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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

fit

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a built-in/fitted cupboardBritish English (= ones that are there permanently and cannot be moved)
▪ The kitchen has built-in cupboards.
a fit of laughter (=a period in which you laugh uncontrollably)
▪ Her funny stories had us in fits of laughter.
a fit of rage
▪ In a fit of rage, he seized the poor man by the shoulders and shouted at him.
a fit of (the) giggles (=a short time when you laugh a lot in a way you cannot control)
▪ The boys collapsed in a fit of giggles.
a fit/flash/burst of temper (=when you are very angry for a short time)
▪ A businessman assaulted his wife and son in a fit of temper, a court heard yesterday.
a fit/outburst of anger (=an occasion when someone suddenly becomes angry)
▪ His occasional outbursts of anger shocked those around him.
a fitted carpet (=cut to fit a room, and fixed to the floor)
▪ Do you prefer rugs or a fitted carpet?
a fitting climax (=a very suitable one)
▪ The concert was a very successful occasion and a fitting climax to the school year.
a fitting end to sth (=right for a particular situation or occasion)
▪ The fireworks display was a fitting end to the celebrations.
a tight fit (=it fits too tightly)
▪ The jacket is rather a tight fit.
be a tight squeeze/fit
▪ Six in the car will be a tight squeeze.
epileptic fit
▪ He had an epileptic fit.
fit a pattern (also conform to a patternformal) (= match a particular pattern)
▪ Last week’s bombing fits this pattern.
fit in/into a space
▪ Decide what kind of table and chairs will fit best into the space.
fit into a category
▪ Rogers doesn’t fit into either category.
fit the mould (=be like other things of the same type)
▪ She doesn't fit the mould of the stereotypical mother.
fit/conform to a stereotype (=be like the usual idea of something)
▪ He doesn’t fit the stereotype of a Stanford student.
fit/lay a carpet (=cut it to fit a room and fix it to the floor)
▪ Will it cost extra to have the carpet fitted?
fit/match a description (=be like the person in a police description)
▪ The first man they arrested did not fit the description given by the victim.
fitted/built-in wardrobes (=wardrobes built against a wall or fitted between two walls)
fitting room
hissy fit
▪ Williams threw a hissy fit when she decided her hotel room wasn’t big enough.
in a fit of jealousy (=because a sudden feeling of jealousy makes you do something)
▪ In a fit of jealousy, Ben broke off their engagement.
in a fit of pique
▪ He stormed out in a fit of pique.
just/fitting (=appropriate and right)
▪ Death would be a just punishment.
keep fit
▪ Peter cycles to work to keep fit.
keep fit
physically fit
▪ It is important to keep yourself physically fit.
pipe fitter
the punishment should fit the crime (=it should be appropriate)
▪ The public believe that the punishment should fit the crime.
threw a conniption fit
▪ My mother threw a conniption fit when I didn’t come home till two in the morning.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
all
▪ Would you like to wear a size 10 or 12 dress that fitted all over?
▪ The Centralism principles all fit together.
▪ No, but the engine and gearbox and front axle will all fit.
▪ And it all fitted, didn't it?
▪ Robert's sorrow and regret seemed genuine, but it all fitted in with what Dawn had told her.
▪ It all fitted neatly into place.
▪ Can we all fit in along this short wall?
easily
▪ It is usually simplest if a washing machine can go next to the sink, but it can easily fit in other places.
▪ But a little beef now and then can easily fit in a well-balanced diet.
▪ Yet, overlapping is inevitable whenever risk categories fit easily into more than one compartment.
▪ Our own children have not seen much evidence that women can easily fit a career around a marriage and motherhood.
▪ They housed children who could not find foster parents or who were too old to fit easily into a new family environment.
▪ Teacher Song, a slender man, fit easily into the crawl space.
▪ Range Rover diffs will fit easily but, with a worn engine, will probably make the consumption worse than it is.
▪ They may seem a lot, but in fact they fit easily into a single bag.
neatly
▪ Secondly, there is a temptation to attach a diagnostic label to each condition so that it fits neatly on the problem list.
▪ Your resume should fit neatly on to two pages.
▪ Some designs fit neatly into circles and would be suitable for, say, small turned boxes, coasters or shallow platters.
▪ This does not mean that no Republican can be found who would fit neatly into a Clinton Cabinet.
▪ The Smiths fit neatly into this strategy as the exception to the rule.
▪ It is noteworthy that none of the students interviewed for this book fits neatly into these or other equally simplistic categories.
▪ Consequently what does not fit neatly into existing experience is anomalous and apt to seem mystically dangerous.
▪ The two neatly fit under the city gate, and the groom counted a third fool to himself.
perfectly
▪ They always fit perfectly, look painted on, and some have caused quite a furore in the past.
▪ The martini perfectly fits the bill because of its simplicity.
▪ John Bowes perfectly fits that bill.
▪ His cerebral sound fits perfectly with the cool musings of Mulligan and Baker.
▪ They had altered the dress so that it fitted perfectly.
▪ The roll fits perfectly well if you stand it on the roller and lean it against the wall.
▪ Until that moment Sabour had seemed to fit perfectly into the demoralized atmosphere of the classroom.
together
