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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

fire

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bomb/fire/terrorist etc alert
▪ a full-scale flood alert
a devastating flood/fire/earthquake etc
▪ The country is still recovering from last year's devastating floods.
a fire crew
▪ Fire crews took more than three hours to bring the blaze under control.
a fire hazard
▪ The unoccupied building was declared a fire hazard.
a fire/emergency exit (=a special door, used if there is an emergency or a fire)
▪ Fire crews discovered that the club’s fire exit door had been locked.
a fire/smoke alarm
▪ A fire alarm went off and the building had to be evacuated.
a forest fire
▪ Forest fires have broken out across the region.
a gas fire (=an object that burns gas to heat a room)
▪ She turned on the gas fire.
be destroyed by fire/a bomb/earthquake etc
▪ The building was destroyed by fire in 2004.
be fired (up) with enthusiasm (=be very enthusiastic and keen to do something)
▪ She came back from the course fired up with enthusiasm.
cease fire! (=used to order soldiers to stop shooting)
crime/accident/fire etc prevention
▪ Effective crime prevention must be our main goal.
▪ a fire prevention officer
fire a bullet
▪ Police fired rubber bullets to break up the crowd.
fire a shot
▪ The passenger in the car fired three shots.
fire a weapon (=shoot a gun or missile)
▪ Police were told not to fire their weapons.
fire alarm went off
▪ We were in the middle of an exam when the fire alarm went off.
fire alarm
▪ We were in the middle of an exam when the fire alarm went off.
fire ant
fire blazing
▪ The room was warm, with a fire blazing in the hearth.
fire brigade
fire chief
fire department
fire door
fire drill
fire engine
fire escape
fire exit
fire extinguisher
fire fight
fire fighting
fire hydrant
fire iron
fire off an emailinformal (= send it quickly, especially because you are angry about something)
▪ I fired off an email to the hotel, saying how disgusted I was with their level of service.
fire retardant
▪ furniture treated with fire-retardant chemicals
fire sale
fire sb’s enthusiasm (=make someone feel very enthusiastic)
▪ At high school, Mr Jones really fired my enthusiasm for history.
fire service
fire spreads (also flames spread)
▪ The fire had spread to a nearby shed.
fire station
fire truck
fire/bounce ideas off one another (=discuss each other’s ideas and think of good new ones)
▪ Our regular meetings are opportunities to fire ideas off each other.
fired blanks
▪ Soldiers fired blanks into the crowd.
fired the opening salvo
▪ Congressman Saunders fired the opening salvo during a heated debate on capital punishment.
fired...gun
▪ I’ve never fired a gun in my life.
fire/stimulate sb's imagination (=make someone use their imagination)
▪ The aim of the exhibition is to stimulate people's imagination.
fire/storm/flood etc damage (=caused by fire, storm, flood etc)
▪ The campsite suffered extensive flood damage.
firing line
firing squad
hire and fire (=employ and dismiss people)
▪ the power to hire and fire
line of fire/attack/movement etc (=the direction in which someone shoots, attacks, moves etc)
▪ I was directly in the animal’s line of attack.
mortar fire
▪ A cameraman was killed when his vehicle came under mortar fire.
police/army/fire etc chief
▪ Los Angeles Police Chief Willie L. Williams
return fire (=shoot back at someone)
▪ One plane opened fire on the American aircraft, which immediately returned fire.
set off...fire alarm
▪ Someone set off the fire alarm.
started...fire
▪ I started a fire to warm the place up.
tackle a blaze/fire (=try to stop it)
▪ Fire crews tackling the blaze were hampered by exploding gas canisters.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
electric
▪ It was cold in the bedroom and she had shivered and kneeling down he had plugged in a small electric fire.
▪ I refer to people who, as I speak, are sitting at home, unable to put on their electric fires.
▪ Finally, J. got tired of my everlasting complaints, took pity on me and made me a small electric fire.
▪ One of his neighbours finds water dripping from the balcony above along her ceiling and out near her electric fire.
▪ In front of the grate was a tall electric fire with artificial coals, a high curved back and a triple set of burners.
▪ He connected a timeswitch to an electric fire.
▪ Or an electric fire tipped into the bath one afternoon?
friendly
▪ Few details were released of the precise circumstances of the friendly fire incidents which caused the casualties.
▪ Wednesday he re-introduced Kevin Pollak, injured and disfigured by friendly fire in the Gulf War.
▪ But what really hurts is the friendly fire.
▪ One step forward.New hope for truth about the victims of friendly fire.
open
▪ Never stand over an open fire as Victorian fathers used to do.
▪ Here, they sleep in bedrolls or in canvas tents, and eat hardtack and sip coffee heated over an open fire.
▪ Any kind of open fire needs a considerable volume of fuel to keep it alight.
▪ Clothes are hung from nails, and cooking is done over an open fire.
▪ Always put out an open fire before going to bed.
▪ Purists believe that roasting means exposing food to the direct heat of a hot, open fire.
▪ Put guards on all open fires.
▪ Do not put fluffy rugs in front of open fires, where they are in the direct line of sparks.
■ NOUN
chief
▪ Yet that is what fire chiefs say we should be doing if we want to make our homes safer.
▪ Brown swore in his new fire chief, Bob Demmons, during a ceremony Tuesday morning.
▪ There's no extra cash to pay for the search; fire chiefs are just hoping their alarm call is answered.
▪ After six months in office, Brown has named minorities to such high-profile spots as police and fire chiefs.
▪ The bowling alley fire in a neighboring town that killed five firemen when my father was deputy fire chief.
▪ Higuchi, a deputy fire chief for Los Angeles County since January 1994.
coal
▪ Raffles A lounge cellar bar with a relaxed atmosphere and a real coal fire.
▪ A coal fire made the room stuffy, the way he liked it.
▪ The office was a 2-bedroomed bungalow with a coal fire in the grate!
▪ The coal fire burned steadily away in the grate.
▪ It had central heating, a rarity in the experience of people like us who depended on open coal fires.
▪ Check the ventilation in each room, particularly if there are gas or coal fires.
▪ My neighbour's house is the only one in a block of seven with a coal fire.
▪ Other times we burn it either on the coal fire or garden bonfire and that produces ash and gases.
damage
▪ There is a great deal of information available about fire damage to property, but little on diseases related to industrial work.
▪ Most of the fire damage was confined to the restaurant and several Fox offices.
▪ In Wagon Mound the kind of damage that needed to be foreseeable was fire damage.
▪ Explosions that occur at high enough altitudes will lay down severe shock and fire damage without the fireball ever contacting the ground.
▪ It sustained a lot of fire damage when the labs went up.
▪ Recent incidents include £2 million fire damage to Bellahouston Academy in Glasgow.
▪ In 1917 Mawson was commissioned to replan Salonika, following extensive fire damage.
▪ This was as near as they dared to approach to avoid the risk of fire damage to the vehicles.
forest
▪ Think of the might of a forest fire or the burning heat of the sun.
▪ After a forest fire, it is always the first to spring forth.
▪ On one occasion a great forest fire raged through the area of Telegraph Station 30.
▪ However small the sparks at Azusa Street were, within a few decades, pentecostalism had become a full-fledged forest fire.
▪ Two were destroyed in forest fire work while the other three are firmly entrenched in museums.
▪ In a forest fire, you usually find areas among the trees that have some calming influence on it.
▪ The occurrence of scrub and forest fires provides another mechanism whereby rocks can be subjected to significant thermal expansion and contraction.
▪ It would start at a single mine, and then go like a forest fire from state to state.
gas
▪ Check whether an off-peak electric storage heater or a gas fire might be better choice.
▪ The Echo investigation highlighted a series of deaths caused by carbon monoxide poisoning from faulty gas fires.
▪ It had minimal busted furniture, yellow walls and a gas fire.
▪ Then out for a newspaper and some rolls, and he was sitting in front of the gas fire with a cup of coffee.
▪ She was beside the gas fire, just staring.
▪ She made herself a high tea, put the gas fire on full blast and sat with a tray in front of the television.
▪ He also lit the portable gas fire.
▪ She perched on the edge of the sofa, gazing into the mock flames from the gas fire.
hazard
▪ Mrs R. was a heavy smoker, and this was a fire hazard.
▪ The build-up of ice on roofs is also creating leaks that threaten internal wiring and pose a fire hazard.
▪ The road fizzled out at a gate plastered with fire hazard warnings, leading on to the moor itself.
▪ She knew all about fire hazards.
▪ Each component was hot dip galvanized prior to being brought on site and welding was avoided to eliminate potential fire hazards.
▪ A little broom has been planted, but not much because it is a fire hazard.
▪ The resulting rank heather is a severe fire hazard in areas attracting tourists.
▪ The restaurant clogs quickly into a cosy fire hazard.
house
▪ He became a hero when he rescued a number of people from a blazing house fire.
▪ Now Jack sees a way to escape from it all by faking his death in a house fire.
▪ The Safety Centre features full size mock-ups of nearly every danger a child could face including house fires and high speed trains.
▪ John Grant had always believed he was rescued as a baby from a house fire in which both his parents had died.
▪ An elderly man's died and a woman is critically ill in hospital after a house fire in Worcestershire.
▪ Read in studio Police investigating the death of a man in a house fire have now ruled out murder.
▪ Read in studio A faulty electricity meter is being blamed for starting a house fire which left six people in hospital.
▪ It is indeed true of the given description of the causal circumstance for the house fire that it could be much improved.
log
▪ An old pub with beamed ceilings, smoke-blackened, and a log fire crackling and spitting inside a deep alcove.
▪ The beamed lounge with its log fire is elegantly furnished in a country-house style.
▪ Comfort, quality and log fires.
▪ In the sitting room next door a log fire burned.
▪ We sat in chairs before a great log fire.
▪ It has been heated outside the room by a log fire under a petrol drum.
▪ The artificial log fire was burning brightly.
▪ They sat round a huge log fire, the flickering flames casting long shadows against the far wall.
mortar
▪ Their car came under mortar fire and they had to cross five military checkpoints.
▪ Each time we came in there was mortar fire and plumes of smoke.
▪ The mortar fire went on relentlessly, and showers of earth went up.
▪ Soldiers had parachuted across, but mortar fire had seen them off.
▪ I gave no thought to this until heavy mortar fire began to hit extremely close.
▪ Our firebase had been taking mortar fire from a wooded area some distance away.
▪ Around dawn they were hit with mortar fire.
■ VERB
build
▪ How to build a fire First make sure you've got enough dry timber of varying sizes to keep your fire going.
▪ You ever seen a face built out of fire, underwater?
▪ Here I built a small fire, and putting my back to the rock lit a cigarette.
▪ We built a great fire in the outdoor fireplace and roasted the steak, drank the beer, and talked.
▪ At Kaliro the hunters would build a small fire on a hill to show they were safe.
▪ She was built like a fire hydrant.
▪ Whilst the Technology was being built there was a fire at the school which meant an extra classroom had to be built.
▪ That evening before dinner, he built a fire.
burn
▪ You can burn in the fires of the damned for all I care.
▪ Tipis take on color from the wood you burn in your fire.
▪ One lorry was burnt out and a fire officers car was also damaged.
▪ No burning fires or heavenly choirs.
▪ I can hear the sounds of the wood burning in the fire, and the big clock on the stairs.
▪ It is the fire of race, and it is still burning.
▪ Only his eyes seemed alive, burning with a dark fire as he stared at her.
▪ The berries are then warmed over slowly burning peat fires until they sprout, a development that converts their starches into sugars.
catch
▪ A fault in the drying cycle means that the machine overheats and can catch fire.
▪ He caught fire and suffered fatal 80 percent burns.
▪ Richard Lugar or commentator Pat Buchanan have yet to catch fire.
▪ Sydney withdrew out of range and bombarded Emden with shells from her 6in guns until she caught fire.
▪ Worse, he was caught in the cross fire of local conflicts.
▪ We know that the next falling star is almost certain to get too close to the sun, and catch fire!
▪ The bond market had caught fire, and experienced salesmen such as himself were all at once much in demand.
