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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

fight

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bitter fight/struggle
▪ The law was passed after a bitter fight that lasted nearly a decade.
a desperate struggle/battle/fight
▪ The climbers faced a desperate struggle to reach safety.
a fighting chance (=a small but real chance)
▪ The Republican Party has a fighting chance at the next election.
be fighting for your life (=be so ill or injured that you might die)
▪ One badly burned man was fighting for his life in hospital.
beat off/fight off competition
▪ She beat off competition from dozens of other candidates to get the job.
cock fight
combat/fight unemployment
▪ The government's first priority is to combat unemployment.
extreme fighting
fight a battle (also wage a battleformal)
▪ The police are fighting a tough battle against crime.
▪ Many areas around here are waging a constant battle against vandalism.
fight a blaze
▪ Nearly 80 firefighters fought the blaze for three hours on Sunday.
fight (a) disease (=try to stop it continuing)
▪ Some bacteria help the human body fight disease.
fight a fire (=try to make a fire stop burning)
▪ Further attempts to fight the fire were abandoned.
fight a war
▪ The two countries fought a brief war in 1995.
fight an electionBritish English (also contest an election British Englishformal) (= take part in it and try to win)
▪ Three independent candidates are also planning to contest the election.
fight for a cause (=take action to achieve an aim)
▪ Young people often want to fight for a cause.
fight for compensation (=try hard to get it)
▪ Alan, who hurt his back and hasn't worked since, is still fighting for compensation.
fight for equality
▪ Women fought for equality throughout the twentieth century.
fight in a war (=take part as a soldier)
▪ Her grandfather fought in the war.
fight the flab (=lose weight)
▪ simple advice to help you fight the flab
fight/choke/blink back tears (=try not to cry)
▪ She fought back tears yesterday as she re-lived the horrors she had seen.
fight/combat an infection
▪ A new drug is being developed to combat the infection.
fight/combat evil
▪ Joan swore to fight evil in all its forms.
fight/combat inflation
▪ An economic plan to combat inflation was drawn up.
fight/combat poverty (=take action to get rid of poverty)
▪ The money should be spent on fighting poverty.
fight/combat terrorism
▪ We will provide the necessary resources to combat terrorism.
fight/combat/tackle crime
▪ There are a number of ways in which the public can help the police to fight crime.
fight/gasp for air (=try to breathe with difficulty)
▪ He clutched his throat as he fought for air.
fighting fitBritish English (= very fit)
▪ I had just come back from holiday and was fighting fit.
fight/struggle for survival
▪ Many construction companies are fighting for survival.
fight/tackle corruption (=try to stop it)
▪ He criticized the government for failing to fight corruption in high places.
fire fight
fire fighting
fist fight
gasp/fight for breath (=have difficulty breathing)
▪ He was lying on the floor gasping for breath.
had...snowball fight
▪ We had a massive snowball fight.
hand-to-hand fighting/combat etc
▪ There was fierce hand-to-hand fighting in the streets of the city.
▪ They were defeated in hand-to-hand combat.
Heavy fighting
Heavy fighting was reported near the border.
prepare yourself for a race/fight etc
▪ The Chicago Bears are busy preparing themselves for the big game.
resist/fight/suppress an urge
▪ She had to resist a constant urge to look back over her shoulder.
sb’s fight/struggle/battle for survival
▪ Their lives had been one long struggle for survival.
start a fight/argument
▪ Oh, don’t go trying to start an argument.
the fight/war against terrorism
▪ ideas on how the international community can further the war against terrorism
the struggle/fight for equality
▪ the people who led the struggle for equality in the United States
the struggle/fight for freedom
▪ The student movement played an important role in the struggle for political freedom.
ultimate fighting
violence/fighting spreads
▪ There is no indication that the violence is likely to spread.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
back
▪ Playing an unusual opening variation, Yusupov secured some advantage, but with accurate play Karpov fought back.
▪ To fight back, PacBell has challenged the fairness of the bid process.
▪ They fought back as the enemy continued to bomb hangars and parked aircraft.
▪ But the business is fighting back, revamping betting shops, simplifying the pools coupons and advertising better odds.
▪ The parasites can fight back, with a range of eggs that mimic those of their chosen host.
▪ So you fight back the anxiety.
▪ Another 10 years down the track, though, and the magpies started to fight back.
▪ While she lay waiting, Elinor fought back the fears underscored by the hospital bed and the smell of antiseptic.
hard
▪ Belfast was one which fought hard and played great football.
▪ For years we fought hard against the police attitude not to treat this as a crime.
▪ I hoped to keep one of them alive for questioning, but they fought hard.
▪ The president fought hard for the plan, and saw it through Congress by mid-March.
▪ Cnut's men had fought hard, and doubtless expected to be remunerated accordingly.
▪ I fought hard for the right to be right.
▪ She fought hard to get him a part-time playgroup place in the group his older brother attended.
▪ She was fighting hard not to be unpleasant.
off
▪ There crawled into my mind one nasty little question that I'd been fighting off till now.
▪ But Nicole fought off his advances.
▪ Claridges and the Savoy had to fight off take-over bids with borrowed money.
▪ The athlete then fights off enemies with sword and pistol.
▪ Terry managed to fight off the man; if he hadn't, he reckons he wouldn't be alive today.
▪ We gasped for breath and fought off the pain, desperate not to lose.
▪ But others have been forced to take on heavy debts to fight off hostile bids.
▪ You also lose your ability to fight off diseases of various kinds.
on
▪ However, if the tooth is knocked out completely, little additional damage can be done by fighting on.
▪ We fought on through most of the night, and when first dawn broke, we were still fully engaged.
▪ This is a good quality in that we will fight on despite terrible injuries, Sir.
▪ Some lawmakers want to repeal that measure and order the Fed to focus solely on fighting inflation.
▪ She was also mistaken in declaring her intention to fight on immediately the result of the first ballot was known.
On the evening of 20 November the Prime Minister's swift decision to fight on plunged the Conservatives into almost total disarray.
▪ Nor is it clear how many ministers urged her to fight on - though at least two did.