▪ A Youngman protégé could take over the old boy's lecturing responsibilities and everything would fit together rather nicely.
▪ Similarly, a child with a visual-spatial difficulty may not easily notice how different building materials or action figures fit together.
▪ Did her excitement at the way the evidence fitted together mean she wanted it to be true?
▪ They were fitted together like spoons.
▪ Then you will understand how all the pieces fit together.
▪ The world and I fit together so well!
▪ Instead it works as an artistic whole: these performers fit together.
▪ Rather, they are a fitting together of parts, each with its integrity intact.
well
▪ In addition, these styles do not fit well with walnut dining room tables and candlelit evenings.
▪ Lessons from the Visual Perception and Sound units fit well with work on the human body.
▪ To prevent problems you must take care in buying shoes that fit well.
▪ This is a strong assumption, but it fits well into the approach taken in this study which abstracts from intraindustry heterogeneity.
▪ It was well fitted out, with a formidable medicine chest.
▪ But last spring, they seemed more than players with talents that fit well together and friends that got along comfortably.
▪ Exploratory techniques are extremely well fitted to sociolinguistic research.
▪ The low-growing peacock gingers also would fit well in such a grouping.
■ NOUN
description
▪ The description certainly didn't fit Gloria.
▪ Their descriptions fit this monster exactly.
▪ If the description fits some one else in the office, take action.
▪ The description fit the 1997 Giants, too, perhaps even better than the originals.
▪ The description fits the man we saw outside the opera the other night.
▪ In a city of 500, 000, that description could fit tens of thousands.
▪ The description fits her, Brother.
▪ Only our titles and job descriptions fit into the frame.
shoe
▪ To prevent problems you must take care in buying shoes that fit well.
▪ Williams made his return wearing his infamous red shoes that had specially fitted insoles for his arch.
▪ His little red hat and shoes still fitted him.
▪ I should have been kitted out a week earlier but they'd got no shoes to fit me.
▪ If the shoe fits...
▪ The only shoes which would fit me were a pair of ski-boots.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be fitted with sth
▪ All the ground floor windows were fitted with iron bars, a sufficient deterrent for the average break-and-enter boys.
▪ And you must notice in this new first smoker the seats and backs are fitted with embossed crimson leather.
▪ Before leaving the hospital Thursday, he was fitted with a portable brain-wave monitor that he was to wear for 24-48 hours.
▪ But how many diesel cars are fitted with catalysts?
▪ Doors will now have to be fitted with special safety devices to prevent people or objects getting trapped in them.
▪ Most myopic children can be fitted with glasses with concave lenses which will bring their vision to normal.
▪ This point means that where a motor vehicle is required to be fitted with wipers it must also have washers.
fit/fill the bill
▪ A floral design with a Regency stripe background, for example, fits the bill perfectly.
▪ And the martini fits the bill?
▪ But it also fits the bill because people could order their favorite liquor.
▪ It is revealing, therefore, to see what sort of people are thought to fit the bill in these places.
▪ It just happened that Bobby filled the bill in this case.
▪ Many other jobs get handed out simply because a minister happens to know some one who might fit the bill.
▪ The fact that she and Hugh happened to fit the bill seemed to give her every opportunity for finding out.
▪ The martini perfectly fits the bill because of its simplicity.
moment/fit of madness
▪ A brief moment of madness, I admit.
▪ Essex are likely to fine Neil Foster for his moments of madness yesterday.
▪ Francis made his will in a moment of madness.
▪ Grandcourt finds Gwendolen screaming in a fit of madness.
▪ He wondered if the bad blood of the d'Urbervilles was to blame for this moment of madness.
▪ In a moment of madness Rosenoir kicked Alan Kernaghan as he lay on the ground.
▪ It was a moment of madness.
▪ Just that one brief moment of madness ... Then the bitter tears of self-reproach.
ready/fit for the knacker's yard
sb's face doesn't fit
survival of the fittest
▪ And as all we fifths of six know, life is, ahem, strictly survival of the fittest.
▪ It is survival of the fittest out there and if I had to do it again I believe I would.
▪ Skiing involves the survival of the fittest.
▪ The law of the survival of the fittest was not made by man.
▪ These are metaphors of battle, struggle and the survival of the fittest.
▪ They call it survival of the fittest, although it's their own survival they are now worried about.
▪ We are now entering the era of strict personal accountability, value for money, and survival of the fittest.
violent headache/fit etc
▪ A violent headache can be safely dissolved within minutes without having to resort to aspirin or paracetamol with their accompanying side-effects.
▪ He still paid with violent headaches, but it could have been so much worse.
▪ They were both attacked, one having a violent headache, the other being possessed as I now realised I had been.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A man fitting that description was seen running from the park.
▪ Do these shoes still fit you?
▪ Does your key fit the lock on the garage door?
▪ He's put on so much weight that his clothes don't fit any more.
▪ I'm going to have a new exhaust system fitted next week.