cause
▪ It makes it clear that the fire caused the accident but it doesn't give any explanation of what caused the fire.
▪ The impact had mangled the plane but not caused a fire.
▪ It's known the fire in the tail caused the accident ... but not what caused the fire.
▪ After the fire investigators tested a similar oxygen canister to determine whether it could generate enough heat to cause the fire.
▪ This amount will not apply if the damage is caused by fire.
▪ Item: In Southern California, an inattentive tenant cooking a meal caused a grease fire.
▪ However, this reduces efficiency, wastes heat and causes a fire danger.
▪ We do not know what caused the fire and it is important for us to determine why.
destroy
▪ Jane wanders through the disaster, seeing that the house was destroyed by fire some months before.
▪ The Tuileries were destroyed by fire and it was rumoured that the Louvre had been burned down as well.
▪ The archives of the town in which I was born were destroyed by fire during the war.
▪ Only part of this extensive cloth and flock mill remains, much having been destroyed by fire.
▪ For, as it turned out, most of the copies of the pamphlet were destroyed in the fire that killed Dark.
▪ The original store and its entire stock of rare books, letters and autographs, was destroyed by fire in 1980.
die
▪ We told them to get out.Three deny they left twins to die in barn fire.
▪ Also patron of architects, builders, dying, fire prevention, founders, miners, and stonemasons.
▪ Ferrets die: Two ferrets died when fire swept through a garden shed in Ilkley Grove, Hartlepool.
▪ What about the father who arrived home to find his four children had died in a fire?
▪ Four times more likely to die from fires.
▪ In 1985 more than 50 people died in a fire at Bradford City Football Club.
▪ Eighty-four persons, including 25 children, died in the fire.
fight
▪ Five additional members were added to an existing committee entrusted with monitoring, fighting and controlling oil fires.
▪ Sitting there, I imagined Durrell at his computer, clicking out his program for fighting fire with fire.
▪ Lara Bagby thought her husband was still fighting the fire when she got a call from a relative.
▪ Further attempts to fight the fire were abandoned as thick acrid smoke filled the department.
▪ And the only way to get overtime is fighting fires.
▪ In the confusion of fighting the fire, the dinghy had gone overboard and was drifting away, trapping the crew.
▪ They had to wait a few minutes more for the arrival of a tanker truck with water to fight the fire.
light
▪ Lydia shivered and knelt to light the fire.
▪ As soon as I get up, I light the fire and put on a stainless steel pot for hot water.
▪ Very useful for lighting fires, wrapping fish, that sort of thing.
▪ But if it is defense that lights your fire, the Sooners always had the spark.
▪ They had come in the night and lit a fire under the stage.
▪ She ordered Gretel to make some bread and light the fire.
▪ Emily sat in her coat while Hudson lit the fire.
▪ After dark, they stopped and lit a small cooking fire, talking and laughing noisily.
return
▪ The Royal Engineers did not return fire and were let through.
▪ Madame Olenska rose, wound it up and returned to the fire, but without resuming her seat.
▪ He was dropped too early - but instead of sulking he has returned with his old fire.
▪ Our tanks and tracks kept going a little bit and stopped to return fire immediately.
▪ The troops returned fire and then retreated.
▪ By this time, of course, the Federals were returning the fire.
▪ Petion returned fire, and the grenade thrower pitched into the water with another grenade at the ready.
▪ Finding it was determined not to return the fire until after breakfast, I remained in bed.
set
▪ The intruders, thought to be youngsters, set the kitchen on fire and flooded the bathroom.
▪ He almost burned it down. Set a fire in the detention room.
▪ Actually, I set fire to my bed the other night.
▪ Got home and they had set fire to my crop.
▪ One of the men had set fire to the kitchen curtains.
▪ Manuel Perez's brother left after his house was set on fire.
▪ But if Rhodes hasn't set the world on fire with his batting, he certainly has with his fielding.
▪ Did he set the school on fire?
start
▪ Open fires should always have the chimney regularly swept, otherwise the build up of soot can start a chimney fire.
▪ Robles has confessed to starting seven fires since Aug. 1, authorities said.
▪ He hands me a billy and suggests I get some snow for water and a few twigs to start the fire.
▪ They found several oil bottles in his car of the same brand as one found at the starting point of the fire.
▪ They went indoors to find Donald splitting wood to start the fire.
▪ Finally, we started re-turning fire, and at that point, the mech unit finally got there.
▪ The wood contains sufficient natural oil to start the fire well.
▪ It started a fire which spread to the river bank.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a ball of fire
▪ A ball of fire he might be, but he'd made one big mistake!
▪ Douglas was a ball of fire all season.
▪ One witness described seeing a plume of moke and a ball of fire and then seeing a body on the road.
add fuel to the fire/flames
▪ It only added fuel to the fire.
▪ Once the process is under way, empire-building adds fuel to the fire, and more fat to the bureaucracy.
baptism of/by fire
▪ An as-yet-unproven system called J-STARS, getting its baptism of fire in the Gulf, illustrates the point.
▪ Beige popsters take a vicarious pride in the slow baptism of fire that their chosen genre and its protagonists underwent.
▪ Diana admits that she wasn't easy to handle during that baptism of fire.
▪ It had been a baptism by fire, but she had come through.
▪ It is almost impossible to see where events will lead but you are going through a baptism of fire.
▪ My baptism of fire had been with Leon Brittan who was Chief Secretary until the 1983 general election.
▪ This was our baptism of fire and we learned many lessons.
be in the firing line/in the line of fire
breathe fire
▪ Opposed, he could breathe fire; contradicted or challenged, he could put up his fists and fight.
▪ Ready to roar.Cricket's young dragons learning to breathe fire.
▪ Some of us need bosses and editors breathing fire down our necks.
▪ What is it that breathes fire into the equations and makes a universe for them to govern?
catch fire
▪ For some reason the charcoal isn't catching.
▪ Investigators said that a lit cigarette caused the curtains to catch fire.
▪ The car turned over, but luckily it didn't catch fire.
▪ There was an explosion, and the whole garage caught on fire.
▪ Two farm workers died when a barn caught fire yesterday.
▪ And the rivers of water were thick as sludge, slick enough with oil to catch fire.
▪ Each team started slowly offensively before catching fire in the final seven minutes of the opening period.
▪ Finally, the bird, while searching for the mouse, accidentally knocked over the woodpile, which caught fire.
▪ In the midst of this seemingly successful gesture, the hotel catches fire.
▪ Nine times out of ten it will catch fire in your hands.
▪ Sydney withdrew out of range and bombarded Emden with shells from her 6in guns until she caught fire.
▪ The whole thing could catch fire all over the front pages Crocus List and all.
▪ We know that the next falling star is almost certain to get too close to the sun, and catch fire!
come under attack/fire/scrutiny etc
▪ At a deeper level, however, the concept of the mentally abnormal female offender has come under scrutiny.
▪ He added that to be accurate, the aircraft would have to risk coming under fire.
▪ He said the company came under scrutiny along with other insurers after allegations were first made against Metropolitan Life in 1993.
▪ In addition to facing the ire of frustrated riders, Muni has also come under fire recently from federal safety officials.
▪ Patrick is generally regarded as having been an aggressive enforcer of civil-rights laws and often came under fire from conservatives.
▪ Police came under attack from bottles, bricks and plastic crates.
▪ Sir Derek came under fire from several shareholders.
▪ Their vehicle came under fire but was not hit.
fan a fire/flame etc
▪ David Cottis, London At what point does breeze fan a flame rather than douse it?
field of fire
▪ Harry blundering into the field of fire.
▪ The best place for most artillery is on a hill commanding a wide field of fire with long clear lines of sight.
▪ The first is that it preserves a clear field of fire for my missile troops.
▪ We had a good field of fire all round in case the enemy came out of the sunken road or over the hedge.
▪ We had triple concertina wire set up, claymores, and tripwires, and we even cut some fields of fire.
fight fire with fire
▪ Sitting there, I imagined Durrell at his computer, clicking out his program for fighting fire with fire.
▪ The official pronouncement was that they intended to fight fire with fire.
fire/emergency drill
▪ After selecting a field he carried out his emergency drills and shut down the engine.
▪ And practise a family fire drill.
▪ Immediately fire drills were followed and the building vacated.
▪ It was sabotaged by an unforeseen fire drill.
▪ So back to the fire drill.
▪ The advantage of fire drill thinking is that it reminds you that the worst really can happen.
▪ The local primary school nearest the naval base, Barne Barton, has an annual nuclear emergency drill.
flash flood/fire
▪ A couple of years ago these lanes were far from peaceful when a flash flood swept through the area.
▪ He believes Ruess probably died in a flash flood or fell off a cliff.
▪ In the event of a flash flood, remember that you should immediately seek higher ground.
▪ Like the desert after a flash flood, Freshers' Fair is decorated by societies which bloom for just a day.
▪ Summer flash floods achieve little beyond destroying crops.
▪ The report warns of extreme events such as thunderstorms causing flash floods and intense meteorological depressions.
▪ Urgent talks after flash flood causes chaos.
friendly fire
▪ But what really hurts is the friendly fire.
▪ Few details were released of the precise circumstances of the friendly fire incidents which caused the casualties.
▪ One step forward.New hope for truth about the victims of friendly fire.
▪ Wednesday he re-introduced Kevin Pollak, injured and disfigured by friendly fire in the Gulf War.
get on/along like a house on fire
hang fire
▪ But while their charges hang fire for three or four years, the company has made its joint.
▪ The case is hanging fire for the moment, pending some changes in the paperwork filed so far.
have several irons in the fire
hold (your) fire
open fire (on sth)
▪ Clothes are hung from nails, and cooking is done over an open fire.
▪ He is charged with ordering his subordinates to open fire on Tangi-Chu.
▪ Never stand over an open fire as Victorian fathers used to do.
▪ No wonder they had opened fire.
▪ Rebels hiding in jungle outside the village opened fire, killing one policeman.
▪ The battery... ascends the hill towards the Henry house and opens fire at close range.
▪ Then he opened fire at point-blank range, first at Cha, then at Park, severely wounding them both.
▪ There are two comfortable lounges with open fires, one with a large collection of books for guests to read.
out of the frying pan and into the fire
play with fire
▪ Dating the boss's daughter is playing with fire.
▪ Failure to stick to the safety rules is simply playing with fire.
▪ These men are criminals. If you get involved with them, you'll be playing with fire.
▪ Charity stunt team warned ... you're playing with fire.
▪ Manchester United continue to play with fire, losing 2-1 against Anderlecht.
▪ Roy Alon who appeared in many of the James Bond films said the team were playing with fire.
▪ She was playing with fire, in Lydia's opinion.
▪ Sir Hugo advises Deronda not to play with fire.
▪ So, your employer is playing with fire.
▪ The mask made him seem menacing, and she suddenly had the sensation that with Lucenzo she was playing with fire.
▪ With Emma he had played with fire and narrowly escaped burning.
poke the fire
quench a fire/flames
roaring fire
▪ A roaring fire was in the grate and the room was pleasantly warm.
▪ He was acutely aware of everything that had gone on in front of the then roaring fire.
▪ I built a roaring fire in the stove and baked some potatoes.
▪ The aristocrats would be the kindling for a roaring fire fueled by the fats of social exploitation.
set the Thames on fire
set the world on fire/alight
▪ And now we have Sliver which was the subject of much wrangling and hasn't exactly set the world on fire.
▪ But if Rhodes hasn't set the world on fire with his batting, he certainly has with his fielding.
▪ Either way, the speed and acceleration is not going to set the world on fire.
▪ It was a lovely accomplishment, of course, but nothing to set the world on fire with.
▪ None of the three papers was going to set the world on fire.
▪ The sonorities glow, and the whole thing is user-friendly without setting the world on fire.