■ NOUN
battle
▪ Muriel was disinclined to know what battle had been fought, on what ground, and how badly Lily had been hurt.
▪ Just another hill where they fought another battle.
▪ There were always new battles to fight, new obstacles to uproot, new heresies to stamp out.
▪ A major battle must be fought to get rid of it.
▪ On the forward slopes of this mountain, towards Monfalcone, terrible and bloody battles had been fought.
▪ With fewer material battles to fight, character, values and faith seem to have filled the vacuum.
▪ It recalls the unsuccessful battles fought in the early 1970s to prevent the limestone-quarrying operation that made the scar.
breath
▪ I will fight to my last breath.
▪ I wad tired of fighting for breath.
▪ The illness causes the sufferer to fight for every breath when they're having an attack.
▪ His face was set in a painful rictus, his chest heaving as he fought for breath.
▪ Half way up she paused, fighting for breath, suddenly struck by the enormity of what she was doing.
▪ Agnes leaned against the castle wall, which was streaming with water, and fought for breath.
▪ None of the usual muck one finds in the lungs when a man's fighting for his breath.
▪ Theda held her while she fought for breath, taking in great gasps of air.
campaign
▪ Mr Major, they said, had fought an appalling campaign and Mr Kinnock a superb one.
▪ He fought the 1987 election campaign.
▪ Labour in 1983 under Michael Foot fought a disastrous campaign.
▪ Nellist has fought an aggressive campaign on his Parliamentary record and flooded the area with leaflets - 20,000 distributed yesterday alone.
▪ Mr Kinnock fought a good campaign.
▪ Her father, Ron Smith fought a long campaign for the investigation to be heard in this country.
▪ Residents have fought a long campaign to stop some motorists using the roads as a race track.
▪ Rather they fight guerrilla campaigns, as befits their savagery, which are extremely difficult to subdue.
corner
▪ He had nobody back in Langley who would be willing to fight his corner.
▪ Jen fought her corner fiercely but Helen knew that she was winning.
▪ But each is fighting its national corner too.
▪ She always said he should have stayed to fight his corner.
▪ Sara Keays has continued to fight her corner.
death
▪ While not explicit, many implied that they would indeed fight to the death for their managing director.
▪ They say we massacred him, but he would have massacred us had we not defended ourselves and fought to the death.
▪ But death can only be fought with death, and life with life, he wrote.
▪ No, she fights her to the death, which from the point of view of the species is unhelpful.
▪ If the adventurers pursue the Harpies back to their lair, they will fight to the death to defend it.
▪ I fling them from my bed and in that moment resolve to fight back, vowing death to another species.
▪ He fights almost to the death rather than succumb.
▪ High Road has tackled all kinds of issues from pit bull terrier fighting to cot death in order to illuminate character.
election
▪ He fought the 1987 election campaign.
▪ The Conservative and Unionist party will fight the next general election as the party of the Union.
▪ Is not that a terrible record on which to fight a general election, in which the Government will be defeated?
▪ Twenty parties are registered to fight the election and some of the smaller ones are making a respectable showing.
▪ There was a time when the provisionals sought to ride both horses simultaneously, fighting elections and plotting murder.
▪ He unsuccessfully fought the next three elections.
▪ It seems important, therefore, to try to establish how the decision to fight the election came about.
fire
▪ Every member of the warehouse staff should be trained in the use of various portable fire fighting appliances installed within the premises.
▪ Then they would close up, go forward, receive the withering infantry fire, and fight as best they could.
▪ They make sure fire instructions are clearly displayed and that fire fighting equipment is in its correct place.
▪ The Lone fire is being fought with a lot more than just water.
▪ Height and restricted access are the most significant factors of the fire fighting problem.
▪ They are the victims of auto accidents, industrial accidents, falls from cliffs, fires, fights, stabbings, shootings.
▪ How could it be otherwise? Fire must fight fire, must it not?
▪ Well briefed guards with fire fighting appliances should be placed in the vicinity.
life
▪ As a result of this, the Bristol Centre is fighting for its life.
▪ She was fighting for her life with her entire body, kicking and biting and cursing.
▪ Medical campaigners say they're fighting for quality of life.
▪ I realized I was fighting for my life and defended myself.
▪ Mr Major and his Chancellor Norman Lamont were fighting for their political lives last night in the greatest crisis they have faced.
▪ Dole is a man who has fought his entire life to protect and advance his core beliefs.
▪ One day we may meet that villain, or the many like him, and have to fight for our very lives.
▪ But less than 6 months ago, she was fighting for her life.
man
▪ Many of the men who had actually fought got nothing.
▪ The Gulf War was a disaster for men and women fighting together on the same battlefield, he maintained.
▪ This man may have fought at Flodden but he is not King James.
▪ The dyed hair and dyed moustache are no longer Signs of a man wishing to fight the odds.
▪ The classic example of this is the girl who sets two men fighting for her.
▪ He was one against four - and already wounded - and yet he stood there deliberately inciting the men to fight.
▪ I prefer to believe that men who fought for the United States understand what they fought for and what others died for.
survival
▪ Now they are fighting for survival.
▪ Two years ago, he arrived battered, beaten and fighting for survival in the face of Republican victories in 1994.
▪ For two years Vlasov was limited to the depressing task of fighting for the very survival of his movement.
▪ This argument is that the inverse relationship is a result of desperate families fighting for survival from too small pieces of land.
▪ Mr Milosevic is fighting for his political survival after a vicious campaign tainted by intimidation and haunted by fears of electoral fraud.
▪ Time allowed 00:22 Read in studio Five puppies are fighting for survival after being left to die in a rubbish sack.
▪ Not even the farmers-right now fighting for their very survival-have escaped the scourge of the climate change levy.
▪ On the contrary, they saw their San Francisco elderly as fighting for survival and self-esteem through a remarkable variety of strategies.
tear
▪ It was still tender from the soldier's abuse, but the pain helped her fight back incipient tears.