▪ I'm looking for the puzzle piece that fits here.
▪ I had to fit new locks after the burglary.
▪ The pants fit fine, but the jacket's too small.
▪ The pants were a little tight at first, but after I wore them a few times, they fit like a glove.
▪ We've designed a computer that fits into an ordinary briefcase.
▪ We were going to put the fridge between the stove and the washing machine, but it wouldn't fit.
▪ Will this bag fit in the trunk?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Assess how your possessions fit into your new lifestyle together.
▪ He had to get his suits tailored to fit him.
▪ On the plus side, a fold-down Plexiglas cover is fitted to the front of the saw, ahead of the blade.
▪ Ptolemy's epicycles could still fit the data.
▪ The concept fitted the times, for this was a yeasty period.
▪ They had altered the dress so that it fitted perfectly.
II.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
fully
▪ Head-injured patients are normally admitted to hospital and kept there until it is certain that they are fully fit to return home.
▪ Once the children were fully fit, the family went on to Paris, where they stayed for two months.
▪ Still it gives Wallace, Speed and Strachan? chance to get fully fit.
▪ This check up shows he's fully fit to carry out his strenuous lifestyle as a hospital porter.
▪ And manager Walter Smith said he would not play him unless he was fully fit.
▪ I know Gazza is not yet fully fit.
▪ A fully fit Rodney Warriner behind the stumps would be an obvious bonus.
physically
▪ Questions will be asked, even if they are not asked publicly, about whether he is physically fit to continue in office.
▪ He must have been physically fit to survive the punishing schedule to which he submitted himself.
▪ A person with odd knowledge, odd skills, physically fit.
▪ For these reasons industry is moving towards a concept of the ideal worker as a physically fit adaptable young person.
▪ Singing the booking form shows that you believe yourself and your companions to be physically fit and healthy to take part.
▪ There are numerous flights of stairs, therefore the tour is only suitable for reasonably physically fit people.
reasonably
▪ Foot notes: this is a cracking circuit which should be within the capacities of any reasonably fit walker.
▪ You must be reasonably fit and be sure you can handle the prevailing wind, weather and tidal conditions.
■ NOUN
state
▪ I was in no fit state to move a muscle.
▪ He was in no fit state to know.
▪ An innkeeper can refuse service to any person who is not in a fit state to be received at the inn.
▪ If she'd stayed in a fit state then she wouldn't have found herself in this situation now.
▪ When I was in a fit state she asked if I would like to talk to her.
▪ With so many major projects in hand she wanted to make sure that everything was in a fit state.
▪ But he was in no fit state.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
fighting fit
▪ Consequently, it hosts an excellent wild brown trout population and fish are pink-fleshed and fighting fit, averaging 10oz in weight.
▪ Masie had responded brilliantly to treatment and seemed fighting fit.
▪ She was taken in by Maggie Taylor and now five month old Teka is fighting fit and lapping up all the attention.
fit/fill the bill
▪ A floral design with a Regency stripe background, for example, fits the bill perfectly.
▪ And the martini fits the bill?
▪ But it also fits the bill because people could order their favorite liquor.
▪ It is revealing, therefore, to see what sort of people are thought to fit the bill in these places.
▪ It just happened that Bobby filled the bill in this case.
▪ Many other jobs get handed out simply because a minister happens to know some one who might fit the bill.
▪ The fact that she and Hugh happened to fit the bill seemed to give her every opportunity for finding out.
▪ The martini perfectly fits the bill because of its simplicity.
moment/fit of madness
▪ A brief moment of madness, I admit.
▪ Essex are likely to fine Neil Foster for his moments of madness yesterday.
▪ Francis made his will in a moment of madness.
▪ Grandcourt finds Gwendolen screaming in a fit of madness.
▪ He wondered if the bad blood of the d'Urbervilles was to blame for this moment of madness.
▪ In a moment of madness Rosenoir kicked Alan Kernaghan as he lay on the ground.
▪ It was a moment of madness.
▪ Just that one brief moment of madness ... Then the bitter tears of self-reproach.
ready/fit for the knacker's yard
sb's face doesn't fit
survival of the fittest
▪ And as all we fifths of six know, life is, ahem, strictly survival of the fittest.
▪ It is survival of the fittest out there and if I had to do it again I believe I would.
▪ Skiing involves the survival of the fittest.
▪ The law of the survival of the fittest was not made by man.
▪ These are metaphors of battle, struggle and the survival of the fittest.
▪ They call it survival of the fittest, although it's their own survival they are now worried about.
▪ We are now entering the era of strict personal accountability, value for money, and survival of the fittest.
throw a fit/tantrum
▪ Rogers threw a fit when he didn't get the sales account.
▪ But she could not go home, given how she felt; fit to throw a tantrum.
▪ Hannah cried furiously and frequently threw tantrums when she had to put them on in the morning.
▪ He threw a tantrum when she complained he should have treated her earlier.
▪ He could throw a tantrum or a punch.
▪ If you have children, you may have experienced them coming home from school and immediately throwing a tantrum in front of you.
▪ Try to avoid surprises and avoid throwing a tantrum yourself.
