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Fisheye

Fisheye may refer to:

  • The eye of a fish or other aquatic creature resembling a fish
  • Fisheye, a character from the anime Sailor Moon
  • Fisheye (album), the second album by the alternative rock band Callalily
  • FishEye (software), a revision-control browser by Atlassian Software Systems
  • Fisheye lens, an ultra wide-angle lens used in photography
  • FishEye Winery, owned by The Wine Group
  • The ◉ symbol

FishEye (software)

FishEye is a revision-control browser and search engine owned by Atlassian, Inc. Although FishEye is a commercial product, it is freely available to open source projects and non-profit institutions. In addition to the advanced search and diff capabilities, it provides:

  • the notion of changelog and changesets - even if the underlying version control system (such as CVS) does not support this
  • direct, resource-based URLs down to line-number level
  • monitoring and user-level notifications via e-mail or RSS

However it lacks some basic capabilities that exist in other revision-control browsers (e.g. Trac, Redmine) such as being able to compare different revisions of a folder, or compare two folders (such as branches and tags). This is widely seen as a critical omission and vastly reduces Fisheye's usefulness as a tool in managing the software release process.

Fisheye (album)

Fisheye is Callalily's second album released on March 7, 2008 by Sony Music. It contains singles Susundan, Ako'y Babalik and Hintay.

Through this second album it showed that the band has truly matured with their music, illustrating a louder and more powerful display of Callalily’s sound and showmanship.

Wiktionary

fisheye

a. (context photography of a lens English) Covering an extremely wide angle and producing a circular image that is distorted towards the edges. n. 1 An unfriendly or suspicious glance. 2 An undesirable effect in paint, particularly automotive finishes, normally caused by oil or other contaminants on the painted surface.

WordNet

fisheye

adj. of or relating to a fisheye lens [syn: wide-angle]

Usage examples of "fisheye".

The top surface of the computer is smooth except for a fisheye lens, a polished glass dome with a purplish optical coating.

In this way, a narrow beam of any color can be shot out of the innards of the computer, up through that fisheye lens, in any direction.

Neither Hiro nor Eliot ever mentions, or even notices, the by-now-obvious fact that Fisheye is traveling with a small, self-contained nuclear power source - almost certainly radiothermal isotopes like the ones that power the Rat Thing.

As long as Fisheye refuses to notice this fact, it would be rude for them to bring it up.

When Eliot informs them that these are pirate vessels, Vic and Fisheye prick up their ears.

Hiro is still absorbing that when Fisheye makes an unexpected decision.

As the laughter on the railing dies away, Hiro hears a new sound: a low whirring noise from the direction of Fisheye, and from the atmosphere around them, a tearing, hissing noise, like the sound just before a thunderbolt strikes, like the sound of sheets being ripped in half.

When Fisheye becomes aware of this, he pulls the trigger again, the barrels whirl themselves up into a transparent cylinder, and the tearing, hissing noise begins again.

Vic and Fisheye sit down in the main cabin belowdecks, eating, going through Chinese magazines, looking at pictures of Asian chicks, and occasionally looking at nautical charts.

Then he realizes why it seems so much lighter: most of its weight was ammunition, and Fisheye used up quite a bit.

He triggered the full-circle display, the fisheye appearing in the lower corner of his sight where peripheral vision would pick it up.

He returned to the control panel facing the corridor and slapped on his fisheye scan at the end of a row of dials.

Miles plucked his scanner fisheye and returned it to its case, and keyed his wrist comm.

The old geezer behind the counter gave me a fisheye, no doubt wondering where the devil I wanted to go to this time without buying anything.

But with Aunt Elizabeth safely tucked away, she had tiptoed down to the front door and peered through the fisheye peephole that provided a good view of the vestibule from the elevator on the left to the stairwell doors opposite.