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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Entreat

Entreat \En*treat"\, n. Entreaty. [Obs.]
--Ford.

Entreat

Entreat \En*treat"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Entreated; p. pr. & vb. n. Entreating.] [OE. entreten to treat, request, OF. entraiter to treat of; pref. en- (L. in) + traitier to treat. See Treat.]

  1. To treat, or conduct toward; to deal with; to use. [Obs.]

    Fairly let her be entreated.
    --Shak.

    I will cause the enemy to entreat thee well.
    --Jer. xv. 11.

  2. To treat with, or in respect to, a thing desired; hence, to ask earnestly; to beseech; to petition or pray with urgency; to supplicate; to importune. ``Entreat my wife to come.'' ``I do entreat your patience.''
    --Shak.

    I must entreat of you some of that money.
    --Shak.

    Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door.
    --Poe.

    Isaac entreated the Lord for his wife.
    --Gen. xxv. 21.

  3. To beseech or supplicate successfully; to prevail upon by prayer or solicitation; to persuade.

    It were a fruitless attempt to appease a power whom no prayers could entreat.
    --Rogers.

  4. To invite; to entertain. [Obs.] ``Pleasures to entreat.''
    --Spenser.

    Syn: To beseech; beg; solicit; crave; implore; supplicate. See Beseech.

Entreat

Entreat \En*treat"\, v. i.

  1. To treat or discourse; hence, to enter into negotiations, as for a treaty. [Obs.]

    Of which I shall have further occasion to entreat.
    --Hakewill.

    Alexander . . . was first that entreated of true peace with them.
    --1 Mac. x. 47.

  2. To make an earnest petition or request.

    The Janizaries entreated for them as valiant men.
    --Knolles.

Wikipedia

Entreat

Entreat is a live album by The Cure, recorded at London's Wembley Arena in July 1989. It consists entirely of songs performed from the band's 1989 record Disintegration; while they were on their international Prayer tour. Entreat was distributed exclusively in France as a promotional tool. When bootlegs began to surface, however, the album was given a limited European release.

"Entreat" was also given away free by HMV stores in the UK and Ireland to customers who purchased two CDs from the band's back catalogue.

The last two tracks were released in 1989 as b-sides to the US version of " Lullaby". "Fascination Street", "Last Dance", "Prayers For Rain", and "Disintegration" were also included as b-sides on the " Pictures of You" CD single.

The re-release of Disintegration in 2010 featured a remastered and remixed version of Entreat, entitled Entreat Plus because it featured all twelve songs from the album, including the four excluded from the original. It was the first time the album was released worldwide, though it had already been released on CD before.

Wiktionary

entreat

n. (alternative form of entreaty English) vb. 1 (context obsolete English) To treat, or conduct toward; to deal with; to use. 2 To treat with, or in respect to, a thing desired; hence, to ask earnestly; to beseech; to petition or pray with urgency; to supplicate; to importune. 3 To beseech or supplicate (a person); to prevail upon by prayer or solicitation; to try to persuade. 4 (context obsolete English) To invite; to entertain. 5 (context obsolete English) To treat or discourse; hence, to enter into negotiations, as for a treaty. 6 (context obsolete English) To make an earnest petition or request.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

entreat

verb
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Rayburn entreated them to hand over their guns.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Amelia fluttered against his lips, entreating to be let back in.
▪ And he beseeched me to entreat your Majesties To hear and see the matter.
▪ Miracles can be worked by Him alone, although mere mortals may entreat Him by prayer to perform them on their behalf.
▪ My grandparents and father entreated the doctors to tell them how she fared.
▪ They were there to be beseeched and entreated for their protection and aid in adversity, but what if they failed?
Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

entreat

c.1400, "to enter into negotiations," especially "discuss or arrange peace terms;" also "to treat (someone) in a certain way," from Anglo-French entretier, Old French entraiter "to treat," from en- "make" (see en- (1)) + traiter "to treat" (see treat (v.)). Meaning "to beseech, implore, plead with (someone)" is from early 15c.; meaning "to plead for (someone)" is from mid-15c. Related: Entreated; entreating.

WordNet

entreat

v. ask for or request earnestly; "The prophet bid all people to become good persons" [syn: bid, beseech, adjure, press, conjure]

Usage examples of "entreat".

He entreated her to pray with him and by diverse almsgiving and acts of mercy to beggars brought her into charity with him.

She took leave of him with tears in her eyes, entreating him often to visit her in that heathen land of the Amorite, the Hittite, and the Girgashite: to which he assented, on many solemn and qualifying conditions--and then the comely bride retired to her chamber to pray.

BentAnat yesterday morning committed a heavy sin, and that in all the temples in the land the Gods shall be entreated with offerings to take her uncleanness from her.

Bragadin answered that De la Haye could take up his quarters with us in his palace, and that Bavois was to write to his protector, the Pope, entreating His Holiness to recommend him to the ambassador of Venice, who would then forward that recommendation to the Senate, and that Bavois could, in that way, feel sure of good employment.

I entreat him likewise to forward my certificate of baptism, the seal with the armorial bearings of my family, and a legal certificate of my birth to the French ambassador in Venice, who will send the whole to the duke, my father, my rights of primogeniture belonging, after my demise, to the prince, my brother.

I more than once entreated Bessie Kitel to give up persistently wearing a red rose worked on her boddice in the presence of such men as Sire John.

I entreat Thee, by Him Who is the Dayspring of Thy names and the Dawning-Place of Thine attributes, to ordain for me what will enable me to arise to serve Thee and to extol Thy virtues.

Dear Miss Derham, will you tell her how much I desire to see her, and entreat her to make my house her home.

The approaching interview with her uncle she regarded with some degree of hope, for she determined to represent to him the distresses of her situation, and to entreat that he would allow her to return to France with him and Madame Quesnel.

Tyrold entreated him to be concise, and insisted upon the extremest forbearance and fortitude in his little audience.

Their courage and resignation never forsook them even for a moment, and Georges, knowing that it was rumoured he had obtained a pardon, entreated that he might die the first, in order that his companions in their last moments might be assured he had not survived them.

After that sentence, which brought the blood to the face of the Jesuit, but which my friends thought very wise, I entreated him, in a meaning voice, to spare his anxiety about me, and to be quite certain that I knew the laws of honour, and that I had judgment enough to take care of myself, and to let foul tongues say what they liked about me, just as I did when I heard them speak ill of him.

Honour, that Sophia had a violent inclination to Jones, she conceived that to dissuade her from the match was an endeavour of the same kind, as it would be very heartily and earnestly to entreat a moth not to fly into a candle.

A few in the crowd recognized it as the ceremonial knife of the Khond sacrifice of the Meriah, a ritual not openly practiced in India for at least a hundred and fifty years, where a human sacrifice was put to death by strangulation and his body dismembered and spread over the fields to entreat the gods for a good harvest.

Lucrezia, dying of enjoyment, entreats me to stop, but, as I do not listen to her prayer, she tricks me, and the sweet Angelique makes her first sacrifice to the mother of love.