▪ I find myself fighting back tears as I thank them for coming.
▪ Desperately she fought back the tears, not knowing why they had formed so swiftly.
▪ Shareef Abdur-Rahim fought back tears throughout his statement and parts of the question-and-answer period that followed.
▪ Breathing deeply, fighting sudden fresh tears, she stared at the whitewashed walls of the tiny, tidy yard.
▪ In fact, the chance to show Neely fighting back tears probably became an excuse to return to the topic.
▪ None of it registered, because she was fighting tears that were perilously near.
war
▪ For me the mystery of the enemy's identity had been increased by the peculiar sort of war I had fought.
▪ The Art Deco war fought with tanks and Rolls-Royces is another plus.
▪ Those camps weren't military targets, they didn't affect the way the war was being fought.
▪ The best way to fight against the threat of nuclear war is to fight for socialism through class-struggle means.
▪ The war for independence was fought on several fronts.
▪ His brother Menelaus was the husband of Helen, for whose sake the Trojan War was fought.
▪ At that point there will be a different air war to fight, for which crews must be kept fresh.
▪ The Civil War had been fought in the main in the borderlands, precisely where the national question was at its most urgent.
way
▪ Von Schönberg had had no need to fight his way up the ranks.
▪ Bar girls were screaming, and trying to fight their way past us.
▪ Then he had to fight his way out of her pages.
▪ At the very least, they could organize to fight the oppressive way in which science gets done.
▪ We will swim through seas of blood, fight our way through lakes of fire, if we are ordered.
▪ Bowman glanced back only once at Whitehead, as he fought his way out of the cubicle.
▪ After fighting his way through all this, he would have to face an angry and almost certainly stark-naked Quigley.
▪ Meanwhile, the master had sprung from his position backstage and was fighting his way toward me.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a fight to the finish
▪ It will be a fight to the finish.
▪ Six teams are bitter rivals in what will be a fight to the finish.
fight a rearguard action
▪ A rearguard action is being fought against the sale of the land for business development.
▪ With their captain and inspiration, Roy Aitken, suspended, Saints seemed to have come prepared to fight a rearguard action.
fight tooth and nail
▪ We had to fight tooth and nail to get the government to admit they were wrong.
▪ He fought tooth and nail for 15 months before going to sleep one final night last week.
▪ He would also fight tooth and nail to keep her from the likes of Tommy Allen.
▪ Legislation aimed at forcing the power firms to clean up their act is being fought tooth and nail by the polluters.
▪ They fought tooth and nail through an initial series of leagues and finished in seven knockout matches.
▪ They fought tooth and nail to protect the solicitors' monopoly of conveyancing but eventually compromised by not objecting to licensed conveyancers.
fight your corner/fight sb's corner
fight your own battles
▪ She has a talent for playing modern women who must find the inner strength to fight their own battles.
▪ Surely it is better for the townsfolk themselves to develop the necessary skills to fight their own battles?
▪ We invaded Ireland and fought our own battles there.
grudge fight/match
▪ None of the combatants in this grunge grudge match are over 20.
▪ Six other players were sin-binned as Britain beat New Zealand 3-2 in a grudge match.
have no stomach for a fight/task etc
▪ They proved to have no stomach for a fight with only Steve Regeling showing any semblance of spirit.
pillow fight
▪ Is it like a pillow fight with rock-hard chestnuts?
run/hurt/fight etc like hell
▪ I know he lost his legs first, and then his fingers-he died alone and it hurt like hell.
▪ I remember running like hell, knowing I was being pursued and looking back for Sarah, who didn't join me.
▪ I was able to breathe only with the utmost difficulty, and my arm hurt like hell.
▪ Must have fought like hell to find its niche within the forest, to distinguish itself within the pack.
▪ My forehead hurt like hell and my body was bruised all over, but no bones were broken.
▪ Run, North, run; just run like hell.
▪ Spring sauntered north, but he had to run like hell to keep it as his traveling companion.
▪ We fought like hell for most of the time.
three-cornered contest/fight
▪ Third, after a terrific three-cornered fight, were David Hoskins and David James.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Amnesty is an organization that fights against torture and injustice.
▪ As kids, we fought about everything, but now we're pretty good friends.
▪ Billy had been fighting with some kids from another school.
▪ Civil rights groups have vowed to fight the changes.
▪ Freedom of speech is something well worth fighting for.
▪ He said he'd fight anyone who tried to stop him entering.
▪ His grandfather fought on the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War.
▪ If you two don't stop fighting about what to watch I'm going to send you to your room.
▪ If you want the job, you'll have to fight for it.
▪ Kerry's parents are always fighting -- I'm not surprised she left home.
▪ Mandela fought to abolish white-only rule in South Africa.
▪ McCallum and Toney fought to a draw.
▪ Most of these young soldiers don't even know what they're fighting for.
▪ My grandfather fought in World War II.
▪ My mother and my grandmother fight all the time.
▪ Neil Phillips will now fight Adams for leadership of the party.
▪ Pancho Villa fought a battle near here.
▪ The Boers were fighting the British at this time.
▪ The children fought and pushed in line.
▪ The Prime Minister has decided to stay on to fight another election.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Adult gangs did fight, but not with innocent people or bystanders.
▪ As no man can serve two masters we had long been told no wise general tries to fight on two fronts.
▪ Burke, for one, is committed to fighting this social dis-ease.
▪ Conversely, if middle-class parents stay, if they stay and fight, they can turn things around.
▪ For a few minutes we fought wildly.
▪ He has even fought skeleton warriors with Jason and the Argonauts.
▪ I argued, I fought, but he wanted to believe that happiness was impossible; it gave him some strange consolation.
▪ Our fathers, our grandfathers fought for that.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ Then there was a big fight and she said I mustn't use them ever again.
▪ The Conservatives are putting up a big fight.
▪ The next morning they had their first big fight.
▪ Sometimes, however, notably during a General Election or a big fight, total inaccuracy is publicly punished.
▪ We had a big fight about a box of crackers.
