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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Grew

Grow \Grow\ (gr[=o]), v. i. [imp. Grew (gr[udd]); p. p. Grown (gr[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Growing.] [AS. gr[=o]wan; akin to D. groeijen, Icel. gr[=o]a, Dan. groe, Sw. gro. Cf. Green, Grass.]

  1. To increase in size by a natural and organic process; to increase in bulk by the gradual assimilation of new matter into the living organism; -- said of animals and vegetables and their organs.

  2. To increase in any way; to become larger and stronger; to be augmented; to advance; to extend; to wax; to accrue.

    Winter began to grow fast on.
    --Knolles.

    Even just the sum that I do owe to you Is growing to me by Antipholus.
    --Shak.

  3. To spring up and come to maturity in a natural way; to be produced by vegetation; to thrive; to flourish; as, rice grows in warm countries.

    Where law faileth, error groweth.
    --Gower.

  4. To pass from one state to another; to result as an effect from a cause; to become; as, to grow pale.

    For his mind Had grown Suspicion's sanctuary.
    --Byron.

  5. To become attached or fixed; to adhere.

    Our knees shall kneel till to the ground they grow.
    --Shak.

    Growing cell, or Growing slide, a device for preserving alive a minute object in water continually renewed, in a manner to permit its growth to be watched under the microscope.

    Grown over, covered with a growth.

    To grow out of, to issue from, as plants from the soil, or as a branch from the main stem; to result from.

    These wars have grown out of commercial considerations.
    --A. Hamilton.

    To grow up, to arrive at full stature or maturity; as, grown up children.

    To grow together, to close and adhere; to become united by growth, as flesh or the bark of a tree severed.
    --Howells.

    Syn: To become; increase; enlarge; augment; improve; expand; extend.

Grew

Grew \Grew\ (gr[udd]), imp. of Grow.

WordNet

grew

See grow

grow

  1. v. pass into a condition gradually, take on a specific property or attribute; become; "The weather turned nasty"; "She grew angry" [syn: turn]

  2. become larger, greater, or bigger; expand or gain; "The problem grew too large for me"; "Her business grew fast"

  3. increase in size by natural process; "Corn doesn't grow here"; "In these forests, mushrooms grow under the trees"

  4. cause to grow or develop; "He grows vegetables in his backyard"

  5. develop and reach maturity; undergo maturation; "He matured fast"; "The child grew fast" [syn: mature, maturate]

  6. come into existence; take on form or shape; "A new religious movement originated in that country"; "a love that sprang up from friendship"; "the idea for the book grew out of a short story"; "An interesting phenomenon uprose" [syn: originate, arise, rise, develop, uprise, spring up]

  7. cultivate by growing, often involving improvements by means of agricultural techniques; "The Bordeaux region produces great red wines"; "They produce good ham in Parma"; "We grow wheat here"; "We raise hogs here" [syn: raise, farm, produce]

  8. come to have or undergo a change of (physical features and attributes); "He grew a beard"; "The patient developed abdominal pains"; "I got funny spots all over my body"; "Well-developed breasts" [syn: develop, produce, get, acquire]

  9. grow emotionally or mature; "The child developed beautifully in her new kindergarten"; "When he spent a summer at camp, the boy grew noticeably and no longer showed some of his old adolescent behavior" [syn: develop]

  10. become attached by or as if by the process of growth; "The tree trunks had grown together"

  11. [also: grown, grew]

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

grew

COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a legend grew (up) (=developed over time)
▪ The legend of his bravery grew after he killed the dragon.
grew in stature (=became more admired or popular)
▪ He grew in stature during the campaign.
suspicion grew
▪ Suspicion grew that the business was about to collapse.
Wikipedia

Grew

Grew is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Dessie Grew (died 1990), IRA volunteer
  • Henry Grew (1781–1862), Christian teacher
  • Joseph Grew (1880–1965), US diplomat
  • Mark Grew (born 1958), English footballer
  • Nehemiah Grew (1641–1712), English botanist
Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

grew

past tense of grow, from Old English greow, past tense of growan.

Wiktionary

grew

vb. (en-simple past of: grow)

Usage examples of "grew".

The wine made the handkerchief pink as a rose, and her head, where I chafed it, grew crimson.

My hair, as I have said, was very fair then—though it grew plain brown, as I got older—and Mrs Sucksby used to wash it with vinegar and comb it till it sparked.

Mr Ibbs watched him hardest of all: his eye grew narrow, and he tilted his head—he might have been lining him up along the barrel of a gun.

Mrs Sucksby hummed along until her eyes grew damp, and then the hum got broken.

The stations grew smaller and darker, until finally there was nothing at them but a tree—there was nothing to see anywhere, but trees, and beyond them bushes, and beyond them fog— grey fog, not brown—with the black night sky above it.

So thick it grew, I felt it, damp, upon my face, upon my lashes and lips.

I saw her do it, and grew quite cold: for she looked all at once like nothing so much as the matron of a gaol.

There was a place they called a herb-garden, that grew mostly nettles.

Her scissors she used, not for gathering flowers, but only for keeping down the grass that grew about it.

We sat together before the spluttering fire, and talked in a weak kind of way—I forget what of—and then it grew dark, and a maid brought lights.

I smoothed her hair back from her cheek, and held her until she grew calm.

When her fingernails grew long I cut them, with a pair of silver scissors she had, that were shaped like a flying bird.

Her nails were soft and perfectly clean, and grew quickly, like a child's nails.

We all grew nervy as narks—Maud would sit fidgeting for hours at a trot, and when the house clock sounded she would give a little start, that would make me start.

She gave a high, nervous laugh and then, from having wept and been so low, she grew almost giddy.