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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

far

I.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a further announcement
▪ A further announcement will be made in the near future.
a further clue (=an additional clue)
▪ They searched the surrounding area for further clues.
a further concession
▪ They refused any further concessions in the argument over agricultural exports.
a Further Education/FE collegeBritish English (= where adults can go to study, especially part-time)
a further/additional/added disadvantage
▪ It’s a very small garden and it has the further disadvantage of facing north.
a little more/better/further etc
▪ We’ll have to wait a little longer to see what happens.
advance/further/promote a cause (=help to achieve an aim)
▪ He did much to advance the cause of freedom.
an extra/added/additional/further dimension
▪ Movies soon had the added dimension of sound.
as far afield as
▪ They were exporting as far afield as Alexandria.
As far as I can make out
As far as I can make out, he has never been married.
As far as I know (=used when you think something is true but are not sure)
As far as I know, they’re arriving on Saturday .
be far from clear/be by no means clear (=be very unclear)
▪ The directions she gave me were far from clear.
by far the best
▪ One girl stood out as by far the best singer.
by far the worst (=much worse than any other)
▪ Last year was by far the worst for road accidents.
by far (=by a large amount or degree)
▪ Godard’s first film was better by far.
close behind/not far behind
▪ He set off down the road with the rest of us following close behind.
come far (=travelled a long way)
▪ Have you come far today?
fall far/a long way/well short of sth
▪ Facilities in these schools fall far short of the standards required.
far apart
▪ They have offices in countries as far apart as India and Peru.
far below,
▪ Somewhere far below, a door slammed.
far beyond
▪ Such tasks are far beyond the scope of the average schoolkid.
Far East
far from perfect (=not at all perfect)
▪ The weather conditions were far from perfect.
far from satisfactory
▪ This system was far from satisfactory for a number of reasons.
far from straightforward (=complicated)
▪ This area of law is far from straightforward.
far gone
▪ She’s pretty far gone – can you drive her home?
far inferior (=greatly inferior)
▪ He easily defeated a far inferior opponent.
far preferable
▪ Being taught in a small group is far preferable to being in a large, noisy classroom.
(far/rather/a little) too much
▪ There was too much work for one person.
▪ It would cost far too much to have the thing repaired.
far/vastly/greatly superior
▪ They soon realized that the opposing team’s players were far superior to their own.
from further afield
▪ students who come from further afield
from what I can gather/as far as I can gather (=this is what I believe to be true)
▪ She’s his niece, from what I can gather.
further accusations
▪ There were further accusations of incompetence.
further action
▪ No further action is necessary.
further aggravated
▪ Their money problems were further aggravated by a rise in interest rates.
further consideration
▪ The meeting was adjourned to allow time for further consideration.
further consultation
▪ It is recommended that further consultation should take place.
further education
further embarrassment (=extra or additional)
▪ His resignation should save the government any further embarrassment.
further examination (=a more detailed or careful examination)
▪ The results of the experiment merit further examination.
further expansion
▪ Investors think the hotel chain is ripe for further expansion.
further explanation (=additional reasons)
▪ He gave no further explanation for leaving, and she did not ask for any.
further improvement (=more improvement)
▪ We feel there is room for further improvement.
further particulars
▪ For further particulars, contact the College secretary.
further proof (=additional proof)
▪ He showed his driving licence as further proof of his identity.
further reading (=other things you can read)
▪ There’s a list of further reading at the end of each chapter.
further your aims (=help them to progress or be successful)
▪ The group is prepared to use violence to further its political aims.
further/higher education (=at a college or university)
▪ I did a carpentry course at the further education college.
further/higher up a scale
▪ Peasants managed their land as skilfully as some people higher up the social scale.
further/lower down a scale
▪ Bonuses are not paid to people lower down the salary scale.
further/more details
▪ Check our website for more details.
how much more/longer/further
▪ How much longer do we have to wait?
▪ How much further is it?
inquire further (=ask more questions)
▪ Toby would have liked to inquire further.
late/far into the night (=until very late at night)
▪ Staff worked late into the night to make necessary repairs.
left...far behind
▪ Sarah, with her long legs, soon left the rest of us far behind.
more/further/additional information
▪ For more information, visit our website.
much/a lot/far better
▪ We now have a much better understanding of the disease.
much/a lot/far less
▪ Social class matters a lot less than it used to.
much/a lot/far more
▪ Diane earns a lot more than I do.
much/a lot/far more
▪ Children generally feel much more confident working in groups.
much/a lot/far worse
▪ Conditions were much worse in rural areas.
much/far too
▪ Amanda is far too young to get married.
not trust sb an inch/not trust sb as far as you can throw them (=not trust someone at all)
sth is far from certain (=not definite)
▪ Success is far from certain.
take sth a stage further
▪ We then took the experiment a stage further.
take...further
▪ If you want to take it further, you should consult an attorney.
the far end (of sth) (=furthest from you)
▪ He walked to the far end of the room and sat at his desk.
the far side (=the other side, quite a long way away)
▪ Nicolo was standing on the far side of the room.
the far/furthest/vast reaches of space (=the far, furthest etc areas of space)
▪ Light takes time to travel across the vast reaches of space.
the far/furthest/vast reaches of space (=the far, furthest etc areas of space)
▪ Light takes time to travel across the vast reaches of space.
