Find the word definition

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

fibre

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a high sugar/salt/fibre etc content
▪ Red meat tends to have a high fat content.
fibre optics
▪ fibre optic cables
glass fibre
moral fibreBritish English, moral fiber American English (= the emotional strength to do what is right)
▪ Single parents are sometimes treated as though they lack moral fibre.
optical fibre
synthetic fibres/materials/fabrics
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
dietary
▪ Fresh fruit, for instance, being mainly water, provides only a dilute form of dietary fibre.
▪ In this we reveal the number of calories and the quantity of dietary fibre present in the useful canned and packaged foods.
▪ The role played by dietary fibre is of importance to this compartmentalisation because it binds bile acids.
▪ The foods which we are advised to eat in greater quantities arc those supplying dietary fibre.
▪ It seems strange that this great surge of medical interest in dietary fibre should have occurred only in the past decade.
▪ This intriguing finding from the surveys led medical researchers to investigations into a whole new aspect of dietary fibre.
▪ But dietary fibre provides nothing of use in this way.
▪ You are, you see, still consuming a very high percentage of dietary fibre.
high
▪ Breakfast each day consists of high fibre cereals with skimmed milk and a Vitamin C enriched orange drink.
▪ Team it with high fibre beans, bread or pasta and you have a supper or lunch dish of real potential.
▪ Plant proteins also have the advantage of being low in fat and high in fibre.
▪ It is also low in fact and high in fibre.
▪ It made no pretence of catering to faddish tastes like vegetarianism or high fibre diets.
▪ The proliferative zone, however, was expanded in the distal colon of the higher fibre diet fed rats.
▪ It's no lower in calories, but it's higher in fibre and unrefined carbohydrates.
▪ Two further patients could not tolerate the high fibre diet and the remaining three defaulted for no apparent reason.
low
▪ These diets are now frowned upon by many medical experts because of their low fibre content.
▪ At postmortem, the low fibre diet rats had more abnormalities and tumours of body tissue than the higher fibre diet rats.
▪ Even when he was trying to be a criminal, the low moral fibre shone through.
▪ Three rats in the low fibre diet group suffered from middle ear infections and were removed from the study.
▪ Conversely, a low fibre diet did not lead to changes in cellular proliferation which might be associated with mucosal instability.
▪ It has a low fibre content and a low portion weight, so its fibre contribution to the average diet is negligible.
▪ It is largely because the bran is stripped from white flour that our Western diet has become low in natural fibre content.
moral
▪ But now I shall leave you with one final anecdote which impinges on both issues of morale and moral fibre.
▪ Even when he was trying to be a criminal, the low moral fibre shone through.
▪ The Zeitgeist has proved more powerful than her own undoubted moral fibre and the historical influence of her own Church and family.
▪ Some people believe that the effect of the Zeitgeist is invariably to weaken moral fibre and signal the downfall of the nation.
▪ The problem does not arise merely through lack of moral fibre.
▪ It isn't just lack of moral fibre which leads to a rising divorce rate.
natural
▪ Although it is a natural fibre, it tends not to weather well.
▪ Fresh water rotted natural fibre, while seawater preserved it.
▪ Hair is a marvellous natural fibre - you could almost compare it to pure silk thread.
▪ The reason is that fruit juices are simply fruit stripped of its natural fibre content.
▪ And yet many foods are now refined to such an extent that the natural fibre has been removed.
▪ It is largely because the bran is stripped from white flour that our Western diet has become low in natural fibre content.
▪ It feels like a natural fibre yet has all the advantages of a modern synthetic material.
▪ A Ramie is a natural, linen-type fibre that gives fabric a most attractive slub finish.
new
▪ They were given a grandstand view of how the world's first new man-made fibre for 30 years is manufactured.
optical
▪ It also explains why it is virtually certain that Britain's main trunk lines will rely on optical fibre.
▪ You will also need a length of optical fibre.
▪ An optical fibre uses total internal reflection to carry a light beam over long distance and around corners.
▪ It is interesting to examine the optical fibre before using it in the communications system.
▪ IskraTEL specialists are currently laying optical fibre cables to connect the city's exchanges.
▪ Next came an all-optical experiment using an optical fibre as nonlinear medium { 32 }, demonstrating 12 and chaos.
▪ The obstacle to optical fibre communication is lift loss due to impurities in the glass.
▪ It is not the purpose here to explain exactly how an optical fibre works in terms of total internal reflection.