▪ And with big fight tickets to sell, Frank isn't going to stand about silently while Lennox knocks his fight.
▪ Putting up the biggest fight is Gen.
bitter
▪ Passage of the 1994 law came after a bitter fight that lasted nearly a decade.
▪ The United States will continue to furnish you and your people with the fullest measure of support in this bitter fight.
good
▪ They likes a good fight in Bristol.
▪ I really like having a good fight with my wife, mornings when I have to go to work.
▪ I won't leave my kids without a bloody good fight.
▪ But our daughters and our sons may not see the fight we fought as the good fight.
▪ But assuming for the moment that we can do better than fight over the trough, how do we do it?
▪ These days he still carries on the good fight, primarily through his poignant, unadorned music.
▪ With the can and the bottle he fought the good fight, and kept himself from himself again.
▪ We had one good fight about Denver.
hard
▪ It was a long hard fight, but by now it was dark and this helped us very much.
▪ There was a long, hard fight, but when it finished, we and the ship were prisoners.
▪ You have learnt a lesson, fought a hard fight and are now ready to receive a valuable reward.
▪ It's undoubtedly the hardest fight Frank has had since his comeback.
▪ But the Tories are putting up a hard fight.
long
▪ That was the other thing, it took me a long fight to get my eye drops.
▪ Why do the hockey players skate around for so long between fights?
▪ It was a long hard fight, but by now it was dark and this helped us very much.
▪ Mancini, who died in 1994 after a long fight with cancer, is undergoing something of a rebirth.
▪ Naked heel's a long fight.
▪ After a long fight, the mystery monster turned out to be a 57-inch sturgeon that weighed 46 pounds.
▪ There was a long, hard fight, but when it finished, we and the ship were prisoners.
▪ After a long fight to beat inflation, the government does not feel sympathetic to these demands.
real
▪ Armed only with flesh-rending knives and magic Shurikens, the droids have a real fight on their hands.
▪ But the real fight was brewing in Washington.
▪ For the first time, Shirnette and me had a real fight, because of what I hated most.
▪ Each time Ted hit, he stepped back with his fists knotted, waiting for a real fight.
▪ The playgoers of London knew a real fight when they saw one.
▪ They can now afford to have a real bloody fight on that.
▪ The kid comes out hard, apparently wanting to make it a real fight.
▪ It wasn't a real fight and the blood wasn't real.
tough
▪ But it's being treated that way and a tough fight is promised.
▪ Harry Reid, face a tough fight on the Senate floor.
▪ Now he is facing his toughest fight yet - back to fitness after suffering a fractured fibula and damaged ankle ligaments.
▪ If champions are gauged by their ability to win tough fights, Marco Antonio Barrera has quite a future.
▪ Anyway, Unix now faces a much tougher fight for survival against Microsoft Corp - or are we imagining things?
▪ It was a very tough fight.
▪ Both the defenders and opponents of the Constitution girded for a tough fight.
■ NOUN
fist
▪ The rally broke up in fist fights and violence, and the whole thing spread on to the streets.
▪ Can you imagine knowing, and liking, a man who engages in fist fights?
▪ They can not get away from the characters as they have fist fights or shoot up.
▪ A fist fight followed, with much shouting and squabbling, until the ragged man succeeded in driving up to the door.
▪ While there, for whatever reason, he engaged himself in a fist fight with a man asking for money.
▪ One third said they had gotten into fist fights.
▪ Challenge them to a good old-fashioned fist fight?
▪ There was generally a fist fight in Hard Class after lunch, and Vassily provoked quarrels at every meal.
street
▪ John Candotti had once waded into a street fight simply because he thought the odds were too lopsided.
▪ Mob assaults upon blacks and street fights continued.
▪ Read in studio A murder suspect has told a court that he accidentally stabbed a teenager to death during a street fight.
▪ Two hundred and fifty stitches for street fight victim Prostite murder.
▪ Even before the last Albert Hall rally, Joyce and Mosley had joined the street fight.
title
▪ Why, they asked, should these associations collect such large fees for sanctioning a title fight?
▪ Sugar Ray Leonard won his world middle-weight title fight with Roberto Duran.
▪ The parade of the athletes to these press conferences was like the opening of a Marvin Hagler title fight.
▪ When he collapsed with brain damage during the world super-middleweight title fight he could so easily have died.
■ VERB
join
▪ Armoured figures drew their swords and shouted incoherently, joining the fight to the rear.
▪ I suppose they expected me to stop and join the fight.
▪ Police have renewed their appeal to the public to join the fight against horse attacks by reporting anything suspicious.
▪ I have to join the fight.
▪ The thought came to him in an instant as he stood, hesitating over whether to join the fight.
▪ Between ten and twenty other youths, said to be between eighteen and twenty years old, joined the fight.
▪ Read in studio Staff at one of the country's oldest breweries have joined the fight to keep it independent.
▪ His followers closed in, looking for an opening to join the fight and pin Bigwig down.
lose
▪ Read in studio A man severely brain damaged in an operation more than twenty-five years ago, has lost his fight for compensation.
▪ By and large, it was a losing and demoralizing fight.
▪ Gusinsky could lose everything in a fight with Putin.
▪ He usually lost his fights, but after he understood his nose, he never again bled to the vomit point.
▪ They lost their fight to prevent the war, but never their desire for peace.
▪ He may be losing in the fight for delegates.
▪ And there ... There, James ... There, my son, I lost the fight.
▪ At home and abroad, Mr Gorbachev has an awful lot to lose from a fight.
pick
▪ We adults do the same: we come home from work and start complaining or picking a fight.
▪ Had never picked a fight in his life.
▪ Barton Lynch's manager had once picked a fight with him.
▪ From a lack of communication, parents are more likely to misunderstand, blame, or pick fights with one another.
▪ Anthony Ryan was known in his family as able to pick a fight with his own fingernails.
▪ The first thing Vicious does is start picking fights with these guys who are supposed to protect him.
▪ You pick your side and fight for it.
▪ He loved to pick arguments and fights.
spoil
▪ It seemed to him that Vincent came home spoiling for a fight.
▪ She is an egocentric, angry, combative woman spoiling for a fight.
▪ Be that as it may, Cooper was spoiling for a fight, as this unpublished letter shows.
start
▪ They are more likely to start fights with other children, kill and be cruel to animals and have behaviour problems.