the far/opposite corner of sth (=furthest from where you are)
▪ Something was moving in the far right corner of the garden.
the further/outer reaches of sth
▪ the further reaches of the jungle
To complicate matters further
To complicate matters further, differences exist as regards legal systems, trade customs, and language.
until further notice (=from now until you are told something else)
▪ On the door was a sign: ‘Library closed until further notice’.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
easier
▪ Thankfully it's proved far easier to leave well alone.
▪ This was a more rewarding point for the visitors, who have a far easier run-in against group lightweights.
▪ But even so, it was far easier to set out a project for the Council than to implement it.
▪ As we have seen, it is far easier to parry a direct blow than to stop it forcibly.
▪ It would be far easier to do a pull-together about a Stock Exchange crash or Bosnia.
▪ It comes with the standard features found in more sophisticated packages, but is far easier to use.
▪ The information held electronically would be far easier to share.
▪ Again, this is easier than it seems and far easier to do than to put into words.
great
▪ One problem which proved far greater than anticipated was where no option was marked on the screening card.
▪ They also have far greater impact.
▪ They are undoubtedly right, since they take the manipulation of flesh to far greater extremes.
▪ She says the spiritual poverty of the West is far greater than the physical poverty of the so-called developing countries.
▪ The unification of the mind is far greater than the resolving of the dichotomy alone.
▪ To an extent far greater than any other organ, the brain adapts to changing conditions.
▪ It claims for all women a far greater potential in terms of powers and skills than any woman has ever demonstrated.
▪ Hospital closures provoke far greater numbers and rightly so.
high
▪ The report suggests that the upper range of warming over the next century could be far higher than estimated in 1995.
▪ The price proved to be far higher than anyone had expected.
▪ The scientists also believe that temperatures could rise far higher and faster than previously predicted if emissions are not curtailed.
▪ If one looks at people at risk, however, the num-ber was far higher.
▪ The ordinary commercial rate, at least for maritime loans, would have been far higher.
▪ Private investments historically have paid far higher rates of return than Social Security.
▪ The casualties could have been far higher.
▪ That meets a far higher standard than that of Rep.
right
▪ The caption alongside notes that George Davies, aged 19, is in the front row on the far right.
▪ Jesse Helms, stalwart of the Republican far right.
▪ The far right objects that the tests encourage children to criticise traditional values.
▪ Even in his final months Clinton is unwilling to take on demagogues to his far right.
▪ Paradoxically, the other major beneficiary from apparent disillusion with the established parties was the far right Front national.
▪ In the minds of some, Clinton moved too far right.
▪ The far right controls the agenda and the candidates.
▪ For now, at least, the cause of tax simplification seems to have been captured by the far right.
■ VERB
fall
▪ It showed that our formal control and planning mechanisms fell far short of what we would like.
▪ This enterprise has so far fallen far short of its targets, but it remains a high priority.
▪ Above all, the coercive force at the disposal of the Tsar fell far short of its imposing image.
▪ But the funds fall far short of what is needed.
▪ That falls far short of the holdings of one large commercial bank.
▪ Since then the number of killings in the civil war has fallen far below what it was two or three years ago.
▪ As expected, the 240-159 vote fell far short of the two-thirds majority needed to prevail.
go
▪ Companies were engaged in ways that went far beyond advice and consent.
▪ They were simple people who didn't go far from Cornwall.
▪ Sometimes I go far out of my way.
▪ The place is too far gone.
▪ In general, though, the managers felt the training did not go far enough.
▪ The importance of Smith's method went far beyond such simple applications, however.
▪ Whether the stadium logs another round of lease-backed debt will go far in determining the fate of other major capital-improvement projects here.
remove
▪ The popular image of a university is far removed from reality.
▪ Don Robey built an empire worth millions in a city far removed from the main line of entertainment.
▪ They were not far removed at any time from the poverty line, and more frequently below it than above it.
▪ He is too far removed from its formative processes.
▪ Celtic, however, are far removed from Leicester.
▪ Julio Gallo Winery, a California concern far removed from his Kansas home.
▪ The streets were busy but seemed far removed from the battle scene across the river.
▪ The actual policy response to the C D P analysis was far removed from the radical prescriptions of the activists.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
as far as I can judge
as far as sb is concerned
▪ As far as I'm concerned, this is the council's decision, not mine.
▪ It's a good deal, as far as I'm concerned.
as far as sth is concerned
▪ As far as bilingual education is concerned, the schools are not doing a good enough job.
▪ Where taxes are concerned, savings bonds are better than certificates of deposit.
be far removed from sth
▪ The world of TV sitcoms is far removed from reality.
▪ Action was being undertaken, but it was far removed from the radical surgery that seemed to be needed.
▪ Gironella is far removed from such light humour.
▪ He was far removed from the centralism embodied by his predecessors Ernest Bevin and Arthur Deakin.
▪ However, the content is far removed from the children's lives.
▪ The actual policy response to the C D P analysis was far removed from the radical prescriptions of the activists.
▪ The decisionmaking process which propels these large projects is far removed from the intended beneficiaries.
▪ The passenger was far removed from an anonymous piece of card, and the parachutes correspondingly larger to slow the descent speed.
▪ This will involve trade union negotiations in areas that may be far removed from their traditional expertise.
