Find the word definition

Crossword clues for even

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
even
I.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a fine day/morning/evening
a fun day/evening etc
a morning/afternoon/evening shift
▪ All the machines are cleaned at the end of every afternoon shift.
a summer's day/evening (also a summer day/evening)
▪ It was a beautiful summer's day.
an even number (=2, 4, 6, 8 etc)
▪ All even numbers can be divided by 2.
an evening bag (=a small bag that a woman takes out with her in the evening)
▪ She put her lipstick in a black velvet evening bag.
an evening breeze
▪ People were out walking, enjoying the evening breeze.
an evening class
▪ Mum goes to an evening class on Tuesdays.
an evening dress (=a formal dress to wear in the evening)
▪ She arrived in a red evening dress.
an evening paper
▪ Ian usually buys an evening paper on his way home.
an evening/midday meal
▪ The evening meal is served at 7.30.
better still/even better
▪ It was even better than last year.
chilly day/night/evening etc
▪ a chilly November morning
early in the morning/afternoon/evening
▪ We set off early in the morning.
early morning/afternoon/evening
▪ The lake looked beautiful in the pale early morning light.
even though
▪ Pascal went ahead with the experiment even though he knew it was dangerous.
even worse
▪ My cooking’s even worse than yours.
even (=all of the same height )
▪ His teeth were white and even.
even/equalBritish English (= one in which everyone has the same chance of winning)
▪ One of the men was much older so it was hardly an even contest.
evening class
evening clothes
▪ I don’t often have a chance to wear formal evening clothes.
evening dress
evening primrose
evening wearformal (= clothes worn to formal events in the evening)
▪ The band were dressed in evening wear.
good evening
in the cool of the evening
▪ They went for a stroll in the cool of the evening.
keep sth/get sth back on an even keel
▪ Now that the crisis is over, we must try to get things back on an even keel.
maybe even
▪ You have talent, maybe even genius.
morning/afternoon/evening calm
▪ A scream shattered the late afternoon calm.
morning/evening/midnight etc Mass
▪ Will I see you at morning Mass?
or, even worse
▪ The business could become less profitable or, even worse, could close down.
the morning/afternoon/evening sun
▪ We ate breakfast outside in the gentle morning sun.
the morning/afternoon/evening sunlight
▪ Their armour glinted in the early morning sunlight.
the morning/afternoon/evening sunshine
▪ The morning sunshine brightened the room.
the morning/evening mist
▪ The sun broke through the morning mist.
the morning/evening/night air
▪ He stepped out and breathed in the cold morning air.
the night/evening/morning sky
▪ The moon is the brightest object visible in the night sky.
wedding/evening/ball gown
▪ a white silk wedding gown
yesterday morning/afternoon/evening
▪ Anna left yesterday afternoon.
‘Don’t even go there!’
▪ ‘What if the two of them ...?’ ‘Don’t even go there!’
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(even) if it kills me
▪ I'm going to finish this even if it kills me.
call it/things even
▪ Since you bought the movie tickets and I bought dinner, let's just call it even.
even if
▪ Athletes are a mirror of society, even if sometimes their images are blown out of proportion.
▪ But even if that is the case, you might be well ahead by taking the loan.
▪ Can educators regulate the contents of school-sponsored publications or plays even if they do not cause disruption?
▪ He later said he had been prepared to go ahead with the attack even if it led to war.
▪ In such a revolution, even if it is bloodless, complete justice can never be attained.
▪ It is still rationalized by an elaborate and traditional, even if meretricious, theory of consumer demand.
▪ Scars Of Sweet Paradise is worth reading as a slice of cultural history, even if one has no interest in Joplin.
good evening
▪ A bad morning, a good afternoon and - perhaps - an even better evening.
▪ A policeman walked by, wished me good evening and ushered a warning.
▪ Ah, good evening, Lestrade!
▪ Behind the glass I see her tell everyone good evening.
▪ But for now from all the team, have a very good evening.
▪ Dearest Timothy: It is a good evening to sit in this pleasant room and write a letter.
▪ Have a good evening. 1904 How can you, you have class tomorrow night?
▪ We exchange slightly embarrassed good evenings with them as we leave.
make a day/night/evening of it
▪ Why don't you make a day of it and have lunch with us?
▪ I had known Sophie for about three months by then, and she insisted on making an evening of it.
▪ Imagine how lovely it would be - you could take the whole family and make a day of it.
▪ They make a day of it, tailgating before the game and, weather permitting, after it, too.
not (even) blink
▪ Residents didn't even blink when the chemicals company set up business in town.
▪ And yet Stillman had not even blinked.
▪ But in the stagecraft of dethronement, Kingsley had not taken the bait, had not even blinked.
▪ I hold my finger in front of her nose; still she does not blink.
▪ It seems to us so extraordinary, yet the storyteller does not blink an eyelid.
▪ Mine felt as if they had not blinked for hours.
▪ She found that she could not even blink under the harsh glare.
▪ We found the village easily enough, though anyone travelling in the area in a Porsche had better not blink.
▪ What if Khrushchev had not blinked?
of an evening/of a weekend etc
on an even keel
▪ Confusion seems to reign in many areas of your life at present, so try to get on an even keel.
▪ I was supposed to be a caretaker, charged with setting the branch back on an even keel.
▪ In Chapter 11, companies' management usually remains in place while the company tries to get back on an even keel.
▪ So when we got up here, I was really enjoying sort of keeping things on an even keel at home.
▪ That Nigel was on an even keel again was a double comfort.
▪ Then maybe they are on an even keel.
▪ These two kept her on an even keel.
the honours are even
the still of the night/evening etc
▪ No longer are her anxious snorts heard in the still of the night.
