Find the word definition

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

exploit

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
exploit resources
▪ He exploited the mineral resources which he found under his lands.
exploit sb’s/sth’s potential (=use all the qualities that someone or something has)
▪ Until now, the island has not exploited its potential as a tourist destination.
use/exploit a loophole
▪ Airlines may be exploiting legal loopholes in order to employ pilots trained outside the US.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
fully
▪ Compiled annually, it is a voluminous source which can now be fully exploited for the first time using computer techniques.
▪ By fully exploiting their market position currently, monopolistic firms might elicit adverse public opinion and governmental censure.
▪ Currently, the recogniser does not fully exploit information about the physical properties of the input.
▪ The photographic record alone, indeed, has still to be exploited fully by historians.
▪ However this is not sufficient to ensure that the research potential of the data is fully exploited.
▪ Both sides shall give real substance to the agreement on the creation and work of cultural centres and fully exploit them.
▪ Doubtless there will be many highly strategic opportunities where this humiliation will be fully exploited.
▪ Whether managers fully exploit the pocket of discretion thus created depends on the intensity of their own commitment to profit maximisation.
successfully
▪ This might be successfully exploited by exploring the past from the viewpoint of the object under scrutiny.
▪ By looking like a super-offspring, the cuckoo successfully exploits the normal pattern of interaction that exists between parent and young.
■ NOUN
advantage
▪ This is something which human beings exploit to their advantage.
▪ This increased exposure allows them to exploit their advantages over more ordinary mortals more easily than their predecessors could.
▪ Second, they may wish to exploit advantages of scale.
▪ Loopholes, omissions or ambiguities should not be exploited to gain an advantage incompatible with the effective control of risk.
company
▪ The multinational drug companies are often exploiting that knowledge in their constant search for new and more profitable drugs.
▪ Meanwhile the pharmaceutical companies exploit the beekeepers, who depend on them to control the mites.
▪ However, no decision has yet been taken on how the company will exploit its investment.
▪ And so, an Arizona-based company exploited that loophole, sending countless faxes to unsuspecting Californians.
▪ Now, plans are being made cheaper and easier, allowing mutual fund companies to exploit this previously unattractive market.
fact
▪ Bigamous males simply exploit the fact that females are in a hurry.
▪ He knows that he is not obliged to be polite, and he exploits this fact.
information
▪ Currently, the recogniser does not fully exploit information about the physical properties of the input.
▪ Because of this increase in transactions costs, the profits from exploiting company-specific information in the stock market decline.
▪ The competitive process arises out of disequilibrium in markets giving opportunities for entrepreneurs to exploit their superior information and earn profits.
issue
▪ Clinton, 49, has not sought directly to exploit the age issue in the fall campaign.
▪ Republicans accused him of exploiting the issue for political purposes.
loophole
▪ Those people are not exploiting a loophole or grabbing at a large pot of gold.
▪ And so, an Arizona-based company exploited that loophole, sending countless faxes to unsuspecting Californians.
▪ The worm exploits three security loopholes in the systems to gain root access to the server and make changes to the system.
▪ Simply hoping that governments will not exploit loopholes is stupid.
▪ Other private placements are designed mainly for issuers, often to exploit tax loopholes.
market
▪ By fully exploiting their market position currently, monopolistic firms might elicit adverse public opinion and governmental censure.
▪ We must continue to build on our strengths, and exploit the markets where they give us an edge.
▪ The Midland, however, cannily saw the profit to be made from exploiting the potential mass market and led the way.
▪ Now, plans are being made cheaper and easier, allowing mutual fund companies to exploit this previously unattractive market.
▪ The Group continues to have a strong balance sheet and is ideally placed to exploit market opportunities in 1993 and beyond.
opportunity
▪ Such a state of affairs provides the seller with a unique opportunity to exploit the relatively weak bargaining position of the investor.
▪ To take inherent advantages, every civilization is born of immediate opportunities, rapidly exploited.
▪ David Prosser reports Gordon Brown's Budget last month gave expatriate savers and investors several opportunities to exploit.
▪ This would not please traders, who would lose opportunities to exploit the inefficiencies of the market as it is now constituted.
▪ The learner is allocated to the ward for such a short period that every learning opportunity must be exploited to the full.
▪ A peculiar habit, or a novel structure, opens a world of opportunity that can be exploited in a myriad ways.
▪ The competitive process arises out of disequilibrium in markets giving opportunities for entrepreneurs to exploit their superior information and earn profits.
position
▪ The privatised boards have given themselves an inbuilt incentive to exploit their monopoly position.
▪ By fully exploiting their market position currently, monopolistic firms might elicit adverse public opinion and governmental censure.
▪ There is never the feeling that in any way she is exploiting her position for her own good.
▪ Not getting up was his way of exploiting his position.
▪ It seemed to him quite possible that Dysart should exploit his official position to save an old friend from bankruptcy.
▪ Those filtering the information have also frequently exploited their position to select and control the flow for their own purposes.
▪ Many managerial positions involve the employee being both a representative of the capitalist and a worker who is in some degree exploited.
possibility
▪ Inevitably, composers have been quick to exploit percussion possibilities, and if anything we have suffered a period of over-use.
▪ Cinema directors have long exploited the expressive possibilities of the wide-angled lens.
▪ Planned towns were deliberate attempts to exploit the economic possibilities of a site; and like any other investment could go wrong.
potential
▪ The House of Andreeyev had purchased the right to exploit the commercial potential of the Manchu system.