be few and far between
▪ Good jobs are few and far between these days.
▪ The schools are crowded, and good teachers are few and far between.
▪ Toys were few and far between, but the children invented games and played together.
▪ But for all this effort, meaningful accomplishments are few and far between.
▪ Deaf postgraduates, who are few and far between, have little chance of taking a higher degree.
▪ Facilities like the recently opened Russell Cairns Unit in Oxford are few and far between.
▪ Opportunities for young parents to socialize with each other are few and far between these days.
▪ Rough edges are few and far between.
▪ Sanatorium beds were few and far between, and often had to be obtained through influence.
▪ Shop said that all its stores were open but that customers were few and far between.
▪ The instances of this happening are few and far between.
carry sth too far/to extremes/to excess
▪ It was funny at first, but you've carried the joke too far.
cast your net (far and) wide
▪ I cast my net wide enough to find parents who vary from house cleaner to fashion designer to electrician to corporate manager.
▪ We cast our net wider and in a different direction.
far/further/farthest afield
▪ As his main hobby is sailing. and his friends have visited places as far afield as Cherbourg.
▪ But they have travelled as far afield as Belfast and Aberdeen.
▪ His success extends even further afield to victories at the Barbican in London.
▪ Some students venture further afield and choose courses in the Faculties of Arts or Social Sciences.
▪ The Takaroa operates from Cairns, and allows the visiting diver to venture further afield.
▪ To explore further afield, bicycle hire is available.
▪ You would probably peep out first, start looking round close to the spaceship and then start going further afield.
further to sth
look no further
▪ For a typical candidate, one need look no further than Keith Hill, bidding to take Streatham from the Tories.
▪ For evidence, look no further than the campaign trail.
▪ If the sheer quantity of information about 1992 is clouding your vision, look no further for the silver lining.
▪ In fact, I needed to look no further than the ground below me.
▪ Often they decide they like the idea of running one particular business and they look no further.
▪ Or need I look no further than the old man's unspoken mistrust of my intentions?
▪ You need look no further than last weekend for examples, when Kentucky and Kansas both lost their final games.
▪ You need look no further than Plautus himself.
no further forward
▪ The talks are no further forward than they were two weeks ago.
▪ Complications were growing and she was no further forward with her task.
▪ She was still no further forward.
▪ We're no further forward with either.
not very good/happy/far etc
▪ Are you - very happy, fairly happy, not very happy, or not happy at all?
▪ Governments are not very good at tinkering.
▪ He says his technique is not very good.
▪ Most humans are not very good at keeping secrets.
▪ My breathing was not very good at all.
▪ Other kids were not very good either, and we all inadvertently inhaled the pool again and again.
▪ Paul is not very good at pushing it yet.
▪ Relations with Admiral Boyd of the Joint Chiefs were not very good either.
nothing could be further from the truth
▪ A lot of people think soufflés are hard to make. Nothing could be further from the truth.
▪ They say he is a spy, but nothing could be further from the truth.
nothing could be further from the truth
nothing could be/is further from sb's mind/thoughts
so near and yet so far
so/as far as I am aware
sth must not go any further
still more/further/another/other
▪ And I sowed seeds and grew plants and trees so that that place would be still more beautiful.
▪ But the consumer could benefit still further.
▪ Clio engineers sought to improve still further on these virtues.
▪ His adversaries include still more cossacks, a border guard or two, a rabbi, and a pugilist.
▪ I had eaten four or five slices of bread without satisfying my hunger, so I reached for still another slice.
▪ Rape is a staple in pagan myth, and killing still more commonplace.
▪ The incentive to borrow was raised still further by a reduction in the costs of bankruptcy and an increase in market liquidity.
▪ With the passage of the Poor Law Amendment Act in 1834 the condition of labourers deteriorated still further.
take sth further
▪ We take it further than just explaining drug abuse and saying "Don't do it."
the Far East
the apple doesn't fall far from the tree
thus far
▪ Robinson thus far has been able to keep his promises to the voters.
▪ Attorney General Dan Lungren is the lone Republican candidate thus far.
▪ His policy thus far has been to do nothing but not to acknowledge the inaction.
▪ Suffice to have the benefits of their research, which has thus far produced the ultimate in extreme strength for smallest diameter.
▪ The Altru Hospital Auxiliary has given the largest contribution thus far.
▪ The changed look at once dissipated the sinister aspect that the gentleman had generated thus far.
▪ The discussion of space thus far has been somewhat backside foremost.
▪ There have been previous estimates that he had spent $ 12 million thus far.
until further notice
▪ All three schools were closed until further notice.
▪ The museum will be closed until further notice.
▪ A curfew was imposed until further notice in both Nouadhibou and Nouakchott.
▪ All its teams have been banned from international competitions until further notice.
▪ Althorp is closed to the public until further notice.
▪ An army spokesman said the curfew would continue until further notice, but army radio said it would be lifted on Sunday.
▪ Despite the plans to introduce a multiparty system, government sources confirmed that new parties would remain banned until further notice.
▪ Fast lanes closed on each carriageway until further notice with two lanes open for traffic.
▪ His coach told him a few days ago that he would come off the bench until further notice.
▪ Just keep sending the reports, he says, until further notice.
until further notice
▪ A curfew was imposed until further notice in both Nouadhibou and Nouakchott.
▪ All its teams have been banned from international competitions until further notice.
▪ Althorp is closed to the public until further notice.