▪ You will not scream and throw a tantrum.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Cycling is a good way to keep fit.
▪ I stay fit by swimming for an hour each morning.
▪ Just because you're in your sixties doesn't mean you can't be physically fit.
▪ Sandy's very fit - he runs almost 30 miles a week.
▪ Sandy's very fit - he runs five miles every day.
▪ We've got a match next month, so we've got to keep ourselves reasonably fit.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All are contented, happy, fit and well.
▪ In May, Harvey wrote to say that he and his wife were now fit to return to duty.
▪ The Allstar forward has been battling against injury lately and is given a 50/50 chance of being fit for Sunday.
▪ We might speculate that those with dementia would be less willing to participate in a research project than the mentally fit.
▪ When will Mark Tinkler be fit?.
III.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
close
▪ To support the foot during play there is a lateral support strap which also ensures that the shoe has a close fit.
▪ The easiest way to rectify this is to carefully file away any excess metal until a closer fit is achieved.
▪ Thousands of plants and animals reveal a close fit between the divisions revealed by genes and the groups long used by classifiers.
▪ The first was its close fit with observed inheritance.
▪ Technical advances in fleece continue apace such as with the stretch version which gives improved insulation and greater mobility through a closer fit.
▪ It doesn't have to be a close fit, initially you want a very loose fitting so there's a draught.
coughing
▪ This time, it did not dissolve into a coughing fit.
▪ All thoughts of her had vanished in the midst of his hunger pangs and coughing fits.
▪ Mrs Wright had a coughing fit, holding her chest and her eyes watering.
▪ He put the phone down and had a violent coughing fit.
▪ Suddenly a coughing fit seized him and a stab of agony lanced through him from back to front.
epileptic
▪ We are able to resume ourselves after sleep, after an alcoholic stupor, after an epileptic fit, after prolonged coma.
▪ When you pulled her close, she shook all over as if she were having an epileptic fit.
▪ Doctors at the National Epilepsy centre at the Park hospital in Oxford carry out research into what can trigger epileptic fits.
▪ Jean's son Darren died from a major epileptic fit three months after this interview.
▪ Mr Ballantyne said that he ran out of a drug used to control Mr Stockton's epileptic fits.
▪ He said he had never known a child die of an epileptic fit.
▪ Sadly, Rose suffered a major setback one day, when she had a grand mal epileptic fit.
good
▪ The evening suit was not a good fit and he looked as though he was part of a Marx brothers film.
▪ In what ways is the job a good fit for you? 2.
▪ This has been mostly in agricultural chemicals where tonnages have proved a good fit with Hickson's type of batch equipment.
▪ Starr is a good fit for other reasons.
▪ I had to admit that the frame was a good fit.
▪ In some ways the job had been a good fit, since he was clearly the best technical problem-solver in the organization.
▪ Try to find a shop that sells half-sizes and, even better, different widths to ensure a good fit.
▪ The concept was a good fit for Costco and Portland, where the company has its highest volume store.
loose
▪ In my own travels, I found a loose fit between learning that occurred at the workplace and in schools.
perfect
▪ Johnson is a perfect fit for Mississippi State.
▪ Sharp young coach and a perfect fit for a brand new team bursting with demographics.
▪ If we have a perfect fit between what we want and what we get we do not bother about priorities.
▪ I wanted him back because I thought he was a perfect fit for David as far as being vocal.
▪ The priorities are obviously included in the perfect fit.
▪ And for much of the play, it looks like an almost perfect fit.
▪ It's also the same height as your kitchen units for a perfect fit.
▪ Ogden and Arizona seem a perfect fit.
tight
▪ After turning the Disc you have a tighter fit, but not necessarily a better one.
▪ It was going to be a tight fit.
▪ This tighter fit enables caffeine to plug the receptor, thus preventing adenosine from binding.
▪ He got up as quickly as the tight fit of the table in the breakfast nook would allow.
▪ We arrive in Paris, and make a tight fit into a tiny chambre de bonne in the Fifteenth Arrondissement.
▪ Our two-part feature on Jack Alcock concludes on page 37. Tight fit.
■ VERB
cough
▪ I assumed she could sleep straight through a coughing fit.
find
▪ In putting a jigsaw puzzle together he may move the pieces around to improve his chances of finding a fit.
▪ In my own travels, I found a loose fit between learning that occurred at the workplace and in schools.
start
▪ It has continued in fits and starts ever since.
▪ But civilization was approaching in fits and starts.
▪ This means the machine tends to go forward in fits and starts, sometimes quite quickly but at other times embarrassingly slowly.
▪ The conversation is awkward, moving in fits and starts.
▪ Although change often unfolds in fits and starts, organisations can learn to improve.
▪ What was their history: had they progressed smoothly or with fits and starts?
▪ Street lighting is spasmodic and piped water comes in sluggish fits and starts.
▪ In fits and starts he told Seton, Ramsay, Gray and others the sorry tale.
suffer
▪ He hasn't suffered another fit since.
▪ Quite unharmed by her experience but suffering from a fit of the sulks.
▪ Perhaps she had suffered a small fit after all, or could it have been a touch of fever?