▪ Man was able to exploit the potential of music only when he started writing musical scores.
▪ Still, Anixter has only begun to exploit its potential.
▪ Teaching strategies need to adapt to this new situation, to exploit the potential offered by computers.
▪ This positions them uniquely in exploiting the multimedia potential of their list.
▪ Two criticisms are frequently made of it: it is boring and it doesn't exploit the full potential of the medium.
power
▪ Those who exploited the potential power of the new instrument were recommended a Walter piano, which had a check.
▪ We can exploit video's power to present vividly situations which are unfamiliar or inaccessible to us.
situation
▪ Over many years in California they had acquired the know-how required to exploit a weak party situation.
▪ He also saw that the Communist powers were themselves divided and that diplomacy might be used to exploit this situation.
▪ Later bravado runs high to disguise their feelings and some of them exploit the situation for gain.
▪ At the same time they also exploited the current political situation for their own ends.
▪ If there were social unrest, a number of people would attempt to exploit the situation for their own ends.
▪ It wishes to exploit this situation in order to raise interest rates.
system
▪ She was trapped with a sexist employer who exploited a sexist legal system.
▪ Devi nevertheless exploits the existing system to help the underprivileged who come to her for help.
▪ Hanson skilfully exploited the system of proportional representation, which asks voters to list candidates in order of preference.
▪ Are women being exploited by a system which sees them as easy targets?
▪ She hopes to exploit the preferential voting system in the federal elections to unseat the ruling coalition.
technology
▪ Baker also plans schemes that help industry to exploit technologies developed by universities.
▪ The suit also poisoned potential investors against Addamax which needed more money to exploit its technology, he said.
▪ Perhaps still more impressive is Corning's record in exploiting its technology through joint ventures, a notoriously difficult form of business.
▪ In addition more and more departments are exploiting the new technology in their teaching.
weakness
▪ Our sinister cop is able to exploit that weakness by offering a sympathetic ear.
▪ This short-term outlook enables them to exploit the weakness of their customers without worrying about the long-term effects on customer relations.
▪ Successive governments have exploited our weakness for anything tax-free with a series of investment schemes.
worker
▪ Thus the capitalists have economic power, controlling and exploiting the worker, and this also gives them political power as well.
▪ I explain that a lower price will exploit my workers.
■ VERB
fail
▪ No decision made will fail to be carried out, and no opportunity will fail to be exploited.
▪ Anyway, he did not fail to exploit his exalted status.
▪ His incompetence was further shown up last year when he failed to exploit the break-up of the rebel movement into three factions.
▪ He charges firstly that the present techniques fail to exploit the opportunity which interactive computing can offer.
hope
▪ The Commonwealth of Independent States unit also hopes to exploit the need for new or additional CAD/CAM systems and software.
▪ He also hopes to exploit the Burke's name by reproducing it on the labels of clarets, burgundies and champagnes.
▪ The second-tier agencies hope to exploit these feelings.
▪ She hopes to exploit the preferential voting system in the federal elections to unseat the ruling coalition.
seek
▪ Clinton, 49, has not sought directly to exploit the age issue in the fall campaign.
try
▪ Rohan had tried to exploit her cynically for his own gain.
▪ On the other side, among those trying to exploit these revelations, there is almost an equal disingenuousness.
▪ Newcomen came up against Savery's work when he tried to exploit his steam engines.
▪ Fear, indeed, appears to be growing that extremists may well try to exploit public discontent.
▪ They therefore submitted nasty strategies, trying to exploit these anticipated softies!
▪ Branson would momentarily drop his guard, and McLaren would immediately try to exploit it.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Britain consistently fails to exploit the scientific discoveries made in its universities.
▪ Christmas has been exploited for commercial reasons.
▪ loan sharks who exploit the poor by charging up to 1000% interest per year.
▪ Many 'New Age' therapists simply exploit the hopes and fears of sick people who would be better off going to their own doctor.
▪ Many employers are only too ready to exploit and underpay female part-time workers.
▪ Measure are being taken to stop employment agencies exploiting foreign workers desperate to find a job.
▪ Opposition leaders were quick to exploit government embarrassment over the incident.
▪ Peasants in remote areas of the country were being shamelessly exploited by wealthy land owners.
▪ The country's natural resources have not yet been fully exploited.
▪ The country could exploit its position as a major oil producer to push up world oil prices.
▪ The factory's largely Hispanic workforce is underpaid and exploited.
▪ We need to do a better job of exploiting our natural resources.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Maybe the firms exploited women employees or relied on child labor.
▪ Priests were not always above exploiting the fear.
▪ Second, they may wish to exploit advantages of scale.
▪ The core material covers the syllabus in depth, and can be exploited in different ways with different types of class.
▪ These ironworks were built in 173 6 and were worked for 130 years, exploiting local iron ore deposits.
▪ Those filtering the information have also frequently exploited their position to select and control the flow for their own purposes.
II.noun
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Kids will love these stories about Annie Oakley's exploits.
▪ protests against the exploitation of children in the clothing industry
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But those in favour of the second chamber say it will survive Jamie's exploits.
▪ Many script kiddies are quickly caught, often because they boast of their hacking exploits or are betrayed by their internet names.
▪ Peden was not armed and did not take part in the band's less reputable exploits.
▪ Perhaps Louis was also stung by the threatened negation of his own youthful exploits on the March.
▪ Tales of Stan's exploits are legendary.
▪ This was not his last military exploit, however.
▪ To mention Kaptan was to devalue the exploit.
Wikipedia