▪ An army spokesman said the curfew would continue until further notice, but army radio said it would be lifted on Sunday.
▪ Despite the plans to introduce a multiparty system, government sources confirmed that new parties would remain banned until further notice.
▪ Fast lanes closed on each carriageway until further notice with two lanes open for traffic.
▪ His coach told him a few days ago that he would come off the bench until further notice.
▪ Just keep sending the reports, he says, until further notice.
without more/further ado
▪ And without more ado he booked his one-way ticket.
▪ Left leaderless, the city surrendered to Bustamante without further ado.
▪ Stan then moved closer to Melanie, and a major fight erupted without further ado.
▪ The emptying of the house could therefore no longer be postponed and Charlotte had decided to put matters in hand without further ado.
▪ The selection board interviewed him and rejected his application without further ado.
▪ Then, without more ado, he loaded the horses into the trailer.
▪ Then, without more ado, he turned on his heel and left, slamming the door behind him.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Cleveland isn't very far from here.
▪ I don't want to drive very far.
▪ I was now far behind the others and knew I couldn't catch up.
▪ We were sitting too far from the stage to hear what the actors were saying.
▪ We won't be able to go much farther because of the snow.
▪ Who do you think can jump the farthest?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Alfonsina Storni seems to have veered as far as possible to the opposite extreme.
▪ Because of the language barrier and culture shock, such insights are far too rare.
▪ But there were far too few new faces, and far too many head office honchos.
▪ Eventually Mark found a place for it far in the bows of the raft, like a miniature fourth mast.
▪ Lightning dipped and veered in a manner which was far too close for comfort.
▪ Only two children have talked about the incidents so far, she said.
▪ Some people were far more concerned about tuberculosis.
▪ Sometimes as far as sixty miles.
II.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
too
▪ We can agree that they carried these shows too far.
▪ The condescension was beginning to go too far.
▪ For there were many in that land who had taken their magical researches too far and into whose souls darkness entered.
▪ Do they extend the definition of murder too far, or are they too narrow.
▪ Mars is too far away from the Sun, and is too small.
▪ Don't forget that, and don't go too far.
▪ It's too far and much too costly and they couldn't possibly cover their expenses.
▪ Jokes with the younger farm-hands who were wise enough not to go too far with the granddaughter of the boss.
very
▪ The search didn't extend very far because Elsie never went more than two or three miles from home.
▪ At the very far end, it dipped smartly then rose again.
▪ Generally speaking, people did not move very far.
▪ In open, borderless capital markets, it is hard for borrowing costs to diverge very far.
▪ It wasn't a big bar, and they couldn't get very far from him.
▪ But their accumulation is very far from the complicated truth.
▪ But exclusion of the mystical did not advance knowledge very far.
▪ Without their support we could not have gone very far.
■ NOUN
bank
▪ He let go the clutch, lifted the front wheel and drove at the far bank, sand-spit dead ahead.
▪ On the farther bank of Ocean were mysterious peopIe, whom few on earth ever found their way to.
▪ I was met by a slow but very solid resistance moving down the far bank.
▪ They lived on the farther bank of Ocean.
▪ To cheers and aahs he emerged on the far bank, shook himself and set off in dripping pursuit.
▪ The far bank was not going to be vacated by the enemy without a struggle.
▪ He had either to swim to the far bank or return to the undergrowth.
▪ Trotting the far bank overhanging trees utilising stick float and caster three chub plus a specimen barbel of 7-15-0 obliged.
corner
▪ In the far corner a half-opened door led to a bedroom.
▪ In the far corner was a sagging bed and a cupboard.
▪ In the far corner was a bed and, beside this, slumped like a disused doll, lay the witch.
▪ Something in the far corner seemed to be alive.
▪ Another time, a photographer had ventured on to the reef that rose up from the sea at the far corner.
▪ Conrad was settled in an armchair in a far corner and felt like a witch in a coven.
▪ Satisfied, he withdrew to the far corner of the cage and settled down again.
▪ There were a couple of drinkers in the far corner, but no one noticed me.
cry
▪ Blonde Patsy, who is eight months pregnant, looked a far cry from the willowy screen siren bedded by Mel Gibson.
▪ The streets were dismal, a far cry from the paved streets and brick sidewalks of Philadelphia.
▪ The plateau was a far cry from the workaday cottages by the harbour.
▪ Now, people are eager to live in the center of town, and their homes are a far cry from suburbia.
▪ He was even a far cry from Pecham and Winchelsey.
▪ It was a far cry from the sinister sonic overload, and brooding, hypnotic effect of Rumble.
▪ It is a far cry from most people's idea of accountants at work.
▪ The shop is a far cry from the modern boutique, and still has stock dating back for generations.
distance
▪ The empty dress, a peeling poster of Mae West and in the far distance the Statue of Liberty.
▪ My glassy eyes look past her, past the camera, and past my father, into the far, far distance.
▪ BIn the far distance, the flames licked their way toward the beach like lava coming down the mountainsides.
▪ In the far distance was the blue outline of yet further hills.
▪ I find many compositions on hills or high vantage points from where you can see into the far distance.
▪ What I saw was principally field upon field rolling off into the far distance.
▪ There, in the far distance, were wintering geese.
▪ In the far distance they stopped, sniffing again, at a pink lump on the sand.
east
▪ Plans are also in hand to extend the railway to Beckton in the far east.
▪ The concert stage spans the width of the room at the far east end.
▪ Some crossed the island chain through Sumatra, Java and as far east as Bali.
▪ In fifth-century sources their territory is described as stretching as far east as the Elbe.