while away the hours/evening/days etc
▪ Let's while away the hours swapping stories.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Even Al was bored with the game, and he loves baseball.
▪ I can't believe that Carrie doesn't even like cookies.
▪ Molly looked depressed, even suicidal.
▪ The bride looked beautiful -- radiant, even.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And sometimes, he even toys with his long-running fantasy of dropping out of the business and becoming a film director.
▪ As a result of her actions, Amelia became even more popular and within a short time was practically running Ogontz.
▪ But even he had underestimated the king's nerve.
▪ His sister Mary helped him with the costumes, but he furnished the rich falsetto, routinely deceiving even his friends.
▪ Such an exercise might even spread over two or three terms.
▪ With Thabet's death, even the political leaders of Fatah have become potential prey.
▪ Zeus, who loved him no more than Hera did even though he was their son, willingly gave her leave.
II.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
chance
▪ There is a suggestion that offspring do not have an even chance of inheriting a trait from either parent.
▪ There was always better than an even chance of something like this happening.
▪ All three machines have a better than even chance of being seen in showrooms some time in the future.
distribution
▪ Why is there not a more even distribution of left-and right-handed folk?
▪ Slant wall: filling is in slanted sections giving more even distribution.
▪ An even distribution has an added advantage, the institution will be better able to cope with the Unpredictable.
keel
▪ Confusion seems to reign in many areas of your life at present, so try to get on an even keel.
▪ So when we got up here, I was really enjoying sort of keeping things on an even keel at home.
▪ Others may yearn for life on a more even keel but they do not feel entitled to it.
▪ I was supposed to be a caretaker, charged with setting the branch back on an even keel.
▪ That Nigel was on an even keel again was a double comfort.
▪ In Chapter 11, companies' management usually remains in place while the company tries to get back on an even keel.
▪ By the time the taxi had delivered them to the restaurant Fabia was feeling on more of an even keel.
▪ Then maybe they are on an even keel.
number
▪ With this, we can easily flip any even number of edges, which we will see is all that is possible.
▪ On one side of Color Bars the shades are marked with even numbers.
▪ Knit an even number of rows without weaving before knitting another two-row woven stripe.
▪ On early levels shapes are present in even numbers, but this is not the case later on.
▪ It also assumes that there is an even number of coupon payment dates remaining before maturity.
▪ Although this would give an even number of staff available, other factors must be considered.
▪ Similarly a family of vertical parabolas is of the form y ax n, where n is an even number.
▪ Motors with even numbers of phases must have half of the phases excited at any time.
tooth
▪ She had pale crimped hair over her temples, and her lips were parted to reveal large, even teeth.
▪ It was a dead seal with light tan fur, open eyes, and a set of small, even teeth.
▪ She had perfectly proportioned features and perfectly proportioned hands and feet and small even teeth that flashed as she smiled.
▪ His even teeth gleamed falsely, vividly in the intense sunlight.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ After driving for so long on the gravel I was glad to get on an even stretch of road.
▪ an even rhythm
▪ an even row of telephone poles
▪ an even stretch of road
▪ Make sure the floor is even before you lay the carpet.
▪ Our grocery bill came to an even $30.00.
▪ Shape the dough into eight even balls.
▪ These chemicals must be stored at an even temperature.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ I was supposed to be a caretaker, charged with setting the branch back on an even keel.
▪ Loopy Lil gently smiled her new even welfare smile while Mrs Hollidaye darned lisle stockings.
III.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
even if
▪ Athletes are a mirror of society, even if sometimes their images are blown out of proportion.
▪ But even if that is the case, you might be well ahead by taking the loan.
▪ Can educators regulate the contents of school-sponsored publications or plays even if they do not cause disruption?
▪ He later said he had been prepared to go ahead with the attack even if it led to war.
▪ In such a revolution, even if it is bloodless, complete justice can never be attained.
▪ It is still rationalized by an elaborate and traditional, even if meretricious, theory of consumer demand.
▪ Scars Of Sweet Paradise is worth reading as a slice of cultural history, even if one has no interest in Joplin.
good evening
▪ A bad morning, a good afternoon and - perhaps - an even better evening.
▪ A policeman walked by, wished me good evening and ushered a warning.
▪ Ah, good evening, Lestrade!
▪ Behind the glass I see her tell everyone good evening.
▪ But for now from all the team, have a very good evening.
▪ Dearest Timothy: It is a good evening to sit in this pleasant room and write a letter.
▪ Have a good evening. 1904 How can you, you have class tomorrow night?
▪ We exchange slightly embarrassed good evenings with them as we leave.
of an evening/of a weekend etc
on an even keel
▪ Confusion seems to reign in many areas of your life at present, so try to get on an even keel.
▪ I was supposed to be a caretaker, charged with setting the branch back on an even keel.
▪ In Chapter 11, companies' management usually remains in place while the company tries to get back on an even keel.
▪ So when we got up here, I was really enjoying sort of keeping things on an even keel at home.
▪ That Nigel was on an even keel again was a double comfort.
▪ Then maybe they are on an even keel.
▪ These two kept her on an even keel.
the honours are even
the still of the night/evening etc
▪ No longer are her anxious snorts heard in the still of the night.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Even