▪ After Darren was born, he had to stay in hospital an extra ten days because he suffered from epileptic fits.
▪ Last November we had the distressing experience of seeing Sam suffer an epileptic fit.
throw
▪ But nobody anticipated that Bob Dole would throw a nicotine fit.
▪ When I refused he threw a fit.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be fitted with sth
▪ All the ground floor windows were fitted with iron bars, a sufficient deterrent for the average break-and-enter boys.
▪ And you must notice in this new first smoker the seats and backs are fitted with embossed crimson leather.
▪ Before leaving the hospital Thursday, he was fitted with a portable brain-wave monitor that he was to wear for 24-48 hours.
▪ But how many diesel cars are fitted with catalysts?
▪ Doors will now have to be fitted with special safety devices to prevent people or objects getting trapped in them.
▪ Most myopic children can be fitted with glasses with concave lenses which will bring their vision to normal.
▪ This point means that where a motor vehicle is required to be fitted with wipers it must also have washers.
fighting fit
▪ Consequently, it hosts an excellent wild brown trout population and fish are pink-fleshed and fighting fit, averaging 10oz in weight.
▪ Masie had responded brilliantly to treatment and seemed fighting fit.
▪ She was taken in by Maggie Taylor and now five month old Teka is fighting fit and lapping up all the attention.
fit/fill the bill
▪ A floral design with a Regency stripe background, for example, fits the bill perfectly.
▪ And the martini fits the bill?
▪ But it also fits the bill because people could order their favorite liquor.
▪ It is revealing, therefore, to see what sort of people are thought to fit the bill in these places.
▪ It just happened that Bobby filled the bill in this case.
▪ Many other jobs get handed out simply because a minister happens to know some one who might fit the bill.
▪ The fact that she and Hugh happened to fit the bill seemed to give her every opportunity for finding out.
▪ The martini perfectly fits the bill because of its simplicity.
moment/fit of madness
▪ A brief moment of madness, I admit.
▪ Essex are likely to fine Neil Foster for his moments of madness yesterday.
▪ Francis made his will in a moment of madness.
▪ Grandcourt finds Gwendolen screaming in a fit of madness.
▪ He wondered if the bad blood of the d'Urbervilles was to blame for this moment of madness.
▪ In a moment of madness Rosenoir kicked Alan Kernaghan as he lay on the ground.
▪ It was a moment of madness.
▪ Just that one brief moment of madness ... Then the bitter tears of self-reproach.
ready/fit for the knacker's yard
sb's face doesn't fit
survival of the fittest
▪ And as all we fifths of six know, life is, ahem, strictly survival of the fittest.
▪ It is survival of the fittest out there and if I had to do it again I believe I would.
▪ Skiing involves the survival of the fittest.
▪ The law of the survival of the fittest was not made by man.
▪ These are metaphors of battle, struggle and the survival of the fittest.
▪ They call it survival of the fittest, although it's their own survival they are now worried about.
▪ We are now entering the era of strict personal accountability, value for money, and survival of the fittest.
throw a fit/tantrum
▪ Rogers threw a fit when he didn't get the sales account.
▪ But she could not go home, given how she felt; fit to throw a tantrum.
▪ Hannah cried furiously and frequently threw tantrums when she had to put them on in the morning.
▪ He threw a tantrum when she complained he should have treated her earlier.
▪ He could throw a tantrum or a punch.
▪ If you have children, you may have experienced them coming home from school and immediately throwing a tantrum in front of you.
▪ Try to avoid surprises and avoid throwing a tantrum yourself.
▪ You will not scream and throw a tantrum.
violent headache/fit etc
▪ A violent headache can be safely dissolved within minutes without having to resort to aspirin or paracetamol with their accompanying side-effects.
▪ He still paid with violent headaches, but it could have been so much worse.
▪ They were both attacked, one having a violent headache, the other being possessed as I now realised I had been.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I began running about a month ago to improve my physical fitness.
▪ I had a coughing fit that lasted nearly an hour.
▪ The magazine contained several articles about healthy eating, fitness, and exercise.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But his proposals for electoral reform, now moving ahead in fits and starts, contain no such provision.
▪ He started to have fits and he suffered permanent damage.
▪ I wanted him back because I thought he was a perfect fit for David as far as being vocal.
▪ The boy had a history of fits.
▪ This means the machine tends to go forward in fits and starts, sometimes quite quickly but at other times embarrassingly slowly.
IV.verb
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Assess how your possessions fit into your new lifestyle together.
▪ He had to get his suits tailored to fit him.
▪ Johnson found it full of weeds; today it is tailored and fitted.
▪ On the plus side, a fold-down Plexiglas cover is fitted to the front of the saw, ahead of the blade.
▪ Ptolemy's epicycles could still fit the data.
▪ The concept fitted the times, for this was a yeasty period.
▪ There are definite health benefits to being fit.
▪ They had altered the dress so that it fitted perfectly.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Fit

