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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

gauge

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a fuel gauge (=an instrument for measuring fuel)
▪ I noticed the fuel gauge was on empty so I pulled into the nearest gas station.
gauge sb's mood (=try to decide what someone's mood is)
▪ He looked at her for a moment, trying to gauge her mood.
gauge sb’s reaction (=judge or find out someone’s reaction)
▪ He watched Jane’s face, trying to gauge her reaction.
narrow gauge
▪ a narrow gauge railway
rain gauge
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
fine
▪ The YC5 or YC6 fits both the fine and standard gauge machines.
▪ At least when you're knitting on the bigger gauges you have fewer rows to knit than on a fine or standard gauge.
▪ In patient 2 the tip of a fine 0.018 inch gauge guidewire was amputated in the liver parenchyma.
▪ The Knitmaster and Silver standard and fine gauge electronics are different to the punchcard for the last exercise too.
▪ The fine and standard gauge Silver electronics and the Knitmaster electronics are different to the punchcard machines.
▪ There is an electronic lace carriage for standard and fine gauge machines.
▪ Silver Reed tell me that the fine gauge lace carriage has to be tuned to the needlebed.
▪ On Silver and Knitmaster standard and fine gauge electronics the setting is slightly different.
narrow
▪ It is the latest shot in the battle to re-construct the 23-mile narrow gauge line.
▪ He also built a narrow gauge railway which ran round the whole estate.
▪ At the Port Lilla was placed back on narrow gauge track for the journey up to the Quarry.
▪ Then the narrow gauge became the standard Voice over A rail system based on a horse's behind.
▪ At first glance there appears to be a preponderance of narrow gauge or what I would call miniature railways.
▪ The car rattled along, crossing the myriad narrow gauge loco tracks that ran between the factories lining the route.
standard
▪ The YC5 or YC6 fits both the fine and standard gauge machines.
▪ At least when you're knitting on the bigger gauges you have fewer rows to knit than on a fine or standard gauge.
▪ Finally, one exciting development is the electronic intarsia carriage for use with the standard gauge electronic machine.
▪ The line was seven miles long, single track, and of standard gauge.
▪ All these accessories fit all Silver standard gauge punchcard machines.
▪ Remove the stitches from the standard gauge machine with the garter bar and replace them on the chunky machine.
▪ Apart from these, the other accessories available for the standard gauge models are not available for the fine and chunky gauges.
■ NOUN
fuel
▪ The driver glanced at his fuel gauge.
▪ She doesn ` t see the fuel gauge needle waving desperately at her, like a drowning arm.
▪ As we headed up Hartshead Moor, I checked my fuel gauge and started sweating again.
▪ A Land Rover mechanic replaced the stabiliser unit behind the dash - the fuel gauge worked again but not the temperature gauge.
▪ The ever-moving needle on the tank-mounted fuel gauge will remind you.
▪ The fuel gauge read a little over half full.
▪ He was installing a fuel gauge on top of the tank when it blew up.
line
▪ It is the latest shot in the battle to re-construct the 23-mile narrow gauge line.
machine
▪ The YC5 or YC6 fits both the fine and standard gauge machines.
▪ Remove the stitches from the standard gauge machine with the garter bar and replace them on the chunky machine.
▪ One a standard gauge machine use a three or four-ply yarn, or a Chunky yarn on a Chunky machine.
▪ Use 60 needles on a standard gauge machine, 40 on a Chunky.
▪ Most standard gauge machines like these acrylics, knitting art about tension six or seven, according to the make of machine.
▪ That's tension 0 on both carriages on standard gauge machine.
▪ There is an electronic lace carriage for standard and fine gauge machines.
▪ Tuck stitch knitted in 4-ply mohair on every other needle on a standard gauge machine with the No. 4 switch on.
pressure
▪ On tickover, oil pressure gauge drops to zero and green warning light flickers.
▪ The pressure gauge tells you how much air you have left in your tank prices range from 30 pounds upwards.
▪ It did not matter whether it was the oil pressure gauge or anything else.
▪ Autoclaves are functioning but neither the pressure gauge, thermometer, nor the timer are working.
railway
▪ He also built a narrow gauge railway which ran round the whole estate.
▪ Some miles south and east there is another narrow gauge railway.
temperature
▪ He noticed to his alarm that the oil temperature gauge was twice its normal reading.
▪ Upon arrival, he was welcomed to Hades and the host promptly set the temperature gauge at 110 degrees.
▪ A Land Rover mechanic replaced the stabiliser unit behind the dash - the fuel gauge worked again but not the temperature gauge.
▪ The temperature gauge on the Studebaker was back in the red, almost to 220 again.
▪ I am very keen to retain its originality, but I would like to add a temperature gauge.
▪ The exhaust-gas-#temperature gauge read hot.