Exploit (computer security)

An exploit (from the English verb to exploit, meaning "using something to one’s own advantage") is a piece of software, a chunk of data, or a sequence of commands that takes advantage of a bug or vulnerability in order to cause unintended or unanticipated behavior to occur on computer software, hardware, or something electronic (usually computerized). Such behavior frequently includes things like gaining control of a computer system, allowing privilege escalation, or a denial-of-service attack.

Exploit

Exploit means to take advantage of something (a person, situation, etc.) for one's own end, especially unethically or unjustifiably.

Exploit can mean:

  • Exploit (computer security)
  • Exploit (video gaming)
  • Exploit (natural resources)
  • Exploit (sociology)
  • Exploit, a 2009 Adobe Flash game by Gregory Weir
  • The Exploits River, the longest river on the island of Newfoundland

Exploit (video gaming)

In video games, an exploit is the use of a bug or glitches, game system, rates, hit boxes, or speed, etc. by a player to their advantage in a manner not intended by the game's designers. Exploits have been classified as a form of cheating; however, the precise determination of what is or is not considered an exploit can be controversial. This debate stems from a number of factors but typically involves the argument that the issues are part of the game and require no changes or external programs to take advantage of them.

Exploit (video game)

For the general meaning of the term "exploit" in video games, see Exploit (video gaming)

Exploit is a Flash browser game by Gregory Weir. It was published in December 2008. As of October 2011, Exploit has been played over 700,000 times.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Exploit

Exploit \Ex*ploit"\, n. [OE. esploit success, OF. esploit, espleit,revenue, product, vigor, force, exploit, F. exploit exploit, fr. L. explicitum, prop. p. p. neut. of explicare to unfold, display, exhibit; ex + plicare to fold. See Ply, and cf. Explicit, Explicate.]

  1. A deed or act; especially, a heroic act; a deed of renown; an adventurous or noble achievement; as, the exploits of Alexander the Great.

    Ripe for exploits and mighty enterprises.
    --Shak.