end
▪ It was situated at the far end of the house, above the sweet store room.
▪ He stood up and pointed it at the far end of the barn where a target was tacked on a windowless wall.
▪ The yard was empty except for a neat looking two-horse box and at the far end a large powerful motorbike.
▪ Later, Kathy pushed back the blankets and moved off to-ward the railing at the far end of the porch.
▪ We stopped at the far end just under the small choir loft where there was a recess leading up to the tower.
▪ Below the temple hill, at the far end of the beach, a dozen elderly workmen were waiting for us.
▪ At the far end, on the dais, Athelstan glimpsed John of Gaunt.
▪ The tip of its tail at the far end of the concrete pool could had been in a different county.
left
▪ Pearce concludes: the truth is that the far left is no longer that important.
▪ The libertarian view A third view of the revolution has been developed by writers on the far Left of the political spectrum.
▪ The far left is also being blamed for taking advantage of grievances.
▪ Off to the far left of her, jutting from the water, revealed by the ebb of the tide.
▪ Little Women and Anne of Green Gables represented the far left of my reading.
▪ The far left says they penalise children from minority groups.
▪ The array to the far left mimics the lead isotopic compositions at 130Myr.
north
▪ The old Lombard aristocracy was gradually crumbling away except in the far north and the distant south.
▪ Sykes's parents are from the far north.
▪ One theory says that tigers evolved in the far north.
▪ This would require the sun to be in the far north.
▪ It really was difficult to believe that we could be so far north.
▪ More important was the backing of Frank Keenan, the county assessor and a far North Side ward boss.
▪ We bought cartloads of parchment from Charterhouse, Oxford and even sent orders to places as far north as Norwich and Cambridge.
▪ Heading farther north, a journey along the 60 miles of coast road is rewarding for its spectacular views.
post
▪ Micky Bennett's free-kick was flicked on by Gary Blissett and Allon steered the ball in at the far post.
▪ Savio came down the left side, with Alexi Lalas marking him and crossed the ball to the far post.
▪ Villa hit the framework again almost immediately when a Richardson corner struck the far post.
▪ As Savio got close to the end line, he crossed the ball to the far post.
▪ Twice Cantona stole into position at the far post waiting in vain for crosses.
▪ Reads the game well, makes many timely interventions on the far post in defence.
▪ David Batty sent over a teasing cross and from beyond the far post Platt got in a powerful header.
▪ He pumped the ball over to the far post where Whitton finished off, heading past Alan Kelly from eight yards.
right
▪ The good tee shot was played to the far right of the fairway to set up a second shot to the left.
▪ The activities of the far right have been a cause for concern over here for a while now.
▪ However, the fact that the far right won more votes than the far-left should make everyone pause and reflect.
▪ Last comes the master volume rotary, with the mains rocker switch located to the far right.
side
▪ If it's drifting on the far side it will be up to the roof.
▪ The Director says that the Gamma rays can easily be detected at the far side of a foot of steel armor plating.
▪ Omega lies at an equal distance on the far side of Epsilon.
▪ You just walk down this corridor and around these elevators to the bank on the far side.
▪ On the far side of the room there is a fire burning in the fireplace.
▪ Once on the far side the pipers played while the men danced reels until they were dry.
▪ They went two abreast across the meadow and stopped at the edge of the wood on the far side.
south
▪ The corridor of land administered by the League extended as far south as Cracow, Göttingen and Cologne.
▪ Workers refuse to hire on for less, because cost of living is higher on the border than farther south.
▪ May I suggest that you include the rural parishes in Wyre District as far south as Garstang in this consultation.
▪ This is the largest gallery and the farthest South found in the Survey.
▪ Excavations south of the fort have shown the existence of contemporary timber buildings as far south as Blackfriars Street.
▪ There were archers from all parts of the country, from the north and as far south as Hampshire.
wall
▪ A few children were assembling all the props on a table over by the far wall.
▪ The dimness against the far wall was broken by light pouring out through an open door.
▪ He wandered over to the far wall.
▪ Hanging on the far wall was a large painting of a pale man in a plaid flannel shirt.
▪ I wondered what was on the other side of the far wall, for there was a green door in its centre.
▪ We will fire our pulse of light at such an angle that its passage to the far wall is five meters long.
▪ Then he kicked and came to rest against the far wall.
▪ The molten metal sculpture of the universe on the far wall is stunning.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
as far as I can judge
be far removed from sth
▪ The world of TV sitcoms is far removed from reality.
▪ Action was being undertaken, but it was far removed from the radical surgery that seemed to be needed.
▪ Gironella is far removed from such light humour.
▪ He was far removed from the centralism embodied by his predecessors Ernest Bevin and Arthur Deakin.
▪ However, the content is far removed from the children's lives.
▪ The actual policy response to the C D P analysis was far removed from the radical prescriptions of the activists.
▪ The decisionmaking process which propels these large projects is far removed from the intended beneficiaries.
▪ The passenger was far removed from an anonymous piece of card, and the parachutes correspondingly larger to slow the descent speed.
▪ This will involve trade union negotiations in areas that may be far removed from their traditional expertise.
be few and far between
▪ Good jobs are few and far between these days.
▪ The schools are crowded, and good teachers are few and far between.
▪ Toys were few and far between, but the children invented games and played together.
▪ But for all this effort, meaningful accomplishments are few and far between.
▪ Deaf postgraduates, who are few and far between, have little chance of taking a higher degree.
