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Duoprism

bgcolor=#e7dcc3 colspan=2 align=center|Set of uniform p-q duoprisms

bgcolor=#e7dcc3|Type

bgcolor=#e7dcc3| Schläfli symbol

bgcolor=#e7dcc3| Coxeter-Dynkin diagram

bgcolor=#e7dcc3|Cells

bgcolor=#e7dcc3|Faces

bgcolor=#e7dcc3|Edges

bgcolor=#e7dcc3|Vertices

bgcolor=#e7dcc3| Vertex figure

bgcolor=#e7dcc3| Symmetry

bgcolor=#e7dcc3| Dual

bgcolor=#e7dcc3|Properties

colspan=2| 

bgcolor=#e7dcc3 colspan=2 align=center|Set of uniform p-p duoprisms

bgcolor=#e7dcc3|Type

bgcolor=#e7dcc3| Schläfli symbol

bgcolor=#e7dcc3| Coxeter-Dynkin diagram

bgcolor=#e7dcc3|Cells

bgcolor=#e7dcc3|Faces

bgcolor=#e7dcc3|Edges

bgcolor=#e7dcc3|Vertices

bgcolor=#e7dcc3| Symmetry

bgcolor=#e7dcc3| Dual

bgcolor=#e7dcc3|Properties

In geometry of 4 dimensions or higher, a duoprism is a polytope resulting from the Cartesian product of two polytopes, each of two dimensions or higher. The Cartesian product of an n-polytope and an m-polytope is an (n+m)-polytope, where n and m are 2 ( polygon) or higher.

The lowest-dimensional duoprisms exist in 4-dimensional space as 4-polytopes being the Cartesian product of two polygons in 2-dimensional Euclidean space. More precisely, it is the set of points:


P × P = {(x, y, z, w)∣(x, y) ∈ P, (z, w) ∈ P}

where P and P are the sets of the points contained in the respective polygons. Such a duoprism is convex if both bases are convex, and is bounded by prismatic cells.