Fit \Fit\, v. i.

  1. To be proper or becoming.

    Nor fits it to prolong the feast.
    --Pope.

  2. To be adjusted to a particular shape or size; to suit; to be adapted; as, his coat fits very well.

Fit

Fit \Fit\, imp. & p. p. of Fight. [Obs. or Colloq.]

Fit

Fit \Fit\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Fitted; p. pr. & vb. n. Fitting.]

  1. To make fit or suitable; to adapt to the purpose intended; to qualify; to put into a condition of readiness or preparation.

    The time is fitted for the duty.
    --Burke.

    The very situation for which he was peculiarly fitted by nature.
    --Macaulay.

  2. To bring to a required form and size; to shape aright; to adapt to a model; to adjust; -- said especially of the work of a carpenter, machinist, tailor, etc.

    The carpenter . . . marketh it out with a line; he fitteth it with planes.
    --Is. xliv. 1

  3. 3. To supply with something that is suitable or fit, or that is shaped and adjusted to the use required.

    No milliner can so fit his customers with gloves.
    --Shak.

  4. To be suitable to; to answer the requirements of; to be correctly shaped and adjusted to; as, if the coat fits you, put it on.

    That's a bountiful answer that fits all questions.
    --Shak.

    That time best fits the work.
    --Shak.

    To fit out, to supply with necessaries or means; to furnish; to equip; as, to fit out a privateer.

    To fit up, to furnish with things suitable; to make proper for the reception or use of any person; to prepare; as, to fit up a room for a guest.

Fit

Fit \Fit\, n. [AS. fitt a song.] In Old English, a song; a strain; a canto or portion of a ballad; a passus. [Written also fitte, fytte, etc.]

To play some pleasant fit.
--Spenser.

Fit

Fit \Fit\, a. [Compar. Fitter; superl. Fittest.] [OE. fit, fyt; cf. E. feat neat, elegant, well made, or icel. fitja to web, knit, OD. vitten to suit, square, Goth. f?tjan to adorn.

  1. Adapted to an end, object, or design; suitable by nature or by art; suited by character, qualitties, circumstances, education, etc.; qualified; competent; worthy.

    That which ordinary men are fit for, I am qualified in.
    --Shak.

    Fit audience find, though few.
    --Milton.

  2. Prepared; ready. [Obs.]

    So fit to shoot, she singled forth among her foes who first her quarry's strength should feel.
    --Fairfax.

  3. Conformed to a standart of duty, properiety, or taste; convenient; meet; becoming; proper.

    Is it fit to say a king, Thou art wicked?
    --Job xxxiv. 18.

    Syn: Suitable; proper; appropriate; meet; becoming; expedient; congruous; correspondent; apposite; apt; adapted; prepared; qualified; competent; adequate.

Fit

Fit \Fit\, n.

  1. The quality of being fit; adjustment; adaptedness; as of dress to the person of the wearer.

  2. (Mach.)

    1. The coincidence of parts that come in contact.

    2. The part of an object upon which anything fits tightly.

      Fit rod (Shipbuilding), a gauge rod used to try the depth of a bolt hole in order to determine the length of the bolt required.
      --Knight.

Fit

Fit \Fit\, n. [AS. fit strife, fight; of uncertain origin.

  1. A stroke or blow. [Obs. or R.]

    Curse on that cross, quoth then the Sarazin, That keeps thy body from the bitter fit.
    --Spenser.

  2. A sudden and violent attack of a disorder; a stroke of disease, as of epilepsy or apoplexy, which produces convulsions or unconsciousness; a convulsion; a paroxysm; hence, a period of exacerbation of a disease; in general, an attack of disease; as, a fit of sickness.

    And when the fit was on him, I did mark How he did shake.
    --Shak.

  3. A mood of any kind which masters or possesses one for a time; a temporary, absorbing affection; a paroxysm; as, a fit of melancholy, of passion, or of laughter.

    All fits of pleasure we balanced by an equal degree of pain.
    --Swift.

    The English, however, were on this subject prone to fits of jealously.
    --Macaulay.

  4. A passing humor; a caprice; a sudden and unusual effort, activity, or motion, followed by relaxation or inaction; an impulsive and irregular action.

    The fits of the season.
    --Shak.

  5. A darting point; a sudden emission. [R.]

    A tongue of light, a fit of flame.
    --Coleridge.