Even \E"ven\, a. [AS. efen. efn; akin to OS. eban, D. even, OHG. eban, G. efen, Icel. jafn, Dan. jevn, Sw. j["a]mn, Goth. ibns. Cf. Anent, Ebb.]

  1. Level, smooth, or equal in surface; not rough; free from irregularities; hence uniform in rate of motion of action; as, even ground; an even speed; an even course of conduct.

  2. Equable; not easily ruffled or disturbed; calm; uniformly self-possessed; as, an even temper.

  3. Parallel; on a level; reaching the same limit.

    And shall lay thee even with the ground.
    --Luke xix. 4

  4. 4. Balanced; adjusted; fair; equitable; impartial; just to both sides; owing nothing on either side; -- said of accounts, bargains, or persons indebted; as, our accounts are even; an even bargain.

    To make the even truth in pleasure flow.
    --Shak.

  5. Without an irregularity, flaw, or blemish; pure. ``I know my life so even.''
    --Shak.

  6. Associate; fellow; of the same condition. [Obs.] ``His even servant.''
    --Wyclif (Matt. xviii. 29).

  7. Not odd; capable of division by two without a remainder; -- said of numbers; as, 4 and 10 are even numbers.

    Whether the number of the stars is even or odd.
    --Jer. Taylor.

    On even ground, with equal advantage.

    On even keel (Naut.), in a level or horizontal position.

Even

Even \E"ven\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Evened; p. pr. & vb. n. Evening]

  1. To make even or level; to level; to lay smooth.

    His temple Xerxes evened with the soil.
    --Sir. W. Raleigh.

    It will even all inequalities
    --Evelyn.

  2. To equal. [Obs.] ``To even him in valor.''
    --Fuller.

  3. To place in an equal state, as to obligation, or in a state in which nothing is due on either side; to balance, as accounts; to make quits; to make equal; as, to even the score.
    --Shak.

  4. To set right; to complete.

  5. To act up to; to keep pace with.
    --Shak.

Even

Even \E"ven\, v. i. To be equal. [Obs.]
--R. Carew.

Even

Even \E"ven\ ([=e]v"'n) n. [OE. eve, even, efen, [ae]fen. AS. [=ae]fen; akin to OS. [=a]band, OFries, [=a]vend, D. avond, OHG. [=a]band, Icel. aptan, Sw. afton, Dan. aften; of unknown origin. Cf. Eve, Evening.] Evening. See Eve, n. 1. [Poetic.]
--Shak.

Even

Even \E"ven\, adv. [AS. efne. See Even, a., and cf. E'en.]

  1. In an equal or precisely similar manner; equally; precisely; just; likewise; as well. ``Is it even so?''
    --Shak.

    Even so did these Gauls possess the coast.
    --Spenser.

  2. Up to, or down to, an unusual measure or level; so much as; fully; quite.

    Thou wast a soldier Even to Cato's wish.
    --Shak.

    Without . . . making us even sensible of the change.
    --Swift.