▪ I started learning on my own, and we started getting into fights about things.
▪ He'd never started a fight in his life.
▪ One Saturday a couple of young punks decided to start a fight with my father.
▪ No one in his right mind would want to start a fight in such a place as this.
▪ Somebody else might have started a fight or caused a commotion.
▪ They would pretend to get pissed and start a fight.
▪ He can even start a fight to draw us into a trap.
win
▪ The deal, which is worth almost seventeen million pounds, depends on Morland winning its fight for survival.
▪ If champions are gauged by their ability to win tough fights, Marco Antonio Barrera has quite a future.
▪ Badger victory Wildlife campaigners are celebrating after winning an 18 year fight to protect badgers from badger baiting.
▪ Emile won maybe 20 title fights after that.
▪ So who wins the fight for the remote?
▪ Regardless, he did not win that fight.
▪ Successive personnel managers had always caved in to his demands as they knew full well that Clasper would win a stand-up fight.
▪ They won the field position fight by a huge margin.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a fight to the finish
▪ It will be a fight to the finish.
▪ Six teams are bitter rivals in what will be a fight to the finish.
be spoiling for a fight/argument
▪ Be that as it may, Cooper was spoiling for a fight, as this unpublished letter shows.
fight tooth and nail
▪ We had to fight tooth and nail to get the government to admit they were wrong.
▪ He fought tooth and nail for 15 months before going to sleep one final night last week.
▪ He would also fight tooth and nail to keep her from the likes of Tommy Allen.
▪ Legislation aimed at forcing the power firms to clean up their act is being fought tooth and nail by the polluters.
▪ They fought tooth and nail through an initial series of leagues and finished in seven knockout matches.
▪ They fought tooth and nail to protect the solicitors' monopoly of conveyancing but eventually compromised by not objecting to licensed conveyancers.
fight your corner/fight sb's corner
fight your own battles
▪ She has a talent for playing modern women who must find the inner strength to fight their own battles.
▪ Surely it is better for the townsfolk themselves to develop the necessary skills to fight their own battles?
▪ We invaded Ireland and fought our own battles there.
grudge fight/match
▪ None of the combatants in this grunge grudge match are over 20.
▪ Six other players were sin-binned as Britain beat New Zealand 3-2 in a grudge match.
have no stomach for a fight/task etc
▪ They proved to have no stomach for a fight with only Steve Regeling showing any semblance of spirit.
live to see/fight another day
▪ A conciliatory gesture, some argued, would appease the cardinal and Holy Trinity would live to fight another day.
▪ By his diplomacy, it was true, Gordon had lived to fight another day.
▪ Having lived to fight another day, Mayer did - with Sam Goldwyn.
▪ Or will they live to fight another day?
▪ Pol pot lives to fight another day despite butchering millions of his people.
▪ The choice for us was whether to take a strike unprepared or to live to fight another day.
pick a quarrel/fight (with sb)
▪ Anthony Ryan was known in his family as able to pick a fight with his own fingernails.
▪ Barton Lynch's manager had once picked a fight with him.
▪ But it is hard to pick a quarrel with pasta.
▪ From a lack of communication, parents are more likely to misunderstand, blame, or pick fights with one another.
▪ Had never picked a fight in his life.
▪ His favorite thing is to pick fights with me and then leave brown lunch bags on our doorstep.
▪ The first thing Vicious does is start picking fights with these guys who are supposed to protect him.
▪ We adults do the same: we come home from work and start complaining or picking a fight.
pillow fight
▪ Is it like a pillow fight with rock-hard chestnuts?
put up a fight/struggle/resistance
▪ By then I realized it was all too late anyway so I didn't put up a fight.
▪ Had he, perhaps, put up a fight?
▪ I bet you did that last night. - Did she put up a fight, then?
▪ I start running, but my body puts up a fight.
▪ Instead of dragging everything into the open and putting up a fight, I held on in silence.
▪ Not only relieved by beating Dallas, but yes, this team can put up a fight.
▪ The temptation was great to muster what force we could and put up a fight.
run/hurt/fight etc like hell
▪ I know he lost his legs first, and then his fingers-he died alone and it hurt like hell.
▪ I remember running like hell, knowing I was being pursued and looking back for Sarah, who didn't join me.
▪ I was able to breathe only with the utmost difficulty, and my arm hurt like hell.
▪ Must have fought like hell to find its niche within the forest, to distinguish itself within the pack.
▪ My forehead hurt like hell and my body was bruised all over, but no bones were broken.
▪ Run, North, run; just run like hell.
▪ Spring sauntered north, but he had to run like hell to keep it as his traveling companion.
▪ We fought like hell for most of the time.
three-cornered contest/fight
▪ Third, after a terrific three-cornered fight, were David Hoskins and David James.
throw a match/game/fight
▪ This year, he is throwing a game party at his home in Austin.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A couple of fights broke out near the stadium after the game.
▪ A good fight once in a while can clear the air.
▪ Are you going to watch the big fight tomorrow?
▪ He had been at the pub for several hours before getting into a fight with another man.
▪ He knocked out his opponent only five minutes into the fight.
▪ He was a hero in the fight for independence from France.
▪ How did you get that black eye? Were you in a fight?
▪ New laws have been passed to help the police in their fight against organized crime.
▪ The fight against malnutrition and preventable diseases must continue.
▪ the fight between Joe Louis and Rocky Marciano
▪ There was a massive fight after school yesterday.
▪ Three of his ribs were broken in a fight.
▪ Tyson's fight against Evander Holyfield
▪ Women's fight for equality has not ended.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But Eliades is demanding that pot, plus Lewis' fight fee of around £5m, is frozen by a court judge.
▪ I went through with the fight, like I had said, knocked him out.
▪ If we had a fight I know I'd win, easy-peasy.
▪ It is considered one of the most significant developments in the fight against many brain disorders and diseases.
▪ Northener Warren Goss takes up: Night came, yet the fight went on....
▪ So anyway, so how did somebody almost get into a fight besides him and Jessica?
▪ That was the other thing, it took me a long fight to get my eye drops.
Wikipedia

