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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

fumes

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
breathe fumes
▪ These children are breathing traffic fumes all day long.
toxic chemicals/substances/fumes/gases
▪ Toxic chemicals were spilled into the river.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
diesel
▪ Further risks are the increase in diesel fumes, back injuries, dermatitis and stress-related problems - all increasing in coal mines.
▪ He could not avoid it, he took a lungful of the diesel fumes from the taxi as it pulled away.
▪ The large square was crowded, dusty and clamorous and full of diesel fumes and the smell of fried onions.
▪ The most likely cause was thought to be diesel exhaust fumes.
▪ The juice was marvellous, cutting through the taste of dust and diesel fumes.
noxious
▪ It follows last April's evacuation of Kirkby swimming pool after scores of schoolchildren were overcome by noxious fumes.
▪ The site would clean toxin-laced dirt by burning it, sending noxious fumes into nearby skies.
▪ The atmosphere consisted of nothing but the noxious fumes of burnt bodies: the recyclers couldn't cope.
toxic
▪ We campaigned ferociously to ban the stuff that could kill people in minutes with its toxic fumes.
▪ The other, in 1972, happened when a man was overcome by toxic fumes.
▪ They give off thick black toxic fumes, which often prove to be more lethal than the flames themselves.
▪ Also, you may throw on the fire something that gives off toxic fumes.
▪ There was serious talk of ecological suicide, criminal irresponsibility and the evils of toxic fumes merging with alcoholic ones.
▪ Do not use the stove inside a tent because of the risk of fire and toxic fumes.
▪ Rubbish litters our countryside, toxic fumes are belched into our air and radioactive discharge pollutes our seas.
▪ This apparently disposes of the toxic fumes much more safely.
■ NOUN
exhaust
▪ Trailed by a cloud of exhaust fumes, he accelerated up the road.
▪ Some scientists are concerned about long-term exposure to low levels of manganese oxides from car exhaust fumes.
▪ The carbon deposit was thought to come from car exhaust fumes from a large car park close to the church.
▪ The exhaust fumes from the cars and buses pour in through the open windows of our bus.
▪ The combination of early breakfast, exhaust fumes and nerves is a potent cocktail!
▪ He said he only wanted to kill himself and claimed he ate rat poison and planned to inhale car exhaust fumes.
▪ The so-called hybrid bus is virtually silent and produces fewer exhaust fumes.
▪ As his engines speeded up on the runway, a little flap would open on the ground to catch the exhaust fumes.
petrol
▪ She has to be the biggest money-grabber this side of Gordon Brown crazed on petrol fumes.
▪ It's into the car and close the boot, Petrol fumes instead of soot.
▪ I am worried about possible toxic effects, from the petrol fumes, and the asbestos.
▪ It appears he lit a cigarette which ignited the petrol fumes.
■ VERB
breathe
▪ The National Institute on Drug Abuse has estimated that 1, 000 teens die annually by breathing fumes from easily accessible products.
give
▪ Also, you may throw on the fire something that gives off toxic fumes.
▪ And there is the paint they use which gives off really bad fumes.
▪ Do not buy foam-filled furniture if you can avoid it, as it can give oft lethal fumes when it ignites.
▪ The lime was mixed with flowers of sulphur so that the walls would give off sulphurous fumes when they got warm.
▪ It's giving off smelly fumes.
▪ Some rags, which had apparently been used to wipe it out, gave off oil fumes.
▪ It was a sort of devil's crucible, giving off poisonous fumes, just like a bowl of vitriol.
▪ The solvent-weld cement gives off powerful fumes and should not be used in a confined space.
overcome
▪ It follows last April's evacuation of Kirkby swimming pool after scores of schoolchildren were overcome by noxious fumes.
▪ The other, in 1972, happened when a man was overcome by toxic fumes.
▪ Grom, having overcome his initial surprise, howled with pain and anger before he was overcome by the fumes.
▪ Eighteen-year-old Jennie Whalley was overcome by carbon monoxide fumes while sitting in a car parked in a garage.
▪ Mrs Ellen Morpeth is thought to have been overcome by fumes after the chair she was sitting on caught fire.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A strong smell of paint fumes filled the studio.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ According to the latest figures at least two youngsters die every week as a direct result of inhaling solvent fumes.
▪ Frequently, people throw water in front of their doors, and the dust gives way to mud and malodorous fumes.
▪ Investigators concluded damaged wiring may have provided the spark that ignited fumes in the fuel tank.
▪ Some scientists are concerned about long-term exposure to low levels of manganese oxides from car exhaust fumes.
▪ The atmosphere was being poisoned, every green thing blighted, and every stream fouled with chemical fumes and waste.
▪ The carbon deposit was thought to come from car exhaust fumes from a large car park close to the church.
WordNet

fumes

n. gases ejected from an engine as waste products [syn: exhaust, exhaust fumes]

Wiktionary

fumes

n. (plural of fume English) vb. (en-third-person singular of: fume)