▪ Below are the carb heat controls and there is a carburettor induction temperature gauge on the panel with a Left/Right engine switch.
▪ The outside air temperature gauge proved very accurate - immediately we entered the red we started to collect ice.
track
▪ At the Port Lilla was placed back on narrow gauge track for the journey up to the Quarry.
▪ A highlight of the visit is the steam train rides along the centre's short standard gauge track.
▪ Some of the narrow gauge tracks were short in distance, but the longest was 20 miles.
■ VERB
use
▪ The audited consolidated accounts for the year in question will be used as the gauge by which to determine the profits.
▪ If you had set the pitch of the blades using a pitch gauge this will, of course, upset your careful adjustments.
▪ Drum manufacturers have developed techniques to use lighter gauge steel.
▪ I use heavy gauge strings: 11, 13, 18, 28, 38, 48.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a narrow-gauge screw
▪ a narrow-gauge track
▪ an oil pressure gauge
▪ the car's gas gauge
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ At first glance there appears to be a preponderance of narrow gauge or what I would call miniature railways.
▪ He checked the contents of his billfold and prayed over his gas gauge, that it stay above Empty round-trip.
▪ He surprised everybody by choosing a 7 foot gauge to increase capacity and improve the ride.
▪ Key in the ignition, nothing in the glove compartment and the petrol gauge read empty.
▪ Retail sales are a gauge of consumer spending, which accounts for two-thirds of economic activity.
▪ The bottom of the screen houses the club selection, wind gauge, power indicator and shoot button.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
how
▪ This she did, gauging how much was left in the glass by the amount in the other glasses.
▪ Sandison tried to gauge how many he had already had but was unsure.
▪ Floy glanced over his shoulder, trying to gauge how far they had come and in which direction the road now lay.
▪ Don't dot the foundation all over the face to begin with because it's difficult to gauge how much is needed.
▪ It is difficult to gauge how far the internet might become a vehicle for free information.
■ NOUN
reaction
▪ Pieper tried and failed to get hold of the outfits to brief them and to gauge their reaction.
▪ Jim took a few steps toward the students to gauge their reaction.
▪ He watched Jehana's face, trying to gauge her reaction.
▪ The young man gauged her reaction and bought an emerald green ribbon which he handed to her.
▪ The lights went down and he sat at the back, trying to gauge the reaction of a packed audience.
▪ After spending a few months gauging public reaction, West Mercia Police intend to use him as a kerbside deterrent against speeding.
▪ Thames Valley Police say the trials are as much to gauge public reaction to the batons as to assess their usefulness to officers.
▪ The effect of the Moscow trials is difficult to gauge from the immediate reaction.
■ VERB
try
▪ He is testing, trying to gauge the mind of the jury.
▪ That might explain what Dole is trying to gauge in the brief encounters along the campaign trail.
▪ She tried to gauge his mood.
▪ She stands there tapping that thermometer against her wrist watch, eyes whirring while she tries to gauge this new man.
▪ He watched Jehana's face, trying to gauge her reaction.
▪ Bradley had distinguished himself early in his career by trying to gauge the distance to the stars.
▪ Floy glanced over his shoulder, trying to gauge how far they had come and in which direction the road now lay.
▪ But now we haven't the stop to prevent our timber sliding as we try to gauge it.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Recent polls have gauged the president's support at 85% or more.
▪ They hope to find ways to gauge the effectiveness of drug rehab programs.
▪ When all the figures are available, it should be possible to gauge how much we'll need to spend.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Bingham says they're ones for the future but how can we gauge their potential on a substitutes' bench.
▪ He is testing, trying to gauge the mind of the jury.
▪ If champions are gauged by their ability to win tough fights, Marco Antonio Barrera has quite a future.
▪ Indeed, sitting through the replay it was difficult to gauge whether it was live or not.
▪ Often sessions would include psychological tests designed to gauge workers' personality traits: extroverted, introverted, thoughtful, or driving.
▪ Pieper tried and failed to get hold of the outfits to brief them and to gauge their reaction.
▪ She stands there tapping that thermometer against her wrist watch, eyes whirring while she tries to gauge this new man.
▪ Use a combination square to gauge the location and depth of the cutout.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Gauge

Gauge \Gauge\ (g[=a]j), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Gauged; p. pr. & vb. n. Gauging] [OF. gaugier, F. jauger, cf. OF. gauge gauge, measuring rod, F. jauge; of uncertain origin; perh. fr. an assumed L. qualificare to determine the qualities of a thing (see Qualify); but cf. also F. jalon a measuring stake in surveying, and E. gallon.] [Written also gage.]

