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Fried

Fried may refer to:

Fried (album)

Fried is the second solo album by Julian Cope.

Fried (TV series)

Fried aired on BBC 2W in March/April 2002. Produced by Aspect Television and presented by Simon Adams, it was a mix of short films profiling real people throughout Wales with spoof profiles of fake people and events.

Fried (2015 TV series)

Fried is a British sitcom that airs on BBC Three. The show stars Katy Wix, Mandeep Dhillon, Matthew Cottle, William Melling, Imran Yusuf and Lorna Gayle. It began airing on 25 August 2015 and the first series ran for six episodes until 29 September 2015. A show pilot was aired on BBC iPlayer in 2014.

Fried (band)

Fried are a musical duo made up of US soul singer Jonte Short, and ex- The Beat and Fine Young Cannibals guitarist David Steele.

David Steele looked for a singer for his new project away from The Beat and Fine Young Cannibals for five years. He finally met Jonte Short in 2001 at the New Orleans Jazz Festival and they decided to collaborate. Steele and Short worked together on songs that Steele had already written, and they also wrote new ones together. The duo decided to name themselves Fried, after Southern U.S. cooking, and started recording in New Orleans and London.

Fried, after working on their album for five years, signed to London Records the home of Steele's previous group Fine Young Cannibals to release their debut self-titled album, which spawned the singles "Whatever I Choose I Lose" and "When I Get Out Of Jail". However, the band's career with the label was short-lived and were subsequently dropped from the label due to poor sales.

In 2007, however, the band were re-signed, this time to RCA and Fried decided to re-work their debut album and three new songs were added, while removing two. "I'll Be There" was released as the album's lead single, while they re-titled the album Things Change. The album was released on 16 July 2007.

Fried (surname)

Fried is a Yiddish-language surname that is exclusively Ashkenazic Jewish and a German-language surname of German ancestry.

  • Alfred Hermann Fried, Austrian Jewish pacifist, publicist, journalist, Nobel Peace Prize winner in 1911
  • Avraham Fried, popular musical entertainer in the Orthodox Jewish community
  • Charles Fried, conservative American jurist and lawyer
  • Daisy Fried, American poet
  • Daniel Fried, United States career diplomat, Ambassador and Special Envoy
  • David L. Fried, scientist, best known for his contributions to optics
  • Erich Fried, poet known for his political-minded poetry
  • Eugen Fried (1900–1943), Czechoslovak communist who played a leading role in the French Communist Party
  • Ferdinand Fried, the pen-name of Ferdinand Zimmermann German (economist and writer)
  • George Fried, American sea captain
  • Ina Fried, senior editor for All Things Digital
  • Jake Fried, artist and animator
  • Michael Fried (art critic), Modernist art critic and art historian
  • Nicolás Alejandro Massú Fried (born 1979), Chilean Olympic champion tennis player
  • Oskar Fried, German conductor and composer
  • Volker Fried, former field hockey player from West Germany
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

fried

adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cooked/fried breakfast (=bacon, egg, toast etc)
▪ Do you feel like having a cooked breakfast?
fried chicken (=cooked in oil)
▪ They filled their plates with fried chicken.
fried fish (=cooked in hot oil)
▪ We’re going to have fried fish tonight.
fried/poached/boiled etc eggs
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
bread
▪ The fried bread surrounding the bacon in the hot plate was simply to create effect and mop up the excess fat.
▪ Then he speared a square of fried bread and dipped it in, turning it about until it was yellow all over.
▪ Sure enough I got mushrooms and fried bread as well as bacon and egg and tomato, and porridge beforehand.
▪ At this moment they were enjoying a sustaining breakfast of sausages, bacon, eggs and fried bread.
▪ His wife, Tessa, ate fried bread and tomatoes.
▪ Watching a kid fiddling around with fried bread.
▪ Sausages, bacon, eggs, chips, baked beans and fried bread was a man's diet.
chicken
▪ There was a fried chicken place open on Baker Street, about the only thing that was.
▪ He hoped she would choose a hamburger or fried chicken, anything which would be fast and convenient.
▪ At each meal she willingly cleaned her plate, eating ice cream and fried chicken until she felt bloated.
egg
▪ Foodstuff varies from fried egg and chips to sausage rolls and sponge cakes.
▪ He kept their backsides so warm you could have fried eggs and bacon on them!
▪ Aunt Edie served up a supper of fried eggs, bacon and tomatoes with bread and butter.
▪ His fried eggs were a bit scrappy: they needed a woman's touch.
food
▪ I eat everything that's bad - fried food, chips, fish fingers, chocolate, cream.
▪ The place smelled of fried food and damp.
▪ Do you eat fried food as a general rule? 2.
▪ This fat includes everything from the obvious fats like butter and oil to those hidden in cakes, biscuits and fried foods.
▪ Avoid onions, beans, peas and heavily fried foods.
potato
▪ The loss of vitamin C in fried potatoes has been investigated but the results show considerable variation according to conditions.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Aunt Edie served up a supper of fried eggs, bacon and tomatoes with bread and butter.
▪ Bread, rolls, breakfast cereal, bananas and fried fruit are ideal.
▪ Divide the fried bananas between the four pancakes and roll each pancake up.
▪ Fish roe, taramasalata, fried scampi.
▪ The fried bread surrounding the bacon in the hot plate was simply to create effect and mop up the excess fat.
WordNet

fried

See fry

fried

adj. cooked by frying in fat [syn: deep-fried]

fry

  1. v. be excessively hot; "If the children stay out on the beach for another hour, they'll be fried"

  2. cook on a hot surface using fat; "fry the pancakes"

  3. kill by electrocution, as in the electric chair; "The serial killer was electrocuted" [syn: electrocute]

  4. [also: fried]

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Fried

Fried \Fried\ (fr[imac]d), imp. & p. p. of Fry.

Fried

Fry \Fry\ (fr[imac]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Fried (fr[imac]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Frying.] [OE. frien, F. frire, fr. L. frigere to roast, parch, fry, cf. Gr. ?, Skr. bhrajj. Cf. Fritter.] To cook in a pan or on a griddle (esp. with the use of fat, butter, or olive oil) by heating over a fire; to cook in boiling lard or fat; as, to fry fish; to fry doughnuts.

Wiktionary

fried

  1. 1 Cooked by frying. 2 (context specifically of an egg English) Being fried with the yolk unbroken. 3 (context colloquial of computer equipment English) broken as a result of excessive heat or an electrical surge. 4 (context slang English) stoned; under the influence of drugs v

  2. (en-pastfry)

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

fried

mid-14c., past participle adjective from fry (v.). Friend chicken attested by 1832.

Usage examples of "fried".

Fifty eggs well fried will yield about five ounces of this oil, which is acrid, and so enduringly liquid that watch-makers use it for lubricating the axles and pivots of their most delicate wheels.

No food element has been more closely linked to arterial aging than these kinds of fats, found mostly in meats, full-fat dairy products, baked goods, fried fast foods, and palm and coconut oils.

Fried caterpillars are not bad, Baas, nor are locusts when you can get nothing else.

To this the bookseller chef added fried potatoes from another dish, and poured for his guest a glass of wine.

Add a sliced onion fried, half a dozen sliced tomatoes, and salt, cayenne, and lemon-juice to season.