synthetic
▪ A synthetic fibre with a foam or waffle backing is best.
▪ The extra strength of synthetic fibre allows Evergreen to spin finer yarns with efficiency.
■ NOUN
carbon
▪ The canopy, which hinges forwards, is made of flat sheets of poly-carbonate, framed with carbon fibre for stiffness.
▪ The body is aluminium and carbon fibre, and the chassis is glued together for extra fly-away lightness.
▪ These carbon fibre rollers are used by firms manufacturing machines for a variety of uses including films, textiles and paper.
▪ They are made by winding resin-laced strands of carbon fibre round a mandrel and then curing in an oven.
▪ One of them big mining companies did it, only they used carbon fibre.
▪ These chitin fibres are embedded in matrix materials, making the wall material like a carbon fibre composite.
▪ And because the body is made from light carbon fibre, the result is a staggering 380 brake horsepower per ton.
▪ The architects say the carbon fibre structure is a design for the nineties.
content
▪ Our existing nutritional labelling gives a full description of sugar, fat and fibre content.
▪ They have proved beneficial for plants partly because of their cotton fibre content, which lends moisture.
▪ These diets are now frowned upon by many medical experts because of their low fibre content.
▪ The reason is that fruit juices are simply fruit stripped of its natural fibre content.
▪ Gain all the well-established health advantages of eating meals high in dietary fibre content.
▪ No need to weigh these fruits; day-to-day variations will tend to balance out the calorie and fibre content.
▪ A reduced fibre content of the diet on its own might be an important contributor to the development of colonic cancer.
▪ It has a low fibre content and a low portion weight, so its fibre contribution to the average diet is negligible.
diet
▪ The proliferative zone, however, was expanded in the distal colon of the higher fibre diet fed rats.
▪ Two further patients could not tolerate the high fibre diet and the remaining three defaulted for no apparent reason.
▪ At postmortem, the low fibre diet rats had more abnormalities and tumours of body tissue than the higher fibre diet rats.
▪ He had a high fibre diet and plenty of exercise.
▪ After a week or so of this high fibre diet, your constipation should ease and your normal bowel habits return.
▪ Three rats in the low fibre diet group suffered from middle ear infections and were removed from the study.
▪ Conversely, a low fibre diet did not lead to changes in cellular proliferation which might be associated with mucosal instability.
glass
▪ His flying saucer, however, is made of glass fibre and runs on compressed air.
▪ During the summer, he had insulated the roof by filling the areas between the joists with glass fibre wool.
▪ Rockwool mineral wool in blanket form is an effective alternative to glass fibre.
▪ The handles are made from nylon-reinforced glass fibre for extra strength.
▪ Left: Typical of the rigid frame using glass fibre tubing on the earlier steerable deltas is seen on this example.
▪ Below: The range of glass fibre tubing, in this case moulded in various colours.
▪ It must be borne in mind that more copper equates to more adhesive holding the copper foil on to the glass fibre panel.
▪ Leak-Fix seals leaks in tanks made of steel, copper, lead, aluminium and glass fibre.
intake
▪ Those allowing themselves 1,500 calories daily might reach a fibre intake of 50g daily.
optics
▪ Measuring current with light Another area of activity for King's is in fibre optics.
▪ DONs can be a fast way of establishing links between major conurbations, often by means of fibre optics.
▪ The DoI runs a mass of schemes to support research in particular areas, ranging from robots to fibre optics.
■ VERB
eat
▪ Many people know they should be cutting down on fat and eating more fibre.
use
▪ Next came an all-optical experiment using an optical fibre as nonlinear medium { 32 }, demonstrating 12 and chaos.
▪ Left: Typical of the rigid frame using glass fibre tubing on the earlier steerable deltas is seen on this example.
▪ Now I've started using coconut fibre which is a peat substitute.
▪ All the modules are linked using a redundant fibre optic cable.
▪ One of the projects close to commercial realisation uses optical fibre to sense a current flowing in a conductor.
▪ But others are concerned that the telecommunications industry may be rushing to use novel types of fibre before the technology is proven.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Courtaulds España produces 62,000 tonnes of acrylic fibre a year.
▪ Every tiny fragment of fibre, denim and leather was picked up and dropped in the bags.
▪ It is difficult to join monomode fibre because the tiny cores must be accurately aligned.
▪ The sample is trapped from a large volume of solution on to a coated fibre.
▪ This intriguing finding from the surveys led medical researchers to investigations into a whole new aspect of dietary fibre.
Wiktionary

