit the ball hard"; "slammed the door hard"

  2. with firmness; "held hard to the railing" [syn: firmly]

  3. earnestly or intently; "thought hard about it"; "stared hard at the accused"

  4. causing great damage or hardship; "industries hit hard by the depression"; "she was severely affected by the bank's failure" [syn: severely]

  5. slowly and with difficulty; "prejudices die hard"

  6. indulging excessively; "he drank heavily" [syn: heavily, intemperately] [ant: lightly]

  7. into a solid condition; "concrete that sets hard within a few hours"

  8. very near or close in space or time; "it stands hard by the railroad tracks"; "they were hard on his heels"; "a strike followed hard upon the plant's opening"

  9. with pain or distress or bitterness; "he took the rejection very hard"

  10. to the full extent possible; all the way; "hard alee"; "the ship went hard astern"; "swung the wheel hard left"

  11. [also: hardest, harder]

Wiktionary

hard

a. 1 (label en of material or fluid) Having a severe property; presenting difficulty. 2 # Resistant to pressure. 3 # (label en of drink) strong. 4 # (label en of water) High in dissolved calcium compounds. 5 # (label en physics of a ferromagnetic material) Having the capability of being a permanent magnet by being a material with high magnetic coercivity (compare soft). 6 (label en personal or social) Having a severe property; presenting difficulty. 7 # Requiring a lot of effort to do or understand. adv. 1 (context manner English) With much force or effort. 2 (context manner English) With difficulty. 3 (context obsolete English) So as to raise difficulties. 4 (context manner English) Compactly. 5 (context now archaic English) near, close. n. 1 (context nautical English) A firm or paved beach or slope convenient for hauling vessels out of the water. 2 (context drugs colloquial slang) crack cocaine.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

hard

Old English heard "solid, firm, not soft," also "severe, rigorous, cruel," from Proto-Germanic *hardu- (cognates: Old Saxon and Dutch hard, Old Norse harðr "hard," Old High German harto "extremely, very," German hart, Gothic hardus "hard"), from PIE *kortu- (cognates: Greek kratos "strength," kratys "strong"), from root *kar-/*ker- "hard." Meaning "difficult to do" is from c.1200. The adverb sense was also present in Old English.\n

Hard of hearing preserves obsolete Middle English sense of "having difficulty in doing something." Hard liquor is 1879, American English (hard drink is from 1810; hard cider is from 1789), and this probably led to hard drugs (1955). Hard facts is from 1887; hard news is from 1938. Hard copy (as opposed to computer record) is from 1964; hard disk is from 1978. Hard up (1610s) is originally nautical, of steering (slang sense of "short of money" is from 1821), as is hard and fast (1680s), of a ship on shore. Hard times "period of poverty" is from 1705.\n

\nHard money (1706) is specie, as opposed to paper. Hence 19c. U.S. hard (n.) "one who advocates the use of metallic money as the national currency" (1844). To play hard to get is from 1945. Hard rock as a pop music style recorded from 1967.

Usage examples of "hard".

Will pegged as physically being able to visit those other realms, he had a hard time accepting their existence and his ability to travel to them.

Val died, his gardens were abloom with chrysanthemums, the air golden, the oaks in his yard sculpted against a hard blue sky.

As it was, the spray drenched everyone aboard, causing them to bend their backs that much harder, long before Dunlop screamed at them to do so.

The wind gusted: canvas shook to a wind so hard and sand-edged it abraded his exposed hands.

His chest hair abraded her nipples, his erection pressed hard against her belly.

But the truth would be harder to extract from that stern, scar-twisted mouth, than the abscessed tooth had been.

With a young child and an abusive boyfriend, she had used up all the reserves of hope that she had stored up for emergencies and hard times.

Then Fagin pushed hard for some sort of gas attack, which Banish rejected as well, saying that the Abies family might have gas masks themselves and, if so, the agents and marshals going in would be facing a slaughter.

Banish coming down hard on top of the girl with the baby and the gun and Abies falling forward from the act of Fagin being blown back off his feet and settling still on the ground.

The magnificent prospects which Academician Markov had hinted at in passing were hard to take in all at once.

A hard gamma beam would be suitable, Academician Georgi Markov thought.

As he said the last words my converter rose, and went to the window to dry his tears, I felt deeply moved, anal full of admiration for the virtue of De la Haye and of his pupil, who, to save his soul, had placed himself under the hard necessity of accepting alms.

Then I suffered a vision of Acer Laidlaw piloting Eightball back to Roderick Station with a hold full of atoms that had once been mine, and gritted my teeth so hard I cracked a filling.

The shriveled Vistana had gazed at Clarissewith those hard black eyes, and had pointed with acrooked finger toward the manor house, perched like adark bird on the tor above the village.

There was a legal adage that hard cases made for bad law, but the books could not anticipate all the things that people did.