    By fits, By fits and starts, by intervals of action and repose; impulsively and irregularly; intermittently.

Wikipedia

Fit

Fit or FIT may refer to:

Fit (manufacturing)

In precision mechanics, fit refers to the degree of 'looseness' with which an shaft is inserted into an orifice.

This coupling is related to the tolerance or allowance of both parts dimensions. The shaft and the orifice must be of a similar diameter, otherwise there will not be a correct adjustment. With this in mind, measurements have been internationally standarised according to ISO regulation to ensure the interchangeability of items and their mass production.

Tolerance values are designated with a capital letter in the case of orificies and lower case letters in the case of shafts. The lower the value the higher the machining costs, as a greater precision is required. <!-- texto a ocultar

Fit (2010 film)

Fit is a 2010 film written and directed by Rikki Beadle-Blair, and commissioned by the Gay Rights Charity Stonewall. It is adapted from the 2008 play of the same name about the everyday lives of a group of both gay and straight millennial students taking drama and dance class. The original play had been developed in 2008 to address the growing problem of homophobic bullying in British schools, and was especially created for KS3 students, with a specific focus on learning objectives from the National Curriculum including PHSE and Citizenship. The film itself was opened in the form of an introductory chapter, with six interlinking chapters of fifteen minutes, each focusing on one of the main characters in a first-person perspective of their life, views and problems. The DVD release of Fit also contained five video diaries for each of the characters, giving students and other viewers the opportunity to listen to the characters talking more in-depth about their feelings and the situation they are facing.

The 2008 play performed in theatre venues including -

  • The Drill Hall
  • The Birmingham Rep
  • The Contact Theatre
  • The Unity Theatre, Liverpool
  • The CCA, Glasgow

The play was also performed in various schools in England and Scotland. At one point there was minor controversy in the media, with articles in the Daily Mail and on The Guardian's website. The 2008 cast had included Duncan MacInnes, Ludvig Bonin, Sasha Frost, Lydia Toumazou, Stephen Hoo, Jay Brown and Rikki Beadle-Blair. In the film adaption in 2010, there was a new script, with the original cast staying as the central characters, and being joined by others. The film has won many awards and the leading actors fly to Los Angeles for Outfest Film Festival for the World Premiere of Fit at the Directors Guild of America on Sunset Blvd.

WordNet

fit

  1. n. a display of bad temper; "he had a fit"; "she threw a tantrum"; "he made a scene" [syn: tantrum, scene, conniption]

  2. a sudden uncontrollable attack; "a paroxysm of giggling"; "a fit of coughing"; "convulsions of laughter" [syn: paroxysm, convulsion]

  3. the manner in which something fits; "I admired the fit of her coat"

  4. a sudden flurry of activity (often for no obvious reason); "a burst of applause"; "a fit of housecleaning" [syn: burst]

  5. [also: fitting, fitted, fittest, fitter]

fit

  1. adj. meeting adequate standards for a purpose; "a fit subject for discussion"; "it is fit and proper that you be there"; "water fit to drink"; "fit for duty"; "do as you see fit to" [syn: fit to(a), fit for(a)] [ant: unfit]

  2. (usually followed by `to' or `for') on the point of or strongly disposed; "in no fit state to continue"; "fit to drop"; "laughing fit to burst"; "she was fit to scream"; "primed for a fight"; "we are set to go at any time" [syn: fit(p), primed(p), set(p)]

  3. physically and mentally sound or healthy; "felt relaxed and fit after their holiday"; "keeps fit with diet and exercise" [syn: healthy] [ant: unfit]

  4. [also: fitting, fitted, fittest, fitter]

fit

  1. v. be agreeable or acceptable to; "This suits my needs" [syn: suit, accommodate]

  2. be the right size or shape; fit correctly or as desired; "This piece won't fit into the puzzle" [syn: go]

  3. satisfy a condition or restriction; "Does this paper meet the requirements for the degree?" [syn: meet, conform to]

  4. make fit; "fit a dress"; "He fitted other pieces of paper to his cut-out"

  5. insert or adjust several objects or people; "Can you fit the toy into the box?"; "This man can't fit himself into our work environment"

  6. be compatible, similar or consistent; coincide in their characteristics; "The two stories don't agree in many details"; "The handwriting checks with the signature on the check"; "The suspect's fingerprints don't match those on the gun" [syn: match, correspond, check, jibe, gibe, tally, agree] [ant: disagree]

  7. conform to some shape or size; "How does this shirt fit?"