streak of lightning/fire/light etc
▪ A streak of lightning split the sky.
▪ Sometimes there is hope, a streak of light, a blur on a piece of film.
▪ The three women were wreaking havoc with their guns that fired streaks of light.
▪ There was another streak of lightning overhead.
the fat is in the fire
there's no smoke without fire
▪ And if you believe there's no smoke without fire, Sean Young must be a towering inferno.
▪ But there's no smoke without fire.
wall of fire/water etc
▪ A wall of water a thousand feet high smashed down on Nagarythe.
▪ A few minutes later, a wall of water crashed over the lip of the Falls and Niagara was in business again.
▪ And they drove off into another amazing wall of water.
▪ But there was no wall of water crashing through the canyon.
▪ I watched as the roof of the house seemed to rest on the four walls of fire.
▪ Spray, driven by the wall of water, struck his face.
▪ Surrounding buildings had to be protected by a wall of water to stop them being engulfed by the flames.
▪ They had been through the wall of fire together.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A forest fire had been raging in the south and the sky in that direction had a deep red glow.
▪ Could you bring in some wood for the fire?
▪ Eleven people died in a fire in Chicago early Monday.
▪ In the evenings the whole family would gather around the fire.
▪ Investigators say the fire probably broke out in the hotel kitchen.
▪ Most animals are afraid of fire.
▪ My feet were on fire after the trek up the mountain.
▪ Police believe the fire in the store was started deliberately.
▪ The fire quickly spread throughout the building.
▪ The fire was started by an electrical fault.
▪ The old man lit a fire in the stove of the front room.
▪ The ship was hit by fire from a German plane.
▪ There's nothing more comforting than a blazing log fire.
▪ There was a sudden burst of machine gun fire.
▪ We noticed that the enemy fire was now being directed at our part of the field.
▪ When did humans first learn to use fire?
▪ Winds quickly spread the fire across the valley.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Georg Latzelberger, was destroyed in a forced-landing having been hit by both fighters and A.A. fire.
▪ He thought that they would stay there, the track giving them visibility and line of fire.
▪ It will not even perish by the flames of fire.
▪ The most commonly used pumps are submersible electric ones that pump out water through what looks like a fire hose.
▪ The rebel musketry fire was pouring... upon our men, who were closing together and rallying under the attack.
▪ The three main mast tips suddenly spout fire casting an eerie glow over the ship.
▪ You got the fire way up high.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
again
▪ Suddenly, guns were fired again, and a group of pirates ran from the woods and on to the stockade.
▪ Filetti fired again, hitting Carson, who fell and slithered behind a table.
▪ He fired again, and felt the lesser kick which told him the ball had only lodged half-way down the barrel.
▪ Not only can he be fired again, but probably he will be fired again.
▪ If the first shot hits you can fire again, regardless of whether you wounded or killed with your first shot.
▪ Not only can he be fired again, but probably he will be fired again.
▪ If the first shot hits you can fire again.
▪ We fired again, taking deliberate aim, and were rather surprised that it was unnoticed.
back
▪ The Right-Ons fired back the unanswerable reply that meetings belonged to those who attended them.
▪ The relay team was firing back down into the division.
▪ Normally it was helpful, but this time, with the friendlies on the ground, they could not fire back.
▪ Some of the men were firing back, but blindly.
▪ Utterly out of control now, these could not even fire back, for their port-side cannon could not be brought to bear.
▪ As the outgunned enemy tried to fire back, our fire became less random.
off
▪ She said that, as the officer felt threatened, he pulled his gun and fired off a warning shot.
▪ As the group advanced on him, the constable fired off another shot, this time hitting Jones in the upper thigh.
▪ First thing next morning I was going to fire off a letter, I thought, when I heard something.
▪ After firing off a couple of jokes that bomb disastrously, he will ask for a volunteer from the audience.
▪ At one point, laughing, they fired off a couple of rounds, ricocheting the bullets against a wall.
▪ He took out his new gun and fired off a few shots at an ugly chimney on the roof.
on
▪ I don't think I was fired on once.
▪ The governor sent forty soldiers to fire on what he called the horribly and detestably blasphemous Gortonians.
▪ As they headed for the first aircraft they were fired on by a sentry.
▪ Private Morrison's boat was fired on when he ignored warning shots.
▪ There were reports of opposition supporters having been fired on in Tbilisi the following day.
up
▪ He fired up the gas logs to supplement the background heating and they sat on the Chesterfield.
▪ There were several enemy. 51-caliber machine guns firing up at us.
▪ My scurrilous expectations were fired up by a headline on a handout from the Commission.
▪ In one radio commercial, Scratchman rescues a kitten stranded in a tree by firing up a chainsaw.
▪ The centre engine started first and then the opposite pairs fired up at 300 millisecond intervals.
▪ I fired up the motor again and set off in that direction.
▪ A group of 16 Tucson-based jazz pros will fire up the Gaslight Theatre tonight.
■ NOUN
air
▪ Then the anti-aircraft guns opened up, firing into the air against an imagined air raid.
▪ Although they fired mainly in the air, at least five demonstrators were killed.
▪ Gunshots crackled as police fired bullets into the air.
▪ Thousands who joined the protest were beaten by the security forces, who fired into the air.
▪ His plan was to go to Scuttler Bay; fire shots into the air, and go home.
▪ One fired into the air and exploded on the ground half way to the booth.
ball
▪ Harte fired the ball into the bottom corner before heading for the corner flag to celebrate.
bullet
▪ He fired one more tap-loaded bullet, then ran back parallel to the road.
▪ I fired once and the bullet entered her temple at her hair line.
▪ The man fired a single bullet, and the decapitation of St Michael prevented him from suffering the same fate.
▪ The device, which used a shotgun modified to fire bullets, was concealed in a wooden box hidden among trees.
▪ A gun is known to fire bullets at precisely three hundred and thirty meters per second.
▪ The head gave a sudden twist and Jack fired two more bullets into it.
chief
▪ Yeltsin fired his deputy chief of staff, Alexander I.. Kazakov, on Friday.
▪ City laws therefore prevented the mayor from firing his chief.
coach
▪ General manager Kevin Towers fired pitching coach Dan Warthen yesterday.
▪ And the person having the biggest chuckle over it all is Pat Burns, fired as coach late last season.
▪ The ceremony was perhaps most meaningful for Hazzard, who was fired as coach in 1988.
▪ Colangelo, in fact, has never fired a coach just for losing.
cylinder
▪ The latter is a book in which the author is firing on all cylinders.
▪ This company is firing on all cylinders.
▪ Your Reticular Activating System is firing on all cylinders, your cortex is turning somersaults.
employee
▪ It suits the firm which has cut costs by firing regular employees and putting out work to people like her.
▪ It is expensive and difficult to fire employees.
▪ It has fired more employees, at a stroke, than at any time in its 114-year history.
▪ Nor had the courts outlawed most patronage hiring and firing and protected most employees from wrongful discharge.
▪ He insisted on the trustees' support and told them he wanted to fire some employees.
▪ The White House subsequently apologized to most of the fired employees, arranging new jobs for them.
▪ Adamson said he has fired employees and even canceled franchise agreements because of continued discriminatory practices.
engine
▪ Her car was having one of its bad days, and it was some twenty minutes before the engine fired successfully.
▪ Formerly there were glow-plugs which had to be warmed before the engine would fire.
▪ The engine fired and the gearbox was unaffected.
enthusiasm
▪ Yesterday had been the group's first taste of real sunshine and comparative warmth and it had fired their enthusiasm.
▪ I loved him, and he really fired my enthusiasm for history.
▪ Many of the adolescents are fired with an inherent enthusiasm for education that they seek still more when they attain their majority.
▪ There are live presentations, to fire the enthusiasm of the thousands of schoolchildren who visit every morning throughout the year.
▪ And our gallant lads, fired with the wild enthusiasm of the moment, madly push up the hill.
▪ I left the University fired with enthusiasm to go to live in Moscow to practise the language.
▪ It was not only her matching handbag and high-heeled shoes which fired my enthusiasm.
gas
▪ It offers good size accommodation, benefiting from three good bedrooms, two separate reception rooms and partial gas fired central heating.
▪ Other features include gas fired central heating.
▪ Situated in Church Road, Litherland, the property benefits from gas fired central heating and partial secondary glazing.
▪ National Power says because the station will be gas fired it's better for the environment.
▪ The house, which has gas fired central heating and double glazing, is situated in Ormskirk Road, Liverpool 9.
gun
▪ A gun is known to fire bullets at precisely three hundred and thirty meters per second.
▪ Then the anti-aircraft guns opened up, firing into the air against an imagined air raid.
▪ I went up Bald Hill, took out the gun, and fired four times.
▪ Those who did were swiftly cut down, peppered with birdshot, as they raised their guns to fire.
▪ He took out his new gun and fired off a few shots at an ugly chimney on the roof.
▪ She said that, as the officer felt threatened, he pulled his gun and fired off a warning shot.
▪ The best naval guns can fire a shell at about one kilometer per 148 second.
imagination
▪ Commercial speculation rather than the law fired his imagination.
▪ Her exceptional goodness in executing the humblest and most ordinary of tasks fired the imagination of Catholics everywhere.
▪ It could have been Hope's unknowing repudiation of the popular notion of black people which fired my imagination.
▪ The way it was taught did not exactly fire the imagination.
▪ No, the way to get at it is to work from whatever background has fired your imagination.
▪ Walt the Wonder Boy, the little lad who fired the imagination of millions.
▪ But two or three unusual features of last week's cut fired the imagination of New York's conspiracy theorists.
▪ Seeing those lofty settlements atop the sheer rocks fires the imagination.
job
▪ For his pains in defending Paisley, Boal was fired from his lucrative job as counsel to the Attorney-General.
▪ How do we work out the fact that a firing from one job can become an employment death sentence?
▪ As soon as they did, they were both fired from their jobs.
▪ A few weeks later I was fired from my job at Hunter College.
missile
▪ By one analysis, Saddam's forces have fired more missiles in the last year than in the previous nine.
mortar
▪ If the mortar has no crew at all it is unable to fire.
▪ Then Charlie started firing mortar rounds.
▪ The mortar shell explodes before it is fired.
▪ Now declare how far you want to fire the mortar shell.
▪ The rebels had held Makati since Saturday, firing mortars and machine guns at government troops ringing the district.
pistol
▪ Crouching, Yeremi contented himself with firing his bolt pistol at the athletically shifting targets.
▪ It had been a while since she'd fired a pistol and the initial retort took even her by surprise.
▪ You could fire a starting pistol next to some and they would barely look up.
▪ There was a crack, but no sepoy dropped dead; the percussion cap had fired but not the pistol.
▪ The policeman fired some pistol shots in the air, but there was no answer.
▪ Suddenly, Joyce fired his pistol and the battle had begun.
▪ He fired his pistol in the air and charged over the top as if he were chasing some errant fox.
police
▪ The police fired teargas in the central shopping district to disperse the rioters, creating panic among shoppers.
▪ It was then that the police fired tear gas.
▪ When the mob began burning the car and restaurant, the police fired a few warning shots, but to no avail.
▪ Several demonstrators were badly injured as police fired tear gas to disperse the crowd in Revolution Square last Saturday.
▪ Gunshots crackled as police fired bullets into the air.
▪ These were swiftly put down by a detachment of the newly established Armed Police firing tear gas into the crowds.
▪ On May 3, 1885, police fired into a crowd of strikers in Chicago, wounding many and killing four.
rifle
▪ The crew tried to drive it away, and one man fired a rifle at it.
▪ After dark, the gooks fired a recoilless rifle into the firebase.