  1. To measure or determine with a gauge.

  2. To measure or to ascertain the contents or the capacity of, as of a pipe, barrel, or keg.

  3. (Mech.) To measure the dimensions of, or to test the accuracy of the form of, as of a part of a gunlock.

    The vanes nicely gauged on each side.
    --Derham.

  4. To draw into equidistant gathers by running a thread through it, as cloth or a garment.

  5. To measure the capacity, character, or ability of; to estimate; to judge of.

    You shall not gauge me By what we do to-night.
    --Shak.

Gauge

Gauge \Gauge\, n. [Written also gage.]

  1. A measure; a standard of measure; an instrument to determine dimensions, distance, or capacity; a standard.

    This plate must be a gauge to file your worm and groove to equal breadth by.
    --Moxon.

    There is not in our hands any fixed gauge of minds.
    --I. Taylor.

  2. Measure; dimensions; estimate.

    The gauge and dimensions of misery, depression, and contempt.
    --Burke.

  3. (Mach. & Manuf.) Any instrument for ascertaining or regulating the dimensions or forms of things; a templet or template; as, a button maker's gauge.

  4. (Physics) Any instrument or apparatus for measuring the state of a phenomenon, or for ascertaining its numerical elements at any moment; -- usually applied to some particular instrument; as, a rain gauge; a steam gauge.

  5. (Naut.)

    1. Relative positions of two or more vessels with reference to the wind; as, a vessel has the weather gauge of another when on the windward side of it, and the lee gauge when on the lee side of it.

    2. The depth to which a vessel sinks in the water.
      --Totten.

  6. The distance between the rails of a railway.

    Note: The standard gauge of railroads in most countries is four feet, eight and one half inches. Wide, or broad, gauge, in the United States, is six feet; in England, seven feet, and generally any gauge exceeding standard gauge. Any gauge less than standard gauge is now called narrow gauge. It varies from two feet to three feet six inches.

  7. (Plastering) The quantity of plaster of Paris used with common plaster to accelerate its setting.

  8. (Building) That part of a shingle, slate, or tile, which is exposed to the weather, when laid; also, one course of such shingles, slates, or tiles. Gauge of a carriage, car, etc., the distance between the wheels; -- ordinarily called the track. Gauge cock, a stop cock used as a try cock for ascertaining the height of the water level in a steam boiler. Gauge concussion (Railroads), the jar caused by a car-wheel flange striking the edge of the rail. Gauge glass, a glass tube for a water gauge. Gauge lathe, an automatic lathe for turning a round object having an irregular profile, as a baluster or chair round, to a templet or gauge. Gauge point, the diameter of a cylinder whose altitude is one inch, and contents equal to that of a unit of a given measure; -- a term used in gauging casks, etc. Gauge rod, a graduated rod, for measuring the capacity of barrels, casks, etc. Gauge saw, a handsaw, with a gauge to regulate the depth of cut. --Knight. Gauge stuff, a stiff and compact plaster, used in making cornices, moldings, etc., by means of a templet. Gauge wheel, a wheel at the forward end of a plow beam, to determine the depth of the furrow. Joiner's gauge, an instrument used to strike a line parallel to the straight side of a board, etc. Printer's gauge, an instrument to regulate the length of the page. Rain gauge, an instrument for measuring the quantity of rain at any given place. Salt gauge, or Brine gauge, an instrument or contrivance for indicating the degree of saltness of water from its specific gravity, as in the boilers of ocean steamers. Sea gauge, an instrument for finding the depth of the sea. Siphon gauge, a glass siphon tube, partly filled with mercury, -- used to indicate pressure, as of steam, or the degree of rarefaction produced in the receiver of an air pump or other vacuum; a manometer. Sliding gauge. (Mach.)

    1. A templet or pattern for gauging the commonly accepted dimensions or shape of certain parts in general use, as screws, railway-car axles, etc.

    2. A gauge used only for testing other similar gauges, and preserved as a reference, to detect wear of the working gauges.