  8. provide with (something) usually for a specific purpose; "The expedition was equipped with proper clothing, food, and other necessities" [syn: equip, fit out, outfit]

  9. make correspond or harmonize; "Match my sweater" [syn: match]

  10. [also: fitting, fitted, fittest, fitter]

Wiktionary

fit

Etymology 1

  1. suitable, proper. Etymology 2

    n. 1 The degree to which something fits. 2 Conformity of elements one to another. 3 The part of an object upon which anything fits tightly. 4 (context advertising English) how well a particular commercial execution captures the character or values of a brand. 5 (context statistics English) goodness of fit. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To be suitable for. 2 (context transitive English) To conform to in size and shape. 3 (context intransitive English) To be of the right size and shape, as of clothing. 4 (context transitive with ''to'' English) To make conform in size and shape. 5 # (context transitive English) To tailor; to change to the appropriate size. 6 (context transitive English) To be in agreement with. 7 (context transitive English) To adjust. 8 (context transitive English) To attach, especially when requiring exact positioning or sizing. Etymology 3

    n. (context archaic English) A section of a poem or ballad. Etymology 4

    n. 1 (context medicine, dated English) A seizure or convulsion. 2 (context medicine English) A sudden and vigorous appearance of a symptom over a short period of time. 3 A sudden outburst of emotion. 4 A sudden burst (of an activity). vb. (context intransitive medicine English) To suffer a fit.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

fit

1680s, "process of fitting," from fit (v.). From 1823 as "the fitting of one thing to another;" 1831 as "the way something fits."

fit

c.1400, "to marshal or deploy (troops);" early 15c. as "be fitting or proper, be suitable," from fit (adj.) and perhaps in part from Scandinavian (compare Old Norse fitja "knit"). From 1580s as "be the right shape." Transitive sense of "provide with what is suitable" is from 1590s; that of "make fit or suitable, bring into corresponding form or condition" is from c.1600. Related: Fitted; fitting. Fitted sheets is attested from 1948.

fit

"paroxysm, sudden attack" (as of anger), 1540s, probably via Middle English sense of "painful, exciting experience" (early 14c.), from Old English fitt "conflict, struggle," which is of uncertain origin, with no clear cognates outside English. Perhaps ultimately cognate with fit (adj.) on notion of "to meet." Meaning "sudden impulse toward activity or effort" is from 1580s. Phrase by fits and starts first attested 1610s (by fits is from 1580s).

fit

"suited to the circumstances, proper," mid-15c., of unknown origin, perhaps from Middle English noun fit "an adversary of equal power" (mid-13c.), which is perhaps connected to fit (n.1). In athletics, "in condition, properly trained for action," from 1869. Related: Fitter; fittest. Survival of the fittest (1867) coined by H. Spencer.

fit

part of a poem, Old English fitt, of unknown origin; perhaps related to fit (n.2).

Usage examples of "fit".

If he refuses to return and abjure his heresy and give fitting satisfaction, he is delivered to the secular Court to be punished.

In understandably emphasizing the importance and the urgency of eco-holistic fit, the holists have absolutized the Lower-Right quadrant, which, in thus sealing it off from any true integration, condemns it to the fate of all fragments.

But Mary was shy of acceding to such invitations and at last frankly told her friend Patience, that she would not again break bread in Greshamsbury in any house in which she was not thought fit to meet the other guests who habitually resorted there.

I for one think it behooves us to find a more fitting way to salute Rome and Romulus than acrimonious and ill-mannered meetings of the Senate.

But he let Addle play the Fates, spinning out the length of the kiss and cutting it when she saw fit.

Many were too large to fit comfortably in buildings constructed on a human scale, and others, such as the Afanc and other water-dwellers, were unable to leave their own element, though they could move from Upper to Lower waters, and indeed, to other lakes and waterways in Gendival, via a network of subterranean waterways carved out by the Gaeorn long ago.

He found his suit ready made and fitted afore he thought he was half measured.

Beautiful Agami woodwork, larken-built, like all the best of the Agami: each panel was made of thousands of pieces of wood, some as large as a thumbnail, some as small as a splinter, each one invisibly glued into place, fitted together like the pieces of a puzzle.

Like mine, it was Agami larken woodwork, each side made of hundreds of smaller pieces carefully fit together, but this was not nearly as nice a piece of work as mine.

Making the trip down ten flights would be the ultimate way to flip off her agoraphobia, a fitting cap to her week of desensitization and self-improvement.

Carnia were up in arms, that numerous bands of robbers had descended from the mountains of Ziccola and Agrapha, and had made their appearance on the other side of the gulf, they resolved to proceed by water to Prevesa, and having presented an order which they had received from Ali Pasha, for the use of his galliot, she was immediately fitted out to convey them.

The population was derived almost wholly from the agriculturists of the old order, and since agriculture had been considered a sluggish and base occupation, fit only for sluggish natures, the planet was now peopled with yokels.

Looking at creation, which is filled with objects of the senses, they came up with a special term, Akasha, to fit the soul.

She had the broad features common to the Akka people and the broad shoulders of a woman who has tackled a lot of reindeer, and it was hard to tell whether she contemplated those dogs with such an avid gaze because they looked fit to serve her, or to be eaten for supper.

Dincrist was the picture of a patrician-sportsman, even taller than Alacrity and very fit, white-haired and deeply tanned.