▪ The other time I came near to being shot was in May, when nobody should have been firing a rifle.
▪ The man had been seen firing a rifle in his back garden and through his letter box.
▪ Their Arab legionnaires galloped behind, firing their rifles exuberantly into the sky like extras in a Beau Geste film.
rocket
▪ It had two lids which you closed once you were in, and instead of bullets, it fired rockets.
▪ Three hours later, to our puzzlement, a small fishing boat scurried up in our wake, firing red distress rockets.
▪ Spray the fountain, then fire a rocket at the Bowlarama.
▪ It was placed in an eccentric, high-inclination orbit around Venus by the firing of a small rocket engine.
▪ This is a bit like what happens when one fires a rocket upward from the surface of the earth.
▪ He fired a rocket into the middle of the clearing, and the blast broke the string.
▪ Whiston fire station officer Phil Brammeier blasted pranksters who fired a rocket firework through a letterbox in Scott Avenue.
▪ In 1935, Goddard fired two rockets to ranges of 1. 8 and 2. 6 miles.
round
▪ One of the tanks was firing beehive rounds point-blank.
▪ Gunmen fired more than 100 rounds into his black Chevrolet Suburban, killing him instantly.
▪ Just prior to our assault, they had fired 6, 000 rounds of artillery and bombed it all morning.
▪ The artillery began firing beehive rounds, which I had never seen before at minimum elevation.
▪ Then Charlie started firing mortar rounds.
▪ During an ambush we sprung near Hoc Mon, I remember firing 25 to 30 rounds as fast as I could.
salvo
▪ He ought to have waited to fire one really effective salvo at close range.
▪ Clinton fired the opening salvo last month when he included tax cuts in his proposed 1997 budget.
shell
▪ The army plans later to fit Challenger with a new gun operating at even higher pressure and firing an improved shell.
▪ The best naval guns can fire a shell at about one kilometer per 148 second.
▪ Now declare how far you want to fire the mortar shell.
▪ When it got to that distance, I just stuck up the M79 and fired off a shotgun shell.
▪ The preliminary bombardment was the heaviest so far mounted: over two weeks 3,100 guns fired some 471/2 million shells.
shot
▪ The episode had a happy ending: according to Fleutiaux not a shot was fired, nor a ransom paid.
▪ There was no indication the shots were fired at police, nor was there an explanation for the gunfire.
▪ The battling had to go on without many actual shots being fired.
▪ It has been used twice before to kill, and each time a single shot was fired.
▪ If you were spotted, a shot was fired directly over your head, and you then had to freeze and surrender.
▪ Harriet Shakespeare and the policemen had begun to creep closer, ready to run as soon as the first shot was fired.
▪ During his address, some shots were fired, two men were killed, and several wounded.
soldier
▪ One of these rules permits soldiers to fire on vehicles being driven directly at people.
▪ The governor sent forty soldiers to fire on what he called the horribly and detestably blasphemous Gortonians.
▪ At the beginning of the century the average well-trained soldier could fire about one round per minute.
▪ The soldiers refused to fire on the protestors.
▪ Mobs burned tyres in the streets, and the prudent stayed at home while soldiers drove around firing their weapons.
▪ Then, as always, the soldiers fire back at them.
▪ The boys from the bazaar hide on the target-range, watching the soldiers fire.
▪ A soldier saw it, fired at about seventy-five yards distance, and missed it.
weapon
▪ The weapon does not fire and can not be used again for the rest of the game.
▪ The wounds were caused by a. 22 caliber weapon fired from behind the victims, who were kneeling.
▪ She raised her weapon to fire at the door.
worker
▪ Bigger Silicon Valley firms have also been firing workers.
▪ Flexibility for employers means new chances to save money and to fire unwanted workers.
▪ Since the arrests, the company has fired one worker and suspended three others, Maher said.
■ VERB
begin
▪ Stephen climbed on top of the pile of earth and began to fire into the gloom.
▪ The young man took the seat behind the cold metal desk and began to fire questions at me.
▪ Two other boats approached, fore and aft, and began firing fireworks at the vessel.
▪ I picked out a branch and began firing at it.
▪ He was walking with his mum in Chicago when two men in a car began firing at three others.
▪ The artillery began firing beehive rounds, which I had never seen before at minimum elevation.
▪ As the situation worsened more border police entered the area and began firing live ammunition into the crowd.
▪ As the tension mounted, Mr Newhouse himself began firing people with little warning.
hire
▪ You can also hire and fire physios, trainers and scouts.
▪ There are professional managers who are hired and fired by the residents.
▪ Professor Cousins may be on his way out but he hadn't gone yet and still had hiring and firing power.
▪ My father got hired and fired a lot, usually en masse with entire coaching staffs.
▪ The board, composed of nine presidential appointees, has the power to hire and fire the postmaster general.
▪ Principals are now hired and fired based on merit rather than seniority.
▪ The Council at least has the power to hire and fire some key players beyond the manager.
start
▪ But nothing much has happened this year that suggests he is about to start firing.
▪ Other elements were further back, and they started firing.
▪ A man called John Salvi walked into the clinic and started firing.
▪ We were about a minute away from touchdown when the gunships started firing.
▪ The older woman had started to fire from the ravine.
▪ Then Charlie started firing mortar rounds.
▪ But nothing much has happened this year to suggest he is about to start firing.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(be) in the firing line
▪ And some sources believe the proposal for a £75m prison at Fazakerley is one option now in the firing line.
▪ Foreign tourists are also in the firing line.
▪ He put his old enemy, corporate power, in the firing line.
▪ Its application does put its exponents in the firing line of critical appraisal.
▪ Read in studio A family is living in the firing line of over-enthusiastic golfers because of a planning mistake.
▪ The Law Society too was in the firing line.
▪ Unveiled Benefits are also thought to be in the firing line.
▪ We're public figures and so therefore we know we're in the firing line.
a ball of fire
▪ A ball of fire he might be, but he'd made one big mistake!
▪ Douglas was a ball of fire all season.
▪ One witness described seeing a plume of moke and a ball of fire and then seeing a body on the road.
baptism of/by fire
▪ An as-yet-unproven system called J-STARS, getting its baptism of fire in the Gulf, illustrates the point.
▪ Beige popsters take a vicarious pride in the slow baptism of fire that their chosen genre and its protagonists underwent.
▪ Diana admits that she wasn't easy to handle during that baptism of fire.
▪ It had been a baptism by fire, but she had come through.
▪ It is almost impossible to see where events will lead but you are going through a baptism of fire.
▪ My baptism of fire had been with Leon Brittan who was Chief Secretary until the 1983 general election.
▪ This was our baptism of fire and we learned many lessons.
be firing/running on all cylinders
▪ The latter is a book in which the author is firing on all cylinders.
▪ This company is firing on all cylinders.
▪ Your Reticular Activating System is firing on all cylinders, your cortex is turning somersaults.
be in the firing line/in the line of fire
be shooting/firing blanks
field of fire
▪ Harry blundering into the field of fire.
▪ The best place for most artillery is on a hill commanding a wide field of fire with long clear lines of sight.
▪ The first is that it preserves a clear field of fire for my missile troops.
▪ We had a good field of fire all round in case the enemy came out of the sunken road or over the hedge.
▪ We had triple concertina wire set up, claymores, and tripwires, and we even cut some fields of fire.
fire/emergency drill
▪ After selecting a field he carried out his emergency drills and shut down the engine.
▪ And practise a family fire drill.
▪ Immediately fire drills were followed and the building vacated.
▪ It was sabotaged by an unforeseen fire drill.
▪ So back to the fire drill.
▪ The advantage of fire drill thinking is that it reminds you that the worst really can happen.
▪ The local primary school nearest the naval base, Barne Barton, has an annual nuclear emergency drill.
flash flood/fire
▪ A couple of years ago these lanes were far from peaceful when a flash flood swept through the area.
▪ He believes Ruess probably died in a flash flood or fell off a cliff.
▪ In the event of a flash flood, remember that you should immediately seek higher ground.
▪ Like the desert after a flash flood, Freshers' Fair is decorated by societies which bloom for just a day.
▪ Summer flash floods achieve little beyond destroying crops.
▪ The report warns of extreme events such as thunderstorms causing flash floods and intense meteorological depressions.
▪ Urgent talks after flash flood causes chaos.
friendly fire
▪ But what really hurts is the friendly fire.
▪ Few details were released of the precise circumstances of the friendly fire incidents which caused the casualties.
▪ One step forward.New hope for truth about the victims of friendly fire.
▪ Wednesday he re-introduced Kevin Pollak, injured and disfigured by friendly fire in the Gulf War.
get on/along like a house on fire
have several irons in the fire
out of the frying pan and into the fire
roaring fire
▪ A roaring fire was in the grate and the room was pleasantly warm.
▪ He was acutely aware of everything that had gone on in front of the then roaring fire.
▪ I built a roaring fire in the stove and baked some potatoes.
▪ The aristocrats would be the kindling for a roaring fire fueled by the fats of social exploitation.
set the Thames on fire
set the world on fire/alight
▪ And now we have Sliver which was the subject of much wrangling and hasn't exactly set the world on fire.
▪ But if Rhodes hasn't set the world on fire with his batting, he certainly has with his fielding.
▪ Either way, the speed and acceleration is not going to set the world on fire.
▪ It was a lovely accomplishment, of course, but nothing to set the world on fire with.
▪ None of the three papers was going to set the world on fire.
▪ The sonorities glow, and the whole thing is user-friendly without setting the world on fire.
streak of lightning/fire/light etc
▪ A streak of lightning split the sky.
▪ Sometimes there is hope, a streak of light, a blur on a piece of film.
▪ The three women were wreaking havoc with their guns that fired streaks of light.
▪ There was another streak of lightning overhead.
the fat is in the fire
there's no smoke without fire
▪ And if you believe there's no smoke without fire, Sean Young must be a towering inferno.
▪ But there's no smoke without fire.
wall of fire/water etc
▪ A wall of water a thousand feet high smashed down on Nagarythe.
▪ A few minutes later, a wall of water crashed over the lip of the Falls and Niagara was in business again.
▪ And they drove off into another amazing wall of water.
▪ But there was no wall of water crashing through the canyon.
▪ I watched as the roof of the house seemed to rest on the four walls of fire.
▪ Spray, driven by the wall of water, struck his face.
▪ Surrounding buildings had to be protected by a wall of water to stop them being engulfed by the flames.
▪ They had been through the wall of fire together.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ As soon as we crossed the border, enemy troops started firing at us.
▪ He regained his balance, took aim, and fired.
▪ He was just impossible to work with, and in the end they fired him.
▪ Kendrick fired three shots at the President's car.
▪ Several shots were fired, but no one was injured.
▪ She was fired for serious professional misconduct.
▪ Suddenly the car stopped, and the passenger got out and fired a Kalashnikov rifle at the police car.
▪ The company fired a top executive for his role in improper financial dealings.
▪ The police fired into the air to make the crowd break up.
▪ When Max was fired from his job the whole family had to pack up and leave town.
▪ You're fired!
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As soldiers jumped out of the lorries, firing all around, helicopter gunships appeared overhead.
▪ Chapa was fired at the same time as Lozano.
▪ During the night the accused fired his air gun out of the window of his first-floor flat.
▪ He's getting ready to fire me, she thought.
▪ No shot is fired and no further shots may be fired that game - the gun is now useless.
▪ Not only can he be fired again, but probably he will be fired again.
▪ The system has previously undergone six months of preliminary tests in the same Redwood City neighborhood, with officers firing blanks.
▪ The two hapless groups of men now mostly hid, endured, and awaited their opportunity to fire back or escape.
Wikipedia