  2. Combat; war. [Obs.]

    He made haste to exploit some warlike service.
    --Holland.

    2. [F. exploiter.] To utilize; to make available; to get the value or usefulness out of; as, to exploit a mine or agricultural lands; to exploit public opinion. [Recent]

  3. Hence: To draw an illegitimate profit from; to speculate on; to put upon. [Recent]

    In no sense whatever does a man who accumulates a fortune by legitimate industry exploit his employ['e]s or make his capital ``out of'' anybody else.
    --W. G. Sumner.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

exploit

late 14c., "outcome of an action," from Old French esploit "a carrying out; achievement, result; gain, advantage" (12c., Modern French exploit), a very common word, used in senses of "action, deed, profit, achievement," from Latin explicitum "a thing settled, ended, or displayed," noun use of neuter of explicitus, past participle of explicare "unfold, unroll, disentangle" (see explicit).\n

\nMeaning "feat, achievement" is c.1400. Sense evolution is from "unfolding" to "bringing out" to "having advantage" to "achievement." Related: Exploits.

exploit

c.1400, espleiten, esploiten "to accomplish, achieve, fulfill," from Old French esploitier, espleiter "carry out, perform, accomplish," from esploit (see exploit (n.)). The sense of "use selfishly" first recorded 1838, from a sense development in French perhaps from use of the word with reference to mines, etc. (compare exploitation). Related: Exploited; exploiting.

WordNet

exploit

  1. n. a notable achievement; "he performed a great deed"; "the book was her finest effort" [syn: deed, feat, effort]

  2. v. use or manipulate to one's advantage; "He exploit the new taxation system"; "She knows how to work the system"; "he works his parents for sympathy" [syn: work]

  3. draw from; make good use of; "we must exploit the resources we are given wisely" [syn: tap]

  4. work excessively hard; "he is exploiting the students" [syn: overwork]

Wiktionary

exploit

n. 1 A heroic or extraordinary deed. 2 An achievement. 3 (context computing English) A program or technique that exploits a vulnerability in other software. vb. (context transitive English) To use for one’s own advantage.

Usage examples of "exploit".

An influx of gangsters looking to exploit Prohibition became affiliated with the Purples.

The young man told him the various antipathy stories, about the evil-eye hypothesis, about his horse-taming exploits, his rescuing the student whose boat was overturned, and every occurrence he could recall which would help out the effect of his narrative.

Even the Chinese antipodists seemed to realize the importance of this occasion, and did upside-down exploits more impossible-seeming than any they had ever done before.

He applied his beguiling enticements with the crafty art of a true philanderer and boldly advanced his exploits with unmitigated verve.

If we want to make more than just small quantities of borosilicate laboratory glassware, we will want to exploit nearer sources.

Miss Baker-Sneed was not only a forward woman willing to brangle over a few guineas, but she had a rare talent for ascertaining value, and the wit to exploit that ability.

Storytelling, Brewster soon discovered, was by far the most popular form of entertainment, and most of these stories were built around the actual experiences and exploits of the storyteller, usually embellished considerably for dramatic effect.

Such was the demand for his Vitebsk theme, and the ruthlessness with which Chagall exploited it, that critics accused him of merchandizing his own exotica as art.

But it would be a crass mistake to dismiss him as merely a lightweight, recklessly exploiting the financial crisis for short-term advantage.

This incrimination by association was to be a standard tool of opposition groups exploiting the public need for villains on whom whatever disaster was in the offing could be blamed.

Republic, upon the ruins of the predatory monarchy of their exploiting and land-monopolizing rulers.

He already thinks I wrote that vulgar grotesque perversion he saw up there on the screen now when he reads this, if he had any doubts and he reads this where they say I wrote the original script for this spectacularly successful motion picture exploiting madness in the family did you see that?

Father got up and walked out after that great battle scene when that ghostly spectre appeared standing there brooding over those two corpses in the Bloody Lane that was supposed to be Grandfather and when I said maybe that was why Father was upset with me for exploiting the family and Grandfather if he thought I wrote the script like it said in the newspaper and I asked him to read my last act he said he.

But the internal tension created by petty-stateism was generating a centrifugal tendency within the European Empire, and extra-European forces were exploiting this tendency.

He would be first and foremost a human predator, a born manipulator who would get by in life by exploiting people and systems.