Fight (disambiguation)

Combat or fighting, is purposeful violent conflict intended to establish dominance over the opposition.

Fight or Fighting may also refer to:

Fight (Mayumi Iizuka album)

is J-pop artist Mayumi Iizuka's 13th album.

Fight (Flipper album)

Fight is Flipper's fifth live album.

Fight (band)

Fight was an English-American heavy metal band assembled by Judas Priest frontman, Rob Halford, after his departure from that band in 1992. He took with him from Judas Priest and Racer X drummer Scott Travis, though Travis also continued to drum for Judas Priest. The line-up was completed by Russ Parrish on guitar, Brian Tilse on guitar and keyboards and Jack "Jay Jay" Brown on bass guitar, the latter of the two former members of Cyanide.

The band's musical proposal was quite different from Halford's then-former band; it was a mix between the heavy metal sound created by Judas Priest, and a thrash/ groove metal sound similar to that of Pantera.

In 2007, Rob Halford's Metal God Entertainment released War of Words – The Film on DVD.

Fight (Natalia Barbu song)

"Fight" was the Moldovan entry in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007, performed in English by Natalia Barbu. The song was written by Elena Buga and composed by Alexandru Braşoveanu.

The song is a metal-based number, comparable to Within Temptation or Evanescence in sound. Barbu sings about the need to "fight" in order "to face this cruel world", and sings that this is in fact the only way to get ahead. The melody line is provided by a violin, which Barbu herself plays in the video, as well as playing in the live performances. Barbu laughingly said that even though she couldn't play live at Eurovision (the rules forbid this), the background track violin is played by her and that it was actually a very easy part since she has been playing since she was seven years old.

The video features a number of schoolboys racing each other over what appears to be an unmarked cross-country course. Over the course of the song, all of the boys with one exception fall over, leaving one as the victor.

During her performances, Barbu wore a bodysuit as well as pants which appeared to be very low-slung. BBC commentator Terry Wogan made reference to this and urged his viewers to call out "Pull your pants up!" at the start of the song.

As Moldova had not finished the previous Contest in the top ten, the song was performed in the semi-final. Here, it was performed ninth (following Switzerland's DJ BoBo with " Vampires Are Alive" and preceding the Netherlands' Edsilia Rombley with " On Top of the World"). At the close of voting, it had received 91 points, placing 10th in a field of 28 and qualifying Moldova for the final.

In the final, it was performed 24th (following Armenia's Hayko with " Anytime You Need"). At the close of voting, it had received 109 points, placing 10th in a field of 24.

