Find the word definition

The Collaborative International Dictionary

haji

Hadji \Hadj"i\ (-[i^]), n. [Ar. h[=a]jj[imac]. See Hadj.]

  1. A Mohammedan who has made a pilgrimage to Mecca; -- used among Orientals as a respectful salutation or a title of honor.
    --G. W. Curtis.

  2. A Greek or Armenian who has visited the holy sepulcher at Jerusalem.
    --Heyse.

haji

haji \haj"i\, hajji \haj"ji\(h[aum]"j[-e]), n. One who has made a journey to Mecca; Same as hadji.

Wikipedia

Haji (actress)

Haji (born Barbarella Catton; January 24, 1946 – August 9, 2013) was a Canadian-born actress of British and Filipino descent, and a former exotic dancer known for her role in Russ Meyer's 1965 cult classic Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!. She made significant contributions to her roles by introducing elements of psychedelia and witchcraft as well as writing most of her own dialogue.

WordNet

haji

n. a pilgrim who journeys to Mecca [syn: hajji, hadji]

Wiktionary

haji

n. (alternative spelling of hajji English)

Usage examples of "haji".

Podolak is the farthest eastern outpost of a criminal enterprise with its roots in Afghanistan, under the entrepreneurial direction of an Afghani named Haji Haroon.

The works of Abul Khair, previously mentioned, and of Haji Khalfa, embody a mass of information, and constitute the top of the pyramid of encyclopaedical and biographical works, after which nothing worthy of mention has been written on these subjects.

I tried to stop and remind myself, No, come on, Waris, Haji is like your brother.

It may be truly said that this writer, along with Ibn Khallikan, laid the foundations of the records of the edifice of encyclopaedical and biographical works, which was afterwards completed by Haji Khalfa and Abul Khair.

The works of Abul Khair, previously mentioned, and of Haji Khalfa, embody a mass of information, and constitute the top of the pyramid of encyclopaedical and biographical works, after which nothing worthy of mention has been written on these subjects.

Habicht, a translator, 155, 175 Hajaj bin Yusuf bin Matta, the translator, 90, 98 Haji Khalfa, the bibliographer, 55, 113, 115 Hakim II.

His beard was thick and red‑and annoyed his mother, who said only Hajis, men who had made the pilgrimage to Mecca, should grow red beards.

Frigate was quoting lines from Burton's poem, The Kasidah of Haji Abdu AlYazdi.

When he saw the cats and heard their yowl, he turned tail, but RK, Grimla, Pash, Haji, and Sher-Paw bounded after him, only to be outsprinted by the larger, longer-legged Temple cats who guarded Aridimi.