  3. As might not be expected; -- serving to introduce what is unexpected or less expected.

    I have made several discoveries, which appear new, even to those who are versed in critical learning.
    --Addison.

  4. At the very time; in the very case.

    I knew they were bad enough to please, even when I wrote them.
    --Dryden.

    Note: Even is sometimes used to emphasize a word or phrase. ``I have debated even in my soul.''
    --Shak.

    By these presence, even the presence of Lord Mortimer.
    --Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
even

Old English efnan "to make even, to make level; liken, compare" (see even (adj.)). Intransitive sense of "become even" is attested from early 13c. Related: Evened; evening.

even

"end of the day," Old English æfen, Mercian efen, Northumbrian efern (see eve).

even

Old English efen "level," also "equal, like; calm, harmonious; equally; quite, fully; namely," from Proto-Germanic *ebnaz (cognates: Old Saxon eban, Old Frisian even "level, plain, smooth," Dutch even, Old High German eban, German eben, Old Norse jafn, Danish jævn, Gothic ibns). The adverb is Old English efne "exactly, just, likewise." Modern adverbial sense (introducing an extreme case of something more generally implied) seems to have arisen 16c. from use of the word to emphasize identity ("Who, me?" "Even you").\n

\nEtymologists are uncertain whether the original sense was "level" or "alike." Used extensively in Old English compounds, with a sense of "fellow, co-" (as in efeneald "of the same age;" Middle English even-sucker "foster-brother"). Of numbers, from 1550s. Sense of "on an equal footing" is from 1630s. Rhyming reduplication phrase even steven is attested from 1866; even break (n.) first recorded 1907. Even-tempered from 1712. To get even with "retaliate upon" is attested by 1833.

Wiktionary
even

Etymology 1

  1. 1 flat and level. 2 Without great variation. 3 equal in proportion, quantity, size(,) etc. 4 (context not comparable of an integer English) divisible by two. 5 (context of a number English) Convenient for round#Verbing other numbers to; for example, ending in a zero. 6 On equal monetary terms; neither owing or being owed. 7 (context colloquial English) On equal terms of a moral sort; quits. 8 parallel; on a level; reaching the same limit 9 (context obsolete English) Without an irregularity, flaw, or blemish; pure. 10 (context obsolete English) Associate; fellow; of the same condition. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To make flat and level. 2 (context transitive obsolete English) To equal. 3 (context intransitive obsolete English) To be equal. 4 (context transitive obsolete English) To place in an equal state, as to obligation, or in a state in which nothing is due on either side; to balance, as accounts; to make quits. 5 (context transitive obsolete English) To set right; to complete. 6 (context transitive obsolete English) To act up to; to keep pace with. Etymology 2

    adv. 1 (lb en archaic) exactly, just, fully. 2 (non-gloss definition: Implying an extreme example in the case mentioned, as compared to the implied reality.) Etymology 3

    n. (context archaic or poetic English) evening.

WordNet
even
  1. adv. used as an intensive especially to indicate something unexpected; "even an idiot knows that"; "declined even to consider the idea"; "I don't have even a dollar!"

  2. in spite of; notwithstanding; "even when he is sick, he works"; "even with his head start she caught up with him"

  3. to a greater degree or extent; used with comparisons; "looked sick and felt even worse"; "an even (or still) more interesting problem"; "still another problem must be solved"; "a yet sadder tale" [syn: yet, still]

  4. to the full extent; "loyal even unto death"

even
  1. v. make level or straight; "level the ground" [syn: flush, level, even out]

  2. become even or more even; "even out the surface" [syn: even out]

  3. make even or more even [syn: even out]

even
  1. adj. divisible by two [ant: odd]

  2. equal in degree or extent or amount; or equally matched or balanced; "even amounts of butter and sugar"; "on even terms"; "it was a fifty-fifty (or even) split"; "had a fifty-fifty (or even) chance"; "an even fight" [syn: fifty-fifty]

  3. being level or straight or regular and without variation as e.g. in shape or texture; or being in the same plane or at the same height as something else (i.e. even with); "an even application of varnish"; "an even floor"; "the road was not very even"; "the picture is even with the window" [ant: uneven]

  4. symmetrically arranged; "even features"; "regular features"; "a regular polygon" [syn: regular]

  5. occurring at fixed intervals; "a regular beat"; "the even rhythm of his breathing" [syn: regular]

  6. of the score in a contest; "the score is tied" [syn: tied(p), level(p)]

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
Even

Even may refer to:

Even (surname)