▪ Facilities like the recently opened Russell Cairns Unit in Oxford are few and far between.
▪ Opportunities for young parents to socialize with each other are few and far between these days.
▪ Rough edges are few and far between.
▪ Sanatorium beds were few and far between, and often had to be obtained through influence.
▪ Shop said that all its stores were open but that customers were few and far between.
▪ The instances of this happening are few and far between.
carry sth too far/to extremes/to excess
▪ It was funny at first, but you've carried the joke too far.
cast your net (far and) wide
▪ I cast my net wide enough to find parents who vary from house cleaner to fashion designer to electrician to corporate manager.
▪ We cast our net wider and in a different direction.
far/further/farthest afield
▪ As his main hobby is sailing. and his friends have visited places as far afield as Cherbourg.
▪ But they have travelled as far afield as Belfast and Aberdeen.
▪ His success extends even further afield to victories at the Barbican in London.
▪ Some students venture further afield and choose courses in the Faculties of Arts or Social Sciences.
▪ The Takaroa operates from Cairns, and allows the visiting diver to venture further afield.
▪ To explore further afield, bicycle hire is available.
▪ You would probably peep out first, start looking round close to the spaceship and then start going further afield.
further to sth
look no further
▪ For a typical candidate, one need look no further than Keith Hill, bidding to take Streatham from the Tories.
▪ For evidence, look no further than the campaign trail.
▪ If the sheer quantity of information about 1992 is clouding your vision, look no further for the silver lining.
▪ In fact, I needed to look no further than the ground below me.
▪ Often they decide they like the idea of running one particular business and they look no further.
▪ Or need I look no further than the old man's unspoken mistrust of my intentions?
▪ You need look no further than last weekend for examples, when Kentucky and Kansas both lost their final games.
▪ You need look no further than Plautus himself.
not very good/happy/far etc
▪ Are you - very happy, fairly happy, not very happy, or not happy at all?
▪ Governments are not very good at tinkering.
▪ He says his technique is not very good.
▪ Most humans are not very good at keeping secrets.
▪ My breathing was not very good at all.
▪ Other kids were not very good either, and we all inadvertently inhaled the pool again and again.
▪ Paul is not very good at pushing it yet.
▪ Relations with Admiral Boyd of the Joint Chiefs were not very good either.
nothing could be further from the truth
▪ A lot of people think soufflés are hard to make. Nothing could be further from the truth.
▪ They say he is a spy, but nothing could be further from the truth.
nothing could be further from the truth
nothing could be/is further from sb's mind/thoughts
so near and yet so far
sth must not go any further
still more/further/another/other
▪ And I sowed seeds and grew plants and trees so that that place would be still more beautiful.
▪ But the consumer could benefit still further.
▪ Clio engineers sought to improve still further on these virtues.
▪ His adversaries include still more cossacks, a border guard or two, a rabbi, and a pugilist.
▪ I had eaten four or five slices of bread without satisfying my hunger, so I reached for still another slice.
▪ Rape is a staple in pagan myth, and killing still more commonplace.
▪ The incentive to borrow was raised still further by a reduction in the costs of bankruptcy and an increase in market liquidity.
▪ With the passage of the Poor Law Amendment Act in 1834 the condition of labourers deteriorated still further.
take sth further
▪ We take it further than just explaining drug abuse and saying "Don't do it."
the Far East
the apple doesn't fall far from the tree
thus far
▪ Robinson thus far has been able to keep his promises to the voters.
▪ Attorney General Dan Lungren is the lone Republican candidate thus far.
▪ His policy thus far has been to do nothing but not to acknowledge the inaction.
▪ Suffice to have the benefits of their research, which has thus far produced the ultimate in extreme strength for smallest diameter.
▪ The Altru Hospital Auxiliary has given the largest contribution thus far.
▪ The changed look at once dissipated the sinister aspect that the gentleman had generated thus far.
▪ The discussion of space thus far has been somewhat backside foremost.
▪ There have been previous estimates that he had spent $ 12 million thus far.
until further notice
▪ A curfew was imposed until further notice in both Nouadhibou and Nouakchott.
▪ All its teams have been banned from international competitions until further notice.
▪ Althorp is closed to the public until further notice.
▪ An army spokesman said the curfew would continue until further notice, but army radio said it would be lifted on Sunday.
▪ Despite the plans to introduce a multiparty system, government sources confirmed that new parties would remain banned until further notice.
▪ Fast lanes closed on each carriageway until further notice with two lanes open for traffic.
▪ His coach told him a few days ago that he would come off the bench until further notice.
▪ Just keep sending the reports, he says, until further notice.
without more/further ado
▪ And without more ado he booked his one-way ticket.
▪ Left leaderless, the city surrendered to Bustamante without further ado.
▪ Stan then moved closer to Melanie, and a major fight erupted without further ado.
▪ The emptying of the house could therefore no longer be postponed and Charlotte had decided to put matters in hand without further ado.
▪ The selection board interviewed him and rejected his application without further ado.
▪ Then, without more ado, he loaded the horses into the trailer.
▪ Then, without more ado, he turned on his heel and left, slamming the door behind him.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ In the far distance she could see the outlines of several tall buildings.
▪ We can walk if it's not far.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ On the far side of the village was a small water mill, probably used for grinding corn.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Far

