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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

dried

adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
cut and dried
▪ I don’t think the plan is as cut and dried as people think.
dried fish (=preserved by having the water removed)
▪ Occasionally, the guards gave us some vegetables and dried fish.
dried flowers
▪ She had brightened up the room with a vase of dried flowers.
dried fruit
dried milk
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
apricot
▪ To get good dried apricots it is nowadays necessary to shop for them in wholefood and health food stores.
▪ A good addition to dried apricot fool is a spoonful or two of freshly ground almonds.
▪ Commercially dried apricots are exposed to sulphur dioxide to preserve their colour, before they are dried in hot air.
blood
▪ The hepatitis B virus may be stable in dried blood and blood products at room temperature for up to seven days.
▪ The plaster walls were damp and cracked, the floor unswept, its stones stained with dried blood and excrement.
▪ What with that and the dried blood, his wife refuses to eat them, so berries for eating are grown separately.
▪ He looked a mess, his face covered in bruises and dried blood.
▪ The hair looked as though it were smeared with dried blood.
▪ From his mouth crawled a long, dead centipede of dried blood.
▪ As the gaunt farmer Spoke, Sparkes noticed dried blood on his shirt front where it met his breeches.
▪ It's dried blood that's difficult.
fish
▪ Sometimes only dried fish and dates and a little rice.
flower
▪ We sell dried flowers and herbs by the bunch and a large range of baskets.
▪ In the centre of the room was a large wooden table holding a stoneware jar of dried flowers.
▪ Cloves are dried flower buds and are usually sold whole.
▪ Here at the Moredon Community Gardening Centre, there are regular classes on anything from hanging baskets to dried flower arranging.
▪ For a more permanent display use dried flowers.
▪ Not a table with dried flowers.
▪ The Ideal Home Decorating School gives you details of exclusive readers' courses that cover everything from paint effects to dried flowers.
▪ When the magazine folded she specialised in dried flowers which had the virtue of not being able to shriek back.
food
▪ Thus when the dried food is gone, a favourite delicacy is given for a job well done.
▪ Feed a diet of insects, worms, plant matter, flake food and freeze dried food.
▪ Start with a single piece of dried food as a first course and offer nothing more until it is consumed.
▪ There's some kind of dried food stuck on the volume control.
▪ Where such foods are not available, dried foods can be used.
▪ Below right: Most modern dried foods will offer the right formulation for your fish - but choose carefully.
▪ After cooking, wash in warm, soapy water; soak in suds for longer periods to remove dried food particles.
▪ They were thick with dried food and grime.
fruit
▪ As the name suggests, the tomatoes are dried in the sun to make them dehydrated like a dried fruit.
▪ Stir in flour and coconut and mix in dried fruit and chopped cherries.
▪ Beat in the mixed dried fruit and milk and turn into the prepared can.
▪ It was a strange supper - tomatoes, potato chips, dried fruit and cake.
▪ Combine the dried fruits and mix with the grated orange and lemon rind.
▪ This way rather a lot of calories can be consumed; the chart gives the number of calories per ounce of dried fruit.
▪ Heather from flours and dried fruits was standing in the gap between two aisles.
grass
▪ He wore a cap of rabbit-fur decorated with a handful of dried grasses stuck in the seam.
▪ My face was on dead leaves and dried grass and pieces of twig.
▪ She stood near a great vase of dried grasses and leaves and her dress was something flowery.
▪ The snowflakes were caking up on the dried grasses and ferns on either bank.
▪ I have often put out some dried grass or leaves and had badgers make use of my offerings the very same evening.
▪ Chop some dried grass into small pieces and put it in a saucepan with water.
▪ A tangled ball of dried grass raced back towards Aulef like a whippet bound for home.
▪ A sudden breeze rustled the dried grasses and surrounding scrub.
herb
▪ The smell of dried herbs rose up from the bedclothes.
▪ From these smoke-blackened beams Agnes Poley had hung her sides of bacon, her bundles of dried herbs.
milk
▪ Hoardings for Nespray - the Nestlé dried milk - are everywhere.
▪ For breakfast the family eats a thin maize porridge made from dried milk, prepared over an open fire.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Dried herbs are convenient but I think fresh ones have more flavour.
▪ Add four tablespoons of dried milk to a pint of cold water, and stir until dissolved.
▪ My friend Minu loves dried flowers.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ For a more permanent display use dried flowers.
▪ He looked a mess, his face covered in bruises and dried blood.
▪ Here at the Moredon Community Gardening Centre, there are regular classes on anything from hanging baskets to dried flower arranging.
▪ Stir in flour and coconut and mix in dried fruit and chopped cherries.
▪ The hepatitis B virus may be stable in dried blood and blood products at room temperature for up to seven days.
▪ The Ideal Home Decorating School gives you details of exclusive readers' courses that cover everything from paint effects to dried flowers.
▪ There it is added to the fuel in the kilns where the malted barley is dried.
▪ There were dried sticks and brown leaves everywhere.
WordNet

dry

  1. n. a reformer who opposes the use of intoxicating beverages [syn: prohibitionist]