    3. (Railroads) See Note under Gauge, n., 5. Star gauge (Ordnance), an instrument for measuring the diameter of the bore of a cannon at any point of its length. Steam gauge, an instrument for measuring the pressure of steam, as in a boiler. Tide gauge, an instrument for determining the height of the tides. Vacuum gauge, a species of barometer for determining the relative elasticities of the vapor in the condenser of a steam engine and the air. Water gauge.

      1. A contrivance for indicating the height of a water surface, as in a steam boiler; as by a gauge cock or glass.

      2. The height of the water in the boiler.

        Wind gauge, an instrument for measuring the force of the wind on any given surface; an anemometer.

        Wire gauge, a gauge for determining the diameter of wire or the thickness of sheet metal; also, a standard of size. See under Wire.

Wikipedia

Gauge (bore diameter)

The gauge of a firearm is a unit of measurement used to express the diameter of the barrel. Gauge is determined from the weight of a solid sphere of lead that will fit the bore of the firearm, and is expressed as the multiplicative inverse of the sphere's weight as a fraction of a pound, e.g., a one-twelfth pound ball fits a 12-gauge bore. Thus there are twelve 12-gauge balls per pound, etc. The term is related to the measurement of cannon, which were also measured by the weight of their iron round shot; an 8 pounder would fire an 8 lb (3.6 kg) ball.

Gauge is commonly used today in reference to shotguns, though historically it was also used in large double rifles, which were made in sizes up to 2 bore during their heyday in the 1880s, being originally loaded with black powder cartridges. These very large rifles, sometimes called elephant guns, were intended for use in India and Africa for hunting dangerous game.

Gauge is abbreviated "ga.", "ga", or "G". The space between the number and the abbreviation is often left out, as in "12ga".

Gauge (knitting)

In knitting, the word gauge is used both in hand knitting and machine knitting; the latter, technical abbreviation GG, refers to "Knitting Machines" fineness size. In both cases, the term refers to the number of stitches per inch, not the size of the finished garment. In both cases, the gauge is measured by counting the number of stitches (in hand knitting) or the number of needles (on a knitting machine bed) over several inches then dividing by the number of inches in the width of the sample.

Gauge (band)

Gauge was an American post-hardcore band from the northwest suburbs of Chicago, Illinois.

Gauge (software)

Gauge is a light weight cross-platform test automation tool. It provides the ability to author test cases in the business language. It has an extremely modular plugin supported architecture, which make it very flexible and scalable. It uses Behavior Driven Development (BDD) and Test-driven development (TDD) for functional testing of the application.

Some of its key features include:

  • A rich markup based on markdown
  • Support for writing test code in any programming language.
  • A modular architecture with plugin support.
  • Consistency across language implementations.

The currently supported languages for test code in gauge are:

  • Java
  • Ruby
  • C#
  • Javascript
  • Python

Category:Software testing tools

Gauge

Gauge (US , UK or ) may refer to:

Gauge (actress)

Gauge (born July 24, 1980) is the stage name of an American pornographic actress and featured dancer.

Gauge (instrument)

A gauge or gage, in science and engineering, is a device used to make measurements or in order to display certain information, like time. A wide variety of tools exist which serve such functions, ranging from simple pieces of material against which sizes can be measured to complex pieces of machinery. Depending on usage, a gauge can be described as "a device for measuring a physical quantity", for example "to determine thickness, gap in space, diameter of materials, or pressure of flow", or "a device that displays the measurement of a monitored system by the use of a needle or pointer that moves along a calibrated scale".

Wiktionary

gauge

n. 1 A measure; a standard of measure; an instrument to determine dimensions, distance, or capacity; a standard 2 An act of measuring. 3 Any instrument for ascertaining or regulating the level, state, dimensions or forms of things; as, a rain gauge; a steam gauge. 4 A thickness of sheet metal or wire designated by any of several numbering schemes. 5 (context rail transport English) The distance between the rails of a railway. 6 (context mathematics analysis English) A semi-norm; a function that assigns a non-negative size to all vectors in a vector space. 7 (context knitting English) The number of stitches per inch, centimetre, or other unit of distance. 8 (cx nautical English) Relative positions of two or more vessels with reference to the wind. 9 (cx nautical English) The depth to which a vessel sinks in the water. 10 (cx plastering English) The quantity of plaster of Paris used with common plaster to make it set more quickly. 11 That part of a shingle, slate, or tile, which is exposed to the weather, when laid; also, one course of such shingles, slates, or tiles. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To measure or determine with a gauge; to measure the capacity of. 2 (context transitive English) To estimate. 3 (context transitive English) To appraise the character or ability of; to judge of. 4 (context textile transitive English) To draw into equidistant gathers by running a thread through it. 5 (context transitive English) To mix (a quantity of ordinary plaster) with a quantity of plaster of Paris. 6 (context transitive English) To chip, hew or polish (stones, bricks, etc) to a standard size and/or shape.