Fire (classical element)

Fire has been an important part of all cultures and religions from pre-history to modern day and was vital to the development of civilization. It has been regarded in many different contexts throughout history, but especially as a metaphysical constant of the world.

FIRE

FIRE may stand for:

  • Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, a civil liberties organization
  • Fully Integrated Robotised Engine, a model of engine produced by Fiat
  • Future Internet Research and Experimentation
  • Finnish Intelligence Research Establishment, a Finnish signals intelligence unit
  • FIRE economy, a segment of the stock market: Finance, Insurance, Real Estate
  • Fellowship of Independent Reformed Evangelicals, a network of Reformed Baptist churches

Fire (disambiguation)

Fire is the rapid oxidation of a material in the chemical process of combustion.

Fire may also refer to:

Fire (comics)

Fire is a fictional character, a comic book superheroine from the DC Comics universe. A version of her first appeared in Super Friends #25, (October 1979), and was created by E. Nelson Bridwell and Ramona Fradon. Her first appearance in mainstream DC Universe canon was Infinity, Inc. #32 (November 1986).

Fire (U2 song)

"Fire" is a song by Irish rock band U2. It is the fifth track on the band's 1981 album, October, and was released that year as the album's first single.

Fire (Image Comics)

Fire was originally a two-issue creator-owned comic book mini-series written and drawn by Brian Michael Bendis and published by Caliber Comics. It was later republished as a single volume by Image Comics.

Fire was among Bendis's first works to draw critical acclaim. Its success gave him a much wider audience and helped pave the way for A.K.A. Goldfish and Jinx.

Fire (Bruce Springsteen song)

"Fire" is a song written by Bruce Springsteen in 1977 which had its highest profile as a 1978 single release by The Pointer Sisters.

Fire (artscene group)

Fire, later known as Fire Graphics, was an underground computer artscene group that released ANSI, ASCII, and high resolution artwork from 1994 to 1998.

Fire (Ohio Players album)

Fire is the sixth studio album by the Ohio Players and the second released through the Mercury label.

Fire (Ferry Corsten song)

"Fire" by Ferry Corsten is a trance song that was released as a single in 2005, as well as appearing on Ferry Corsten's 2006 album L.E.F. It features vocals by Simon Le Bon (of the popular 80's band Duran Duran) from the 1990 song " Serious" by Duran Duran, which were re-recorded by Le Bon rather than sampled from the original song. A compilation of eight different remixes, also called "Fire", was released in 2006. The song received wide play throughout Europe through 2006 on commercial radio stations.