Category:Eurovision songs of 2007 Category:Eurovision songs of Moldova Category:2007 songs

Fight (Doro album)

Fight is the eighth studio album of the German female hard rock singer Doro Pesch. It was released worldwide in 2002 by SPV/Steamhammer.

Fight is the first Doro album since Force Majeure to be produced with a strong contribution from the members of the band that accompanied the German singer on her tours. Nick Douglas, Joe Taylor and Johnny Dee had toured with Doro for more than ten years, while Oliver Palotai replaced Mario Parillo after his death in 2001.

The songs of the album are the usual mix of aggressive metal and soft ballads, with a distinctive rawer sound than in previous albums. At this time Doro tried some versions of the songs in languages different form English or German. What remains of these recordings are the chorus of "Salvaje" in Spanish and the chorus of the single's b-side "Tourjour pour Gasner" in French. The list of musicians sees the contribution of various guests: Type O Negative vocalist Peter Steele, Savatage guitarist Chris Caffery, former Plasmatics bassist Jean Beauvoir, veteran composer Russ Ballard and usual collaborators Chris Lietz, Jürgen Engler and Andreas Bruhn.

The title track was used by German boxer Regina Halmich to introduce her performances, while "Always Live to Win" became the official theme of Rhein Fire NFL Europe football team. "Legends Never Die" is a cover of a song performed by Wendy O. Williams on her album WOW of 1984.

The album was re-released on CD and vinyl on 25 January 2010 by SPV/Steamhammer with some bonus tracks. The extensive booklet includes new photos and liner notes by Doro Pesch and Nick Douglas.

Fight peaked at position No. 18 in the German Longplay chart.

Fight (Kanjani Eight album)

Fight (stylized as FIGHT) is the fifth studio album released by the Japanese boy band Kanjani Eight. Fight was announced on September 8, 2011 as a new untitled album. On October 17, 2011, its release date and title were announced. There were three versions of this release: a 2 Disc regular edition and two CD+DVD limited editions. The first press release of the regular edition contains 7 trading cards while limited editions A and B contain a 48-page photo book. It was released on November 16, 2011. This album marked one year and three weeks since the release of their previous album, 8 Uppers.

Production for Fight began with the announcement of a triple single release along the course of three months: " T.W.L/Yellow Pansy Street", " My Home", " 365 Nichi Kazoku". These singles served as the theme songs for a movie and two television dramas. Another single, " Tsubusa ni Koi", was released in August 2011. All, of which, were commercial successes. Fight is a pop/rock-oriented album that incorporates elements of dance, R&B, ska and other genres to fill out the overall production. The album uses several instruments such as horns, drums, guitars, strings, and synthesizers. Kanjani Eight worked with several songwriters over the course of the album's production such as KenKen of RIZE, Yujin Kitagawa of Yuzu, and Sukimaswitch. They provided their own original material for the solo disc that came with the regular edition.

Commercially, Fight was a success, debuting at number one on the Oricon and Billboard Japan weekly charts. The album went on to be the twenty-first top sold album of 2011 on the Oricon and twenty-third on the Billboard Japan charts, respectively.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Fight

Fight \Fight\ (f[imac]t), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Fought (f[add]t); p. pr. & vb. n. Fighting.] [OE. fihten, fehten, AS. feohtan; akin to D. vechten, OHG. fehtan, G. fechten, Sw. f["a]kta, Dan. fegte, and perh. to E. fist; cf. L. pugnare to fight, pugnus fist.]

  1. To strive or contened for victory, with armies or in single combat; to attempt to defeat, subdue, or destroy an enemy, either by blows or weapons; to contend in arms; -- followed by with or against.

    You do fight against your country's foes.
    --Shak.

    To fight with thee no man of arms will deign.
    --Milton.

  2. To act in opposition to anything; to struggle against; to contend; to strive; to make resistance.

    To fight shy, to avoid meeting fairly or at close quarters; to keep out of reach.

Fight

Fight \Fight\, v. t.

  1. To carry on, or wage, as a conflict, or battle; to win or gain by struggle, as one's way; to sustain by fighting, as a cause.

    He had to fight his way through the world.
    --Macaulay.

    I have fought a good fight.
    --2 Tim. iv. 7.

  2. To contend with in battle; to war against; as, they fought the enemy in two pitched battles; the sloop fought the frigate for three hours.

  3. To cause to fight; to manage or maneuver in a fight; as, to fight cocks; to fight one's ship.

    To fight it out, to fight until a decisive and conclusive result is reached.

Fight

Fight \Fight\, n. [OE. fight, feht, AS. feoht. See Fight, v. i.]

  1. A battle; an engagement; a contest in arms; a combat; a violent conflict or struggle for victory, between individuals or between armies, ships, or navies, etc.

    Who now defies thee thrice to single fight.
    --Milton.

  2. A struggle or contest of any kind.

  3. Strength or disposition for fighting; pugnacity; as, he has a great deal of fight in him. [Colloq.]

  4. A screen for the combatants in ships. [Obs.]

    Up with your fights, and your nettings prepare.
    --Dryden.

    Running fight, a fight in which the enemy is continually chased; also, one which continues without definite end or result.

    Syn: Combat; engagement; contest; struggle; encounter; fray; affray; action; conflict. See Battle.