WordNet

gauge

  1. n. a measuring instrument for measuring and indicating a quantity such as the thickness of wire or the amount of rain etc. [syn: gage]

  2. accepted or approved instance or example of a quantity or quality against which others are judged or measured or compared [syn: standard of measurement]

  3. the distance between the rails of a railway or between the wheels of a train

  4. the thickness of wire

  5. diameter of a tube or gun barrel [syn: bore, caliber, calibre]

  6. v. judge tentatively or form an estimate of (quantities or time); "I estimate this chicken to weigh three pounds" [syn: estimate, approximate, guess, judge]

  7. rub to a uniform size; "gauge bricks"

  8. determine the capacity, volume, or contents of by measurement and calculation; "gauge the wine barrels"

  9. measure precisely and against a standard; "the wire is gauged"

  10. adapt to a specified measurement; "gauge the instruments"

  11. mix in specific proportions; "gauge plaster"

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

gauge

"ascertain by exact measurements," mid-15c., from Anglo-French gauge (mid-14c.), from Old North French gauger (Old French jauger), from gauge "gauging rod," perhaps from Frankish *galgo "rod, pole for measuring" or another Germanic source (compare Old Norse gelgja "pole, perch," Old High German galgo; see gallows). Related: Gauged; gauging. The figurative use is from 1580s. "The spelling variants gauge and gage have existed since the first recorded uses in Middle English, though in American English gage is found exclusively in technical uses" [Barnhart].

gauge

"fixed standard of measure," early 15c. (surname Gageman is early 14c.), from Old North French gauge "gauging rod" (see gauge (v.)). Meaning "instrument for measuring" is from 1680s.

Usage examples of "gauge".

I finished mounting antennas, rain gauge, wind vane, and anemometer on the roof of our control tower, it looked more like some scientific outpost than a deer blind.

She could very finely gauge what would annoy Aunty Em, what was safe and what was not.

Consequently, investments large and small are accurately gauged in the current business, whereas estimates of their value are downwardly biased in a potential new business.

When they were over South Georgia and the Okefenokee Swamp, Bluey opened an eye, glanced at the instrument gauges, then went back to sleep.

Thermometers, atmospheric drift gauges, barometers, and bolometers were projected through vacuum suction tubes.

Ray Chen, for example, had been a go-to man for gauge boson and multidimensional field equations but even he bowed his head a few times and consulted with a pure mathematician in Britain.

Rod levels, capacitor flow, compensators, thruster controls, rackers, pressure gauges, and the jeklight radiation charge.

Henri de la Fontaine Coq began to finger the controls and to watch the gauges so intently that there could be no doubt there was something not right with the engine.

Among these operators are the Hamiltonian, whose eigenvalues give the energy and hence the mass of the vibrational state, as well as operators generating various gauge symmetries that the theory respects.

The latter contains Nobel and Schoene elutriators, together with viscosimeters of the flow and the Coulomb and Clark electrical types, sieves, voluminometers, colorimeters, vernier shrinkage gauges, micrometers, microscopes, and the necessary balances.

We become focused on our emotional needs, using sex to express those needs, to gauge our compatibility and desirability, instead of allowing sex to release us from the daily rigors of adult concerns, fears, and obligations: In her practice, the Tigress allows for periods of engaging in mild exhibitionism, periods for flirting and showing off to acquire men, and periods for secret sexual interludes.

The results of this test, when compared with those of the Bichel gauge, indicate that, for explosives of high detonation, the lead block is quite accurate, but for slow explosives, such as gunpowder, the expansion of the gases is not fast enough to make comparative results of value.

Mokameh Ghat, necessitated by a break of gauge, was done by a Labour Company which held the contract for handling goods throughout the length of the broad-gauge railway.

I had no need to excuse Armelline, for the princess and the cardinal had gauged her capacities.

I read the gauge, squinted up at the sun, and then jabbed a finger on an isobar to one edge of the map.