Fire (Kelis song)

Fire (band)

Fire was a late 1960s/early 1970s band that consisted of Dave Lambert (who later joined Strawbs), Bob Voice and Dick Duffall (Paul Brett Sage). Brett himself joined them for their now classic Magic Shoemaker LP recorded at Pye Studios London, in 1970. This vinyl LP has been in the UK's top 10 of collectable vinyl, being listed in Millers Antique Collectable guide. A 2008 archival release, The Magic Shoemaker Live, features live recordings of the original Fire line up, plus Paul Brett and Dave Cousins ( Strawbs), with Ray Hammond as the narrator.

Fire (instant messaging client)

Fire is an instant messaging client for Mac OS X (previously for OPENSTEP), that can access IRC, XMPP, AIM, ICQ, Microsoft, Yahoo!, and Bonjour. All services are built on GPL’d libraries, including firetalk, libfaim, libicq2000, libmsn, XMPP, and libyahoo2. Fire supports OS X v10.1 and higher.

The latest version of Fire is 1.5.6. The program is released under the GNU General Public License.

On 2007-02-23, it was announced that there would be no future versions of Fire released. The official Fire website stated there were several reasons, the biggest being the loss of developers, followed by the fact that most of the libraries used by Fire are no longer in active development. Two of Fire's developers joined the Adium team and wrote a transition path for users to move from Fire to Adium. The announcement recommended Adium for future IM needs.

Fire (Electric Six album)

Fire is the debut album of Electric Six, released in 2003. The album received generally positive critical reviews. Rolling Stone called the album "the summer's most brilliantly demented party record" and Blender hailed the music as "convincingly ferocious". Three singles were released from the album: " Danger! High Voltage", which reached #10 in the U.S. Billboard Hot Dance Music/Maxi-Singles Sales chart and #2 in the UK Singles Chart; " Gay Bar", which reached #5 in the UK Singles Chart; and " Dance Commander", which reached #40 in the UK Singles Chart. Fire went gold in the United Kingdom on September 5, 2003. Later that year, the album was re-released with a bonus DVD containing the music videos for all three singles from the album.

Fire (1996 film)

Fire is a 1996 Indian-Canadian romantic drama film written and directed by Deepa Mehta and starring Shabana Azmi and Nandita Das. It is the first installment of Mehta's Elements trilogy; it is succeeded by Earth (1998) and Water (2005).

The film is loosely based on Ismat Chughtai's 1942 story, Lihaaf (The Quilt). It was one of the first mainstream films in India to explicitly show homosexual relations. After its 1998 release in India, certain groups staged several protests, setting off a flurry of public dialogue around issues such as homosexuality and freedom of speech.

Fire (The Jimi Hendrix Experience song)

"Fire" is a song written by Jimi Hendrix and recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience in early 1967. It has been described as "an exercise in soul, psychedelic rock, and polyrhythmic jazz-inspired drumming" by AllMusic critic Matthew Greenwald. The song was remixed in stereo for the American release of the album. In 1969, it was released as a stereo single in the UK with the title "Let Me Light Your Fire". One of Hendrix's most popular songs, he frequently played it in concert. Several live recordings have been released and the original song is included on numerous Hendrix compilations, such as Smash Hits, Experience Hendrix: The Best of Jimi Hendrix, Voodoo Child: The Jimi Hendrix Collection, and Fire: The Jimi Hendrix Collection.

Fire (TV series)

Following the cessation of support for the original series by QLD Fire Services, The Royal Australian Air Force Fire Training School provided practical fire ground training for the crew of the next series featuring Totty Goldsmith and Andy Anderson. The then Commanding Officer was highly impressed with their application, and their desire to "Get into the role". Fire fighting aside, Andy Anderson's role in the series was to assume Command on promotion and the Air Force provided him with advice as to how that was managed.

Fire is an Australian television series transmitted on the Seven Network between 1995 and 1996. It was shown in the UK & Ireland on Sky One. In 1999 and 2000, the series was shown on Channel 5.

The series explored the lives of a platoon of firefighters. The leading cast members included: Andy Anderson, Georgie Parker, Peter Phelps, Shane Connor, Deborra-Lee Furness, Danny Adcock, Wayne Pygram, Tottie Goldsmith, Liddy Clark, Aaron Jeffery, Tayler Kane and Max Phipps.

Fire (2002 film)

Fire is a Pakistani Urdu-language film which stars Meera, Reema, Nirma, Saud (actor) and Moammar Rana.

Fire (Necro song)

"Fire" is a song by American rapper Necro, released on October 24, 2003. It was the only single from the mixtape Brutality Part 1, released that year.

Fire (Wild Orchid album)

Fire was the third album by Wild Orchid, which was scheduled to be released on June 19, 2001. This was the group's final release with Ferguson, as well as their final release as a trio and with RCA Records.

Fire (Wu Xing)

In Chinese philosophy, fire is the prosper of the matter, or the matter's prosperity stage. Fire is the second phase of Wu Xing.

Fire is yang in character. Its motion is upward and its energy is expansive.

Fire is associated with Summer, the South, the planet Mars, the colour red (associated with extreme luck), hot weather, daylight, and the Vermilion Bird (Zhu Que) in the Four Symbols (which is associated with a red phoenix in Western culture).

Fire (The X-Files)

"Fire" is the twelfth episode of the first season of the American science fiction television series The X-Files. It premiered on the Fox network on December 17, 1993. It was written by series creator Chris Carter, directed by Larry Shaw and featured guest appearances by Mark Sheppard and Amanda Pays. The episode is a "Monster-of-the-Week" story, unconnected to the series' wider mythology. "Fire" earned a Nielsen household rating of 6.8, being watched by 6.4 million households in its initial broadcast; and received mostly positive reviews from critics.

The show centers on FBI special agents Fox Mulder ( David Duchovny) and Dana Scully ( Gillian Anderson) who work on cases linked to the paranormal, called X-Files. In this episode, Mulder and Scully are visited by a Metropolitan Police detective who studied at Oxford University with Mulder; and who enlists their aid with a case involving a serial killer capable of pyrokinesis.

Due to its nature, the episode featured many dangerous stunts utilizing fire. In the scene where Mulder and L'Ively confront each other at either end of a corridor in the Marsden family home, and L'Ively sets fire to the entire hallway, Mark Sheppard, who played L'Ively, ducked out of the shot in order to protect himself from the intense heat. The only injury involved in the production was when David Duchovny burned his hand, leaving a small permanent scar. The character of Phoebe Green was considered as a recurring role, but this episode ended up being her only appearance.

Fire (Arthur Brown song)

"Fire" is a 1968 song written by Arthur Brown, Vincent Crane, Mike Finesilver, and Peter Ker. Performed by The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, it was released as a single and on the band's debut album, also called The Crazy World of Arthur Brown. The single reached no.1 in the UK (in August 1968) and in Canada. In October, it reached no.2 in the US Billboard charts and no.19 in Australia. It also got to no.3 in Germany, no.4 in France, no.6 in the Netherlands, no.7 in Austria, no.8 in Ireland, and no.18 in Finland. "Fire" sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.

The song is an example of the psychedelic rock of the period, though its lack of guitars or bass guitar distinguished it from many of its contemporaries. The lead instrument in this case was Vincent Crane's Hammond organ, augmented by an orchestral section featuring prominent brass. The singer's opening proclamation of himself as "the god of hellfire" became a lasting catchphrase. The song ends with the sound of a wind from hell.

During live performances and in the black and white promotional television clip, Brown performed the song wearing a burning helmet. The helmet was improvised with a leather skull cap onto which was bolted a metal dish that held lighter fluid or petrol. As the cap was not insulated, the heat from the burning fuel quickly conducted through the fixing bolt to the top of Brown's head, causing him considerable pain.

Two studio mixes of "Fire" have been officially released, one in stereo and one in mono. The mono mix features no brass. Both versions are included on the CD reissue of The Crazy World of Arthur Brown. The single B-side, "Rest Cure", was another track from the album.

Credit for the composition of "Fire" on the original vinyl single was to Arthur Brown and Vincent Crane only; however, Mike Finesilver and Peter Ker successfully sued for co-credit and royalties based on melodic similarities to their song "Baby, You're a Long Way Behind".

In Ronnie Wood's radioshow of 14 November 2011, both Wood and Alice Cooper claim that the bass is performed by Ron Wood, but Polly Marshall's biography of Arthur Brown states that "According to the-faces.com, Ronnie claims he played on the Track Records studio sessions recording Fire, but he must have confused it with the BBC session [of 8 April 1968]." There is no bass guitar on the recording, only bass pedals.

Fire (2NE1 song)

"Fire" is the debut single by South Korean girl group 2NE1. Released in May 2009, the song became a hit in all Korean charts. The song gained an instant huge success in South Korea and topped all on- and offline charts.

Fire (Rodgers novel)

Fire is an apocalyptic science fiction/horror novel by Alan Rodgers, published in 1990 as an original paperback from Bantam Books. It was reprinted by specialty publisher Wildside Press in 2000.

Fire (wrestler)

Vicente Serrano (born 1973) is a Mexican luchador, or professional wrestler, best known under the ring name "Fire", a Mini-Estrella, or "Mini". Since his debut in 1992 Serrano has worked mainly for Consejo Mundial de Lucha Libre (CMLL), in their Minis division, having held the CMLL World Mini-Estrella Championship in 1995/1996. Serrano has previously worked as Mascarita Mágica ( Spanish for "Little Magic Mask"), a miniature version of the original Máscara Mágica.

Fire (Krystal Meyers song)

"Fire" is the 3rd single off the album " Krystal Meyers", by Krystal Meyers. Fire peaked at No. 9 on the Christian Rock Charts.

Fire (Cashore novel)

Fire is a fantasy novel by Kristin Cashore, a companion book to her debut novel, Graceling. It tells the story of a young monster in the shape of a human who is hated because of her difference and supernatural abilities. The novel debuted at number four on The New York Times Best Seller list and won several awards.

Fire (Ohio Players song)

"Fire" is a hit song by R&B/funk band Ohio Players. The song was the opening track from the album of the same name and hit #1 on both the Billboard Hot 100 (where it was succeeded by Linda Ronstadt's " You're No Good") and the Hot Soul Singles chart in early 1975. It spent five weeks atop the soul chart. "Fire" was the Ohio Players' only entry on the new disco/dance chart, where it peaked at #10. The tune is considered to be the band's signature song along with " Love Rollercoaster."