Even is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Maya Even (born 1958), Canadian born British based university lecturer, journalist and television presenter
  • Pierre Even (composer) (born 1946), Luxembourgian composer
  • Pierre Even (producer), Canadian film producer
  • Pierre Even (cyclist), French cyclist
  • Shimon Even (1935–2004), Israeli computer science researcher
  • Uzi Even (born 1940), Israeli professor of chemistry as well as a politician
Even (band)

Even are an Australian indie rock three-piece fronted by singer-songwriter-guitarist, Ash Naylor, with Matthew Cotter on drums and Wally Kempton (also known as Wally Meanie) on bass guitar and backing vocals. They formed in March 1994 and played regularly around the live music scene and toured both nationally and internationally. They have released six studio albums, Less Is More (10 June 1996), Come Again (28 September 1998), A Different High (14 May 2001), Free Kicks (6 June 2004), Even (29 March 2008) and In Another Time (9 December 2011). A Different High peaked at No. 48 on the ARIA Albums Chart.

Even (given name)

Even is a Norwegian given name coming from Old NorseEivindr (existing as Eivindur in Iceland). Another common name derived from Old Norse Eivindr is the Norwegianized Eivind. Eivind, and variants such as Øyvind, are products of the "name renaissance" in Norway, where in the 1800s Old Norse names were plucked from historical sources and given a Norwegianized spelling, cf. Sigurd from Old Norse Sigurðr.

It can be theorized that the name has its origin in the Proto-Norse roots (*auja-, *-winduR) held to mean 'gift' and 'winner', respectively. Even is a somewhat common name in Norway. Notable people with the name include:

  • Even Benestad, documentary film director
  • Even Erlien, politician
  • Even Hansen, civil servant and politician
  • Even Hammer Holmboe, politician
  • Even Johansen, musician
  • Even Lange, economic historian
  • Even Pellerud, football player and coach
  • Even Stormoen, actor
  • Even Wetten, speed skater
Even (company)

Even is a Brazilian construction and real estate company. It is listed on BM&F Bovespa, the São Paulo Stock Exchange.

Even has operated in the real estate sector for more than 40 years and is one of the largest developers and builders in the São Paulo metropolitan area. The Company maintains a strategic focus on the cities of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Porto Alegre.

The Company has vertically integrated operations, executing all the development stages of its projects, from site prospecting, property development and brokerage activities to the project‘s construction. Even also have two brokerage companies: Even Vendas and Even More, both of which operate in 100% of the Company‘s projects selling units and providing services exclusively for Even.

Major competitors include Cyrela Brazil Realty, Gafisa, Rossi Residencial, PDG Realty, Brookfield Incorporações, and MRV Engenharia.

Usage examples of "even".

In their aberration they believed it was worth their while to break all the barriers of perception, even if they had to become trees to do that.

Kuhmbuhluhners on their big horses, aided and abetted, if the tales of the fugitives were to be believed, by bearded Ahrmehnee warriors and even Moon Maidens.

Even the Templars and the Hospitallers were divided, and the Italian merchant princes abetted one faction or the other as their own interests decreed.

He had figured to himself some passionate hysterique, merciless as a cat in her hate and her love, a zealous abettor, perhaps even the ruling spirit in the crime.

For if so be it doth not, then may ye all abide at home, and eat of my meat, and drink of my cup, but little chided either for sloth or misdoing, even as it hath been aforetime.

Nicholas, hear of me therein, they must even let me alone to abide here.

But now hold up thine heart, and keep close for these two days that we shall yet abide in Tower Dale: and trust me this very evening I shall begin to set tidings going that shall work and grow, and shall one day rejoice thine heart.

Not even down-to-earth, no-dancer-on-earth-could-interest-me, Abie Singleton.

I have no ability to do that, not even with you enhancing his emotions for me.

For if invocations, conjurations, fumigations and adorations are used, then an open pact is formed with the devil, even if there has been no surrender of body and soul together with explicit abjuration of the Faith either wholly or in part.

Carthage, who was invested with civil and military power, provoked the sectaries, and even the Catholics of the Roman province, to abjure the religion as well as the authority of their tyrants.

The candidate who aspired to the virtue of evangelical poverty, abjured, at his first entrance into a regular community, the idea, and even the name, of all separate or exclusive possessions.

And even if he were to relapse into the same heresy which he had abjured, he would still not be liable to the said penalty, although he would be more severely punished than would have been the case if he had not abjured.

The second is when he has abjured al heresy in general, and yet lapses into another heresy, even if he has never before been suspected or accused of that heresy.

Even the news that the Yorktown, after quelling the fires and resuming fleet speed, had been torpedoed in a second attack, was again ablaze and listing, and might be abandoned, could be taken in stride.