  2. [also: dried, dryest, dryer, driest, drier]

dry

  1. v. remove the moisture from and make dry; "dry clothes"; "dry hair" [syn: dry out] [ant: wet]

  2. become dry or drier; "The laundry dries in the sun" [syn: dry out]

  3. [also: dried, dryest, dryer, driest, drier]

dried

  1. adj. not still wet; "the ink has dried"; "a face marked with dried tears"

  2. preserved by removing natural moisture; "dried beef"; "dried fruit"; "dehydrated eggs"; "shredded and desiccated coconut meat" [syn: dehydrated, desiccated]

dry

  1. adj. free from liquid or moisture; lacking natural or normal moisture or depleted of water; or no longer wet; "dry land"; "dry clothes"; "a dry climate"; "dry splintery boards"; "a dry river bed"; "the paint is dry" [ant: wet]

  2. humorously sarcastic or mocking; "dry humor"; "an ironic remark often conveys an intended meaning obliquely"; "an ironic novel"; "an ironical smile"; "with a wry Scottish wit" [syn: ironic, ironical, wry]

  3. opposed to or prohibiting the production and sale of alcoholic beverages; "the dry vote led by preachers and bootleggers"; "a dry state" [ant: wet]

  4. not producing milk; "a dry cow" [ant: wet]

  5. (of wines) not sweet because of decomposition of sugar during fermentation; "a dry white burgundy" [ant: sweet]

  6. without a mucous or watery discharge; "a dry cough"; "that rare thing in the wintertime; a small child with a dry nose" [ant: phlegmy]

  7. not shedding tears; "dry sobs"; "with dry eyes"

  8. lacking interest or stimulation; dull and lifeless; "a dry book"; "a dry lecture filled with trivial details"; "dull and juiceless as only book knowledge can be when it is unrelated to...life"- John Mason Brown [syn: juiceless]

  9. used of solid substances in contrast with liquid ones; "dry weight"

  10. unproductive especially of the expected results; "a dry run"; "a mind dry of new ideas"

  11. having no adornment or coloration; "dry facts"; "rattled off the facts in a dry mechanical manner"

  12. (of food) eaten without a spread or sauce or other garnish; "dry toast"; "dry meat"

  13. suffering from fluid deprivation; "his mouth was dry"

  14. having a large proportion of strong liquor; "a very dry martini is almost straight gin"

  15. lacking warmth or emotional involvement; "a dry greeting"; "a dry reading of the lines"; "a dry critique"

  16. practicing complete abstinence from alcoholic beverages; "he's been dry for ten years"; "no thank you; I happen to be teetotal" [syn: teetotal]

  17. [also: dried, dryest, dryer, driest, drier]

dried

See dry

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Dried

Dried \Dried\ (dr[imac]d), imp. & p. p. of Dry. Also adj.; as, dried apples.

Dried

Dry \Dry\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Dried; p. pr. & vb. n. Drying.] [AS. drygan; cf. drugian to grow dry. See Dry, a.] To make dry; to free from water, or from moisture of any kind, and by any means; to exsiccate; as, to dry the eyes; to dry one's tears; the wind dries the earth; to dry a wet cloth; to dry hay. To dry up.

  1. To scorch or parch with thirst; to deprive utterly of water; to consume.

    Their honorable men are famished, and their multitude dried up with thirst. -- Is. v. 13.

    The water of the sea, which formerly covered it, was in time exhaled and dried up by the sun.
    --Woodward.

  2. To make to cease, as a stream of talk.

    Their sources of revenue were dried up. -- Jowett (Thucyd. )

    To dry a cow, or To dry up a cow, to cause a cow to cease secreting milk.
    --Tylor.

Wiktionary

dried

  1. 1 Without water or moisture. 2 (Usually foods) cured, preserved. Having been dried by a process. Such as dried fruit, dried fish, dried meat, etc. v

  2. (en-pastdry)

Wikipedia

Usage examples of "dried".

Black and blue halos rimmed her eyes, and her cheeks were abraided, with dried blood at one corner of her mouth.

A small area of abrasion or contusion was on the cheek near the right ear, and a prominent dried abrasion was on the lower left side of the neck.

The braziers began giving off a thick, resinous, overly sweet smoke with something astringent to it but I had no way of knowing if it was, in fact, the perfume the grimoire had specified for operations ruled by the planet Mercury: a mixture of mastic, frankincense, cinquefoil, achates, and the dried and powdered brains of a fox.

An excellent poison can be swiftly produced under field conditions by boiling two baskets of oleander leaves, distilling the essence, and adding three ounces of dried aconite tubers.