fibre

n. 1 (senseid en single elongated piece of material)(context countable English) A single piece of a given material, elongated and roughly round in cross-section, often twisted with other fibres to form thread. 2 (senseid en material in the form of fibres)(context uncountable English) Material in the form of fibres. 3 dietary fibre. 4 Moral strength and resolve. 5 (context mathematics English) The preimage of a given point in the range of a map. 6 (context computing English) A kind of lightweight thread of execution. 7 A long tubular cell found in muscle tissue ; myocyte.

WordNet

fibre

  1. n. a slender and greatly elongated solid substance [syn: fiber]

  2. the inherent complex of attributes that determine a persons moral and ethical actions and reactions; "education has for its object the formation of character"- Herbert Spencer [syn: character, fiber]

  3. a leatherlike material made by compressing layers of paper or cloth [syn: fiber, vulcanized fiber]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

fibre

chiefly British English spelling of fiber (q.v.); for spelling, see -re.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

fibre

fibre \fibre\ n. Same as fiber. [Mostly British usage]

Wikipedia

Usage examples of "fibre".

Our cooks employ it with vinegar for making the mint sauce which we eat with roast lamb, because of its condimentary virtues as a spice to the immature meat, whilst the acetic acid of the vinegar serves to help dissolve the crude albuminous fibre.

A faint clarion call sounded and, with an appalling suddenness, horror and darkness engulfed him as he battled, weary in every fibre of his soul and body, against the endless waves of an unseen enemy that must inevitably triumph.

The bather had no soap, but used rough fibre gloves with which he rubbed the surface of his skin until it glowed.

When sulphuric acid is used as the assistant along with the bichrome, then there is formed on the wool fibre a deposit of chromic acid and chromium oxide, and this exerts an oxidising effect on the colouring matter or dye-stuff, which in some cases, as the Alizarine Blue, Alizarine Yellow, etc.

A great deal of water, remarked the brief, bitterish smile, would have to go over the dam before Phyllis Dexter--dimpled and rosy and twenty-three--could realize what it meant to have a double handful of deep-rooted fixations ripped out of your viscera or wherever they were located, and every dangling, aching, red nerve fibre of them coolly examined under a microscope.

As found in grains, it is mixed with a certain amount of vegetable fibre, covered with husks, or skin, and has the little germ or budlet of the coming plant inside it.

I been able to give an idea of the extreme antiquity, the perfect cleanliness, nor the vibrating song of the cicalas that seems to have been stored away within it, in its parched-up fibres, during hundreds of summers.

The chemical constituents of the Strawberry are--a peculiar volatile aroma, sugar, mucilage, pectin, citric and malic acids in equal parts, woody fibre, and water.

There was a moment of disorientation as she interpreted the picture being fed along the optical fibre plugged into her coccyx ganglion splice.

Alizarine Cyanines is a considerable advantage, by causing the dye-stuff to penetrate the fibre better and to give more uniform shades.

The frame was a modern carbon fibre composite, fitted with a derailleur gear-change made by Shimano of Japan.

Matching of Hues -- Purity and Luminosity of Colours -- Matching Bright Hues -- Aid of Tinted Films -- Matching Difficulties Arising from Contrast -- Examination of Colours by Reflected and Transmitted Lights -- Effect of Lustre and Transparency of Fibres in Colour Matching -- Matching of Colours on Velvet Pile -- Optical Properties of Dye-stuffs, Dichroism, Fluorescence -- Use of Tinted Mediums -- Orange Film -- Defects of the Eye -- Yellowing of the Lens -- Colour Blindness, etc.

Towards assisting to digest, by their free acid, the immature fibre of young flesh meats, the Wood Sorrel leaves are commonly eaten as a dressing with veal, and lamb.

In the centre there is a group of elongated, cylindrical cells of unequal lengths, bluntly pointed at their upper ends, truncated or rounded at their lower ends, closely pressed together, and remarkable from being surrounded by a spiral line, which can be separated as a distinct fibre.

He was merely crass of fibre and function - thoughtless, careless, and liquorish, as his easily avoidable accident proves, and without that modicum of imagination which holds the average citizen within certain limits fixed by taste.