Far \Far\, n. [See Farrow.] (Zo["o]l.) A young pig, or a litter of pigs.

Far

Far \Far\, a. [ Fartherand Farthestare used as the compar. and superl. of far, although they are corruptions arising from confusion with further and furthest. See Further.] [OE. fer, feor, AS. feor; akin to OS. fer, D. ver, OHG. ferro, adv., G. fern, a., Icel. fjarri, Dan. fjirn, Sw. fjerran, adv., Goth. fa[=i]rra, adv., Gr. ????? beyond, Skr. paras, adv., far, and prob. to L. per through, and E. prefix for-, as in forgive, and also to fare. Cf. Farther, Farthest.]

  1. Distant in any direction; not near; remote; mutually separated by a wide space or extent.

    They said, . . . We be come from a far country.
    --Josh. ix. 6.

    The nations far and near contend in choice.
    --Dryden.

  2. Remote from purpose; contrary to design or wishes; as, far be it from me to justify cruelty.

  3. Remote in affection or obedience; at a distance, morally or spiritually; t enmity with; alienated.

    They that are far from thee ahsll perish.
    --Ps. lxxiii. 27.

  4. Widely different in nature or quality; opposite in character.

    He was far from ill looking, though he thought himself still farther.
    --F. Anstey.

  5. The more distant of two; as, the far side (called also off side) of a horse, that is, the right side, or the one opposite to the rider when he mounts.

    Note: The distinction between the adjectival and adverbial use of far is sometimes not easily discriminated.

    By far, by much; by a great difference.

    Far between, with a long distance (of space or time) between; at long intervals. ``The examinations are few and far between.''
    --Farrar.

Far

Far \Far\, adv.

  1. To a great extent or distance of space; widely; as, we are separated far from each other.

  2. To a great distance in time from any point; remotely; as, he pushed his researches far into antiquity.

  3. In great part; as, the day is far spent.

  4. In a great proportion; by many degrees; very much; deeply; greatly. Who can find a virtuous woman ? for her price is far above rubies. --Prov. xxxi. 10. As far as, to the extent, or degree, that. See As far as, under As. Far off.

    1. At a great distance, absolutely or relatively.

    2. Distant in sympathy or affection; alienated. ``But now, in Christ Jesus, ye who some time were far off are made nigh by the blood of Christ.''
      --Eph. ii. 13.

      Far other, different by a great degree; not the same; quite unlike.
      --Pope.

      Far and near, at a distance and close by; throughout a whole region.

      Far and wide, distantly and broadly; comprehensively. ``Far and wide his eye commands.''
      --Milton.

      From far, from a great distance; from a remote place.

      Note: Far often occurs in self-explaining compounds, such as far-extended, far-reaching, far-spread.

Wikipedia

Far

Far or FAR may refer to:

Far (band)

Far was a band from Sacramento, California.

FAR (Tracteurs FAR)

FAR was a French truck manufacturer, affiliated with Chenard-Walcker.

It was founded in 1919 and ceased manufacture in 1970.

Far (album)

Far is the fifth studio album by American alternative singer-songwriter Regina Spektor, released in Europe through Sire Records on June 22, 2009 and North America on June 23, 2009 The album's first single, " Laughing With", was uploaded to Spektor's MySpace page on May 8 and was released as a digital download on May 18 in the United States and parts of Europe, along with the b-side "Blue Lips". Two viral videos for "Dance Anthem of the 80s" and " Eet" were also released on Spektor's MySpace account. The official music video for "Laughing With" was released on iTunes on May 26, 2009. A special edition of the album was released with two bonus tracks and a DVD, which included four music videos.