The song was recorded at Mercury Records' Chicago-based studio. While performing it in California, the band let Stevie Wonder hear the basic track for the song and he predicted that it would become a big hit. The song is noted for its sound of a siren recorded from a fire truck, heard at the beginning, as well as in the instrumental break in the middle. The edit version avoided much of the repetition of the music.

A cover of the song was released by Canadian New Wave band Platinum Blonde on their third album Contact in 1987. Another cover, also from 1987, is featured on the album Rhythm Killers by Sly and Robbie, produced by Bill Laswell. For their 2014 album For the Love of Money, industrial hip hop outfit Tackhead covered the song.

It is currently used as the theme song to the FOX reality series Hell's Kitchen.

The guitar solo break was frequently used as an outro from the Top Ten segment by The CBS Orchestra on Late Show with David Letterman, with the song's ending added during presentation of the Top Ten on Letterman's final show in 2015. It was also sampled for Da Lench Mob's rap "You and Your Heroes" from Guerillas in tha Mist, and was referenced in the song "Sweet Revenge" by the Japanese pop group Dreams Come True.

The composer of Wild Cherry's hit song " Play That Funky Music" has indicated that "Fire" was the inspiration.

Fire (musical)

Fire is a 1985 Dora Award winning musical by Paul Ledoux and David Young. The musical is based loosely on the story of Jerry Lee Lewis and his cousin Jimmy Swaggart and the divergent paths their lives took.

The musical follows the lives of the character "Cale Blackwell", based on real-life story of Jerry Lee Lewis and his brother "Herchel Blackwell" which is based on Lewis' real-life cousin Jimmy Swaggart. Herchel follows in the footsteps of his father, the reverend Blackwell's, as a preacher. Herchel's father is proud of him but does not approve of his son's use of the radio and then television while pioneering televangelism. The Reverend JD Blackwell is almost immediately disappointed with Cale who quickly finds fame as a Boogie-Woogie star and wallows in an accompanying life of rebellion against society and his own upbringing. Both brothers fall in love with their mutual childhood sweetheart "Molly King".

Ultimately neither brother can claim to have led a moral life, and both had succumbed to their own flaws.

Fire (Yes, Yes Y'all)

"Fire (Yes, Yes Y'all)" (simply known as "Fire") is a song by American rapper Joe Budden, featuring Busta Rhymes. Produced by Just Blaze, the song is the second single from Budden's 2003 eponymous debut album.

The song was featured during the party scene in the movie Mean Girls. It was also featured in the pool scene of the pilot episode of Entourage. Joe Budden had made a remix with Paul Cain and Fabolous which appeared on the latter's mixtape, "More Street Dreams, Pt. 2: The Mixtape".

Fire (Swedish hardrock band)

Fire was a Swedish hard rock band from the Uppsala region, active 1980-1989. For a number of years FIRE dominated the music scene in their native Björklinge north of Uppsala.

The band members were Robert Larsson (bass), Niklas Jonsson (drums), Örjan Englund (keyboard), and Robert Dahlin (guitar). During the early years they only wrote songs in Swedish of which the legendary Ungdomen ("Youth") and Fånge nummer 31 ("Prisoner number 31") are perhaps the best known. In the early 80s, they started to write songs in English and had a local radio hit with the catchy tune You're not a soldier. When Lolita Pop visited Björklinge in 1984, FIRE was the opening act.

All band members contributed with song writing although most of their Swedish song were written by Jonsson and Dahlin, while most of their English songs were written by Dahlin with the occasional contribution by Jonsson/Englund.

Fire (magazine)

The Belgian- Francophone magazine AMI (Armes-Militaria-Informations-Tir) was first published in 1979. It published articles about firearms and militaria.

It became ArMI in 1987, then Fire in 1990. The magazine Fire, owned by the mercenaries Bob Denard and Christian Tavernier, was discontinued in 2002.

These magazines were sold at newsstands in Belgium, France and Switzerland.

FIRE (Maltese band)

FIRE is a rock band from Malta. Founded in 1998, the band's line-up includes vocalist Kenneth Calleja, guitarists Joe Vella and Robert Longo, bassist Trevor Catania and drummer Robert Spiteri. The band has released three albums, which have received favorable reviews.

Fire (Lacuna Coil song)

"Fire" is a song from Lacuna Coil's sixth studio album Dark Adrenaline.

Fire (Elfgren and Strandberg novel)

Fire is the second part of the Engelsfors trilogy by Mats Strandberg and Sara Bergmark Elfgren and the sequel to Cirkeln. It takes place about 10 weeks after the events of the first novel. It follows the same fantasy like the first and further develops themes of horror fiction, psychological realism and an unreliable narrator(s). The plot also makes analogies to the effects of global warming on Sweden's subarctic climate and the group behaviour dynamics of political, religious and ideological extremist groups.

Fire (Kasabian song)

"Fire" is a song by English rock band Kasabian and is the lead single from their third album West Ryder Pauper Lunatic Asylum. It was released 1 June 2009. On the week of its release it debuted at #3 in the UK Singles chart, making it their first UK Top 3 entry and their highest charting single to date as well as their fourth UK Top 10 single. It debuted at #44 in the Australian ARIA Singles Chart and has so far peaked #41.

The song featured in Callaway's 2010 Super Bowl commercial. The song is the official song of the Premier League from the 2010-11 season up to the 2012-13 season. This meant the song (different segments of it) was present in most of the BPL Shows produced by Premier League Productions which was broadcast around the world. A purported remix of the song is still currently the theme tune of Kick Off, the show produced by PL Productions before the main Matchday Live coverage. The song is also currently used by the band's home town team, Leicester City as goal music. It is also featured in the F1 2010 video game.

In October 2011, NME placed it at number 65 on its list "150 Best Tracks of the Past 15 Years".

Fire (Shinee song)

Fire is the seventh Japanese single by South Korean boy group Shinee. The single was released on March 13, 2013, as their last release under EMI Music Japan. On April 4, 2013, EMI revealed that "Fire" will be the ending song for the channel TBS TV show, "Matsuko no shiranai sekai (The world that is unknown to Matsuko)", starting from April 19 (Friday) 0:45~ that airs 1 hour special episode.

Fire (Big Sean song)

"Fire" is a song by American recording artist Big Sean from his second studio album Hall of Fame (2013). It was released on August 20, 2013 by GOOD Music and Def Jam Recordings as the fourth single from the record. It was written and produced by Darhyl Camper Jr. and Rob Kinelski of Cocaine 80s, with additional songwriting provided by Big Sean and Alexander Izquierdo of The Monsters and the Strangerz. "Fire" is a hip hop song that lyrically describes the perseverance to overcome personal difficulties.

"Fire" received generally favorable reviews from music critics, who compared it the catalogs of fellow rappers Kanye West and Jay-Z, and recognized it as a standout track from Hall of Fame. The song peaked at number 19 on the U.S. Billboard Bubbling Under Hot 100 Singles component chart to the Billboard Hot 100, and reached number 46 on the Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. An accompanying music video was premiered through Vevo on August 2, 2013, and featured American recording artist Miley Cyrus; critics primarily focused on the continuation of the increasingly provocative image she established earlier in the year.

Fire (Part 1)

"Fire" (Part 1) is the season premiere of the fourth season of the American police drama television series Homicide: Life on the Street. It originally aired on NBC on October 20, 1995. The episode was written by Julie Martin (from a story by Tom Fontana and Henry Bromell) and was directed by Tim Hunter. The two-part story centres on Pembleton and Bayliss' investigation into a pair of arson-related homicides, and introduces a new regular character, Arson Squad detective Mike Kellerman (played by Reed Diamond), who subsequently transfers to Homicide and partners with Det. Meldrick Lewis. This episode also flagged the permanent departure of regular characters Henry Bolander ( Ned Beatty) and Beau Felton ( Daniel Baldwin).

Fire (Part 2)

"Fire (Part 2)" is the second, concluding part of the two-part season premiere of the fourth season of the American police drama television series Homicide: Life on the Street. It originally aired on NBC on October 27, 1995. Both parts were written by Julie Martin (from a story by Tom Fontana and Henry Bromell); Part 1 was directed by Tim Hunter, and Part 2 by Nick Gomez. This episode concludes the investigation of a pair of arson-related homicides, led by detectives Pembleton and Bayliss, with their Arson Squad colleague Det. Mike Kellerman.

Fire (Dead by Sunrise song)

"Fire" is a song by American rock band Dead by Sunrise, which consists of Linkin Park lead singer Chester Bennington, as well as the band members of Julien-K. It is the third single of their debut album, Out of Ashes. It was released to the iTunes Store on December 4, 2009 in Australia and June 30, 2010 in Japan.

Fire (Autumn Hill song)

"Fire" is a song recorded by Canadian country music duo Autumn Hill for their debut studio album, Favourite Mistake (2013). The song was written by Tareya Green of Autumn Hill, Jamie Appleby, and Alyssa Reid. It was released through Wax Records as the third single from the album on August 20, 2013. "Fire" topped the Canadian Country Singles Sales Chart for the week ending August 28, 2013.

Fire (Michelle Williams song)

'' "Fire" is a song recorded by American recording artist Michelle Williams. It serves as the second single from her fourth album Journey to Freedom.

Fire (Hedningarna album)

Fire'' (stylized "fiRe''") is the fifth album released by Swedish group Hedningarna, translated to "The Heathens" for the international market. It is a compilation album put together to introduce the group outside Sweden, containing tracks from the albums Kaksi! and Tra.

Fire (Tessanne Chin song)

"Fire" is a single released by Jamaican recording artist Tessanne Chin under Justice League Music on May 5, 2015. "Fire" is Chin's first single released under Justice League Music.