WordNet

fight

  1. v. be engaged in a fight; carry on a fight; "the tribesmen fought each other"; "Siblings are always fighting" [syn: struggle]

  2. fight against or resist strongly; "The senator said he would oppose the bill"; "Don't fight it!" [syn: oppose, fight back, fight down, defend]

  3. make a strenuous or labored effort; "She struggled for years to survive without welfare"; "He fought for breath" [syn: struggle]

  4. exert oneself continuously, vigorously, or obtrusively to gain an end or engage in a crusade for a certain cause or person; be an advocate for; "The liberal party pushed for reforms"; "She is crusading for women's rights"; "The Dean is pushing for his favorite candidate" [syn: crusade, press, campaign, push, agitate]

  5. [also: fought]

fight

  1. n. the act of fighting; any contest or struggle; "a fight broke out at the hockey game"; "there was fighting in the streets"; "the unhappy couple got into a terrible scrap" [syn: fighting, combat, scrap]

  2. an intense verbal dispute; "a violent fight over the bill is expected in the Senate"

  3. a boxing match; "the fight was on television last night" [syn: bout]

  4. a hostile meeting of opposing military forces in the course of a war; "Grant won a decisive victory in the battle of Chickamauga"; "he lost his romantic ideas about war when he got into a real engagement" [syn: battle, conflict, engagement]

  5. an aggressive willingness to compete; "the team was full of fight" [syn: competitiveness]

  6. [also: fought]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

fight

Old English feohtan "to combat, contend with weapons, strive; attack; gain by fighting, win" (intransitive; class III strong verb; past tense feaht, past participle fohten), from Proto-Germanic *fehtan (cognates: Old High German fehtan, German fechten, Middle Dutch and Dutch vechten, Old Frisian fiuhta "to fight"), from PIE *pek- (2) "to pluck out" (wool or hair), apparently with a notion of "pulling roughly" (cognates: Greek pekein "to comb, shear," pekos "fleece, wool;" Persian pashm "wool, down," Latin pectere "to comb," Sanskrit paksman- "eyebrows, hair").\n

\nSpelling substitution of -gh- for a "hard H" sound was a Middle English scribal habit, especially before -t-. In some late Old English examples, the middle consonant was represented by a yogh. Among provincial early Modern English spellings, Wright lists faight, fate, fecht, feeght, feight, feit, feyght, feyt, feort, foight.\n

\nFrom c.1200 as "offer resistance, struggle;" also "to quarrel, wrangle, create a disturbance." From late 14c. as "be in conflict." Transitive use from 1690s. To fight for "contest on behalf of" is from early 14c. To fight back "resist" is recorded from 1890. Well figt þat wel fligt ("he fights well that flies fast") was a Middle English proverb.

fight

Old English feohte, gefeoht "a fight, combat, hostile encounter;" see fight (v.). Compare Old Frisian fiucht, Old Saxon fehta, Dutch gevecht, Old High German gifeht, German Gefecht. Meaning "power or inclination to fight" is from 1812.

Wiktionary

fight

n. 1 An occasion of fighting. 2 (context archaic English) A battle between opposing armies. 3 A physical confrontation or combat between two or more people or groups. 4 (context sports English) A boxing or martial arts match. 5 A conflict, possibly nonphysical, with opposing ideas or forces; strife. vb. 1 (label en intransitive) To contend in physical conflict, either singly or in war, battle etc. 2 (label en intransitive) To strive for; to campaign or contend for success.

Usage examples of "fight".

People would always fight, argue, bicker and disagree, whether influenced by abiding Interlopers or not.

But, as it was, he ably supported the exposed flank that Johnston so skillfully attacked, won the battle, inflicted losses a good deal larger than his own, and gained his ulterior objective as well as if there had not been a fight at all.

In fact, the opening was depressingly familiar, full of protestations of loyalty to both King George and the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, plus a promise that the authors would willingly fight the French, indeed die for their country, but they could not face another day aboard such a hellish ship.

But this is not your fight, and if things do not go well aboard Persephone I rather fear there will be little quarter, given or taken.

Those three literati were the Marquis Maffei, the Abbe Conti, and Pierre Jacques Martelli, who became enemies, according to public rumour, owing to the belief entertained by each of them that he possessed the favours of the actress, and, being men of learning, they fought with the pen.

If Addis takes you in, he will fight a war before he lets harm come to you.

Who understood everything which had happened to her and continued the fight with all the unyielding courage he loved and admired so much, refusing to surrender to the freak cataclysm which had exploded into her life.

They will find no Pelton, but they will find three women who will swear that, yes, you and your men demanded admittance last night, whereupon you behaved with drunken debauchery, fighting amongst yourselves.

Her childhood and adolescence had been full enough of taps on the phone, cars across the street, name-calling and fights in school.

How was it possible to endure such a scene going on in the presence of an innocent girl whom I adored, when I had to fight hard myself with my own burning desires so as not to abuse her innocence!

Orange was hailed with approbation and delight by the Catholic leaders, those promoted by Adrets excited such a storm of indignation, among the Huguenots of all classes, that he shortly afterwards went over to the other side, and was found fighting against the party he had disgraced.

He told himself that it was the other aeronaut that had been shot in the fight and fallen out of the saddle as he strove to land.

Battle of North India, in which the entire Anglo-Indian aeronautic settlement establishment fought for three days against overwhelming odds, and was dispersed and destroyed in detail.

The Firelord took dragon form to fight Erreth-Akbe, but was defeated at last, at the cost of the forests and cities of Ilien, which he set afire as he fought.

Most of the blood still had not returned to his brain, he had been enjoying the afterglow of one of the most erotic, sensual interludes in his life, and this impossible woman had to pick a fight with him, ruining the moment.