Spektor decided to work with multiple producers on the album. She has compared composing an album to taking a class, and as such, she wanted to have "multiple professors". She also felt the multiple producers would allow them not to worry what the single or big hit would be. The most notable producers include David Kahne, who produced her last album Begin to Hope, and Jeff Lynne, former member of Electric Light Orchestra and The Traveling Wilburys. Although Lynne has an expansive musical background, Spektor did not know of his work when she originally met him.

"Regina's songs are like literature," said Lynne, who doesn't usually work with new artists, but said that Spektor's demo tapes blew him away. "It hits you right in the face how brilliant it is," he said. Lynne produced four songs for the album.

WordNet

far

  1. adj. at a great distance in time or space or degree; "we come from a far country"; "far corners of the earth"; "the far future"; "a far journey"; "the far side of the road"; "far from the truth"; "far in the future" [ant: near]

  2. being of a considerable distance or length; "a far trek"

  3. being the animal or vehicle on the right or being on the right side of an animal or vehicle; "the horse on the right is the far horse"; "the right side is the far side of the horse"

  4. beyond a norm in opinion or actions; "the far right"

  5. [also: further, farther]

far

  1. adv. to a considerable degree; very much; "a far far better thing that I do"; "felt far worse than yesterday"; "eyes far too close together"

  2. at or to or from a great distance in space; "he traveled far"; "strayed far from home"; "sat far away from each other"

  3. at or to a certain point or degree; "I can only go so far before I have to give up"; "how far can we get with this kind of argument?"

  4. remote in time; "if we could see far into the future"; "all that happened far in the past"

  5. to an advanced stage or point; "a young man who will go very far"

  6. [also: further, farther]

Wiktionary

far

a. 1 Remote in space. 2 Remote in time. 3 Long. 4 More remote or longer of two. adv. 1 Distant in space, time or degree. 2 To or from a great distance, time, or degree. 3 (lb en with a comparative) Very much. n. 1 spelt (type of wheat). 2 A young pig, or a litter of pigs.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

far

Old English feorr "far, remote, distant" (cognates: Old Saxon fer, Old Frisian fer, Old Norse fjarre, Dutch ver, Old High German ferro, German fern), probably a development in western Proto-Germanic from the adverb (see far (adv.)). Far East "China, Japan, and surrounding regions" is from 1838.

far

Old English feor "to a great distance, long ago," from Proto-Germanic *ferro (cognates: Old Saxon fer, Old Frisian fir, Old Norse fiarre, Old High German fer, Gothic fairra), from PIE *per (1), base of words for "through, forward," with extended senses such as "across, beyond" (cognates: Sanskrit parah "farther, remote, ulterior," Hittite para "outside of," Greek pera "across, beyond," Latin per "through," Old Irish ire "farther"). Paired with wide since 9c.

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "far".

Most of all I trust to the generosity of the Hathors, who have abetted me so openly thus far.

So that meseems thou mayest abide here in a life far better than wandering amongst uncouth folk, perilous and cruel.

Leaving the cripple ablaze, settling, and pouring volcanic black smoke from the flammable cargo, he swung around in a long approach to what looked like a big troop Carrier, by far the fattest target in sight.

The beautifully rolled lawns and freshly painted club stand were sprinkled with spring dresses and abloom with sunshades, and coaches and other vehicles without number enclosed the farther side of the field.

But your far song, my faint one, what are they, And what their dance and faery thoughts and ours, Or night abloom with splendid stars and pale?

As these several abnormal conditions and diseases will be treated of elsewhere in this volume, we omit their further consideration here.

All the while the shaft of phosphorescence from the well was getting brighter and brighter, bringing to the minds of the huddled men, a sense of doom and abnormality which far outraced any image their conscious minds could form.

The scene I cannot describe--I should faint if I tried it, for there is madness in a room full of classified charnel things, with blood and lesser human debris almost ankle-deep on the slimy floor, and with hideous reptilian abnormalities sprouting, bubbling, and baking over a winking bluish-green spectre of dim flame in a far corner of black shadows.

The third and fourth humans on the island had tried to find their privacy as far from the abo village and the tunnel pool as possible.

The next morning he had her up at daybreak to see a school of jellyfish, the shiny, throbbing bodies abob in blue water as far as the lens of a telescope would encompass.

I fear we will be as far aneath the right medium for a while, as ye are startit aboon it.

Far aboon, ommost lost to mi view, Aw lang for a pair ov his wings, To fly wi him, an sing like him, too.

But to extend the hypothesis so far as to suppose that species, aboriginally as distinct as carriers, tumblers, pouters, and fantails now are, should yield offspring perfectly fertile, inter se, seems to me rash in the extreme.

But thus far there had been no other craft sighted on the waters, although smokes were visible from the many Aliansa village sites and a small group of aborigines was spied netting fish in the shallows.

The snowflakes had become fine and dry, almost like bits of ice, and they seemed to be abrading the world, smoothing it the way that sandpaper smoothed wood, until eventually there would be no peaks and valleys, nothing but a featureless, highly polished plain as far as anyone could see.