Fire (Markus Feehily album)

Fire is the debut solo studio album by Irish singer-songwriter and former Westlife vocalist Markus Feehily. The album was released on October 16, 2015, via Harmoney Entertainment, as part of the Kobalt Music Group. The album includes the singles "Love is a Drug" and "Butterfly".

Wiktionary

fire

n. 1 (context uncountable English) A (usually self-sustaining) chemical reaction involving the bonding of oxygen with carbon or other fuel, with the production of heat and the presence of flame or smolder. 2 (context countable English) Something that has produced or is capable of producing this chemical reaction, such as a campfire. vb. 1 (lb en transitive) To set (something) on fire. 2 (lb en transitive) To heat without setting on fire, as ceramic, metal objects, etc. 3 (lb en transitive) To drive away by setting a fire. 4 (lb en transitive) To terminate the employment contract of (an employee), especially for cause (such as misconduct or poor performance). 5 (lb en transitive) To shoot (a device that launches a projectile or a pulse of stream of something). 6 (lb en intransitive) To shoot a gun, a cannon or a similar weapon. 7 (lb en transitive sports) To shoot; to attempt to score a goal.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

fire

c.1200, furen, "arouse, enflame, excite" (a figurative use); literal sense of "set fire to" is attested from late 14c., from fire (n.). The Old English verb fyrian "to supply with fire" apparently did not survive into Middle English. Related: Fired; firing.\n

\nMeaning "expose to the effects of heat or fire" (of bricks, pottery, etc.) is from 1660s. Meaning "to discharge artillery or a firearm" (originally by application of fire) is from 1520s; extended sense of "to throw (as a missile)" is from 1580s. Fire away in the figurative sense of "go ahead" is from 1775.\n

\nThe sense of "sack, dismiss from employment" is recorded by 1885 (with out; 1887 alone) in American English. This probably is a play on the two meanings of discharge (v.): "to dismiss from a position," and "to fire a gun," influenced by the earlier general sense "throw (someone) out" of some place (1871). To fire out "drive out by or as if by fire" (1520s) is in Shakespeare and Chapman. Fired up "angry" is from 1824 (to fire up "become angry" is from 1798).\n

fire

Old English fyr "fire, a fire," from Proto-Germanic *fur-i- (cognates: Old Saxon fiur, Old Frisian fiur, Old Norse fürr, Middle Dutch and Dutch vuur, Old High German fiur, German Feuer "fire"), from PIE *perjos, from root *paəwr- (cognates: Armenian hur "fire, torch," Czech pyr "hot ashes," Greek pyr, Umbrian pir, Sanskrit pu, Hittite pahhur "fire").\n

\nCurrent spelling is attested as early as 1200, but did not fully displace Middle English fier (preserved in fiery) until c.1600.\n

\nPIE apparently had two roots for fire: *paewr- and *egni- (source of Latin ignis). The former was "inanimate," referring to fire as a substance, and the latter was "animate," referring to it as a living force (compare water (n.1)).\n\nBrend child fuir fordredeþ

["The Proverbs of Hendyng," c.1250]

\nEnglish fire was applied to "ardent, burning" passions or feelings from mid-14c. Meaning "discharge of firearms, action of guns, etc." is from 1580s. To be on fire is from c.1500 (in fire attested from c.1400, as is on a flame "on fire"). To play with fire in the figurative sense "risk disaster, meddle carelessly or ignorantly with a dangerous matter" is by 1861, from the common warning to children. Phrase where's the fire?, said to one in an obvious hurry, is by 1917, American English.\n

\nFire-bell is from 1620s; fire-alarm as a self-acting, mechanical device is from 1808 as a theoretical creation; practical versions began to appear in the early 1830s. Fire-escape (n.) is from 1788 (the original so-called was a sort of rope-ladder disguised as a small settee); fire-extinguisher is from 1826. A fire-bucket (1580s) carries water to a fire. Fire-house is from 1899; fire-hall from 1867, fire-station from 1828. Fire company "men for managing a fire-engine" is from 1744, American English. Fire brigade "firefighters organized in a body in a particular place" is from 1838. Fire department, usually a branch of local government, is from 1805. Fire-chief is from 1877; fire-ranger from 1909.\n

\nSymbolic fire and the sword is by c.1600 (translating Latin flamma ferroque absumi); earlier yron and fyre (1560s), with suerd & flawme (mid-15c.), mid fure & mid here ("with fire and armed force"), c.1200. Fire-breathing is from 1590s. To set the river on fire, "accomplish something surprising or remarkable" (usually with a negative and said of one considered foolish or incompetent) is by 1830, often with the name of a river, varying according to locality, but the original is set the Thames on fire (1796). The hypothetical feat was mentioned as the type of something impossibly difficult by 1720; it circulated as a theoretical possibility under some current models of chemistry c.1792-95, which may have contributed to the rise of the expression.\n\n[A]mong other fanciful modes of demonstrating the practicability of conducting the gas wherever it might be required, he anchored a small boat in the stream about 50 yards from the shore, to which he conveyed a pipe, having the end turned up so as to rise above the water, and forcing the gas through the pipe, lighted it just above the surface, observing to his friends "that he had now set the river on fire."

["On the Origins and Progress of Gas-lighting," in "Repertory of Patent Inventions," vol. III, London, 1827]

WordNet

fire

  1. n. the event of something burning (often destructive); "they lost everything in the fire"

  2. the process of combustion of inflammable materials producing heat and light and (often) smoke; "fire was one of our ancestors' first discoveries" [syn: flame, flaming]

  3. the act of firing weapons or artillery at an enemy; "hold your fire until you can see the whites of their eyes"; "they retreated in the face of withering enemy fire" [syn: firing]

  4. a fireplace in which a fire is burning; "they sat by the fire and talked"

  5. intense adverse criticism; "Clinton directed his fire at the Republican Party"; "the government has come under attack"; "don't give me any flak" [syn: attack, flak, flack, blast]

  6. feelings of great warmth and intensity; "he spoke with great ardor" [syn: ardor, ardour, fervor, fervour, fervency, fervidness]

  7. once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles)

  8. a severe trial; "he went through fire and damnation"

fire

  1. v. start firing a weapon [syn: open fire]

  2. cause to go off; "fire a gun"; "fire a bullet" [syn: discharge]

  3. bake in a kiln so as to harden; "fire pottery"

  4. terminate the employment of; "The boss fired his secretary today"; "The company terminated 25% of its workers" [syn: give notice, can, dismiss, give the axe, send away, sack, force out, give the sack, terminate] [ant: hire]

  5. go off or discharge; "The gun fired" [syn: discharge, go off]

  6. drive out or away by or as if by fire; "The soldiers were fired"; "Surrender fires the cold skepticism"

  7. call forth (emotions, feelings, and responses); "arouse pity"; "raise a smile"; "evoke sympathy" [syn: arouse, elicit, enkindle, kindle, evoke, raise, provoke]

  8. destroy by fire; "They burned the house and his diaries" [syn: burn, burn down]

  9. provide with fuel; "Oil fires the furnace" [syn: fuel]

The Collaborative International Dictionary

fire

Command \Com*mand"\, n.

  1. An authoritative order requiring obedience; a mandate; an injunction.

    Awaiting what command their mighty chief Had to impose.
    --Milton.

  2. The possession or exercise of authority.

    Command and force may often create, but can never cure, an aversion.
    --Locke.

  3. Authority; power or right of control; leadership; as, the forces under his command.

  4. Power to dominate, command, or overlook by means of position; scope of vision; survey.

    The steepy stand Which overlooks the vale with wide command.
    --Dryden.

  5. Control; power over something; sway; influence; as, to have command over one's temper or voice; the fort has command of the bridge.

    He assumed an absolute command over his readers.
    --Dryden.

  6. A body of troops, or any naval or military force or post, or the whole territory under the authority or control of a particular officer.

    Word of command (Mil.), a word or phrase of definite and established meaning, used in directing the movements of soldiers; as, aim; fire; shoulder arms, etc.

    Syn: Control; sway; power; authority; rule; dominion; sovereignty; mandate; order; injunction; charge; behest. See Direction.

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "fire".

Tane and Asara were firing on the first Aberrant creature, trying to dissuade it from the panicking manxthwa, but it held fast.

Chemical rockets in the nose fired to slow it, dirty ablation smoke was pouring out of all ninety-six brake drums.

These protected the main bodies by a process of ablation so that to the opposition each man appeared to flare up under fire like a living torch.

He did manage to use his fire magic on a few of them, setting their shirts and hair ablaze, and that forced the rest to reconsider their attack for a time.

Even the news that the Yorktown, after quelling the fires and resuming fleet speed, had been torpedoed in a second attack, was again ablaze and listing, and might be abandoned, could be taken in stride.

O Queen Rabesqurat, the haven of our voyage was Aklis, and we feared delay, seeing the fire of the mountain ablaze with expectations of us.

So they abode there, and made a fire by the waterside, and watched there, turn and turn about, till it was broad day.

Not only was it exceptionally lofty, and on one flank of that series of bluffs which has before been mentioned as constituting the line upon which the Confederate grip of the stream was based, but the tortuous character of the channel gave particular facilities for an enfilading fire on vessels both before and after they came abreast the works.

To support these and concentrate from the earliest moment as effective a fire as possible upon the works, Farragut brought his ironclads inside of the wooden vessels, and abreast the four leaders of that column.

Coming abreast of each other, Harry held his fire, prepared to suffer the shots of the four-pounders.

A hogshead of ale was abroach under an oak, and a fire was blazing in an open space before the trees to roast the fat deer which the foresters brought.

Grounders never got used to the fact that in orbit, you decelerated by firing your rockets to move into a higher, slower orbit, and accelerated by using your retros to drop into a lower, faster orbit.

 Naxid missiles, Martinez realized, accelerated to relativistic velocities outside the system, then fired through the wormhole along the route they knew Chenforce had to take.

Three and a half days later the enemy raced past Zanshaa without firing a missile at Sula or anyone else, and accelerated on a path for the Vandrith gas giant.

Fire, the Acceptor of sacrifices, ravishing away from them their darkness, give the light.