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Wiktionary

dree

Etymology 1 vb. 1 (context transitive English) To suffer; bear; thole; endure; put up with; undergo. 2 (context intransitive English) To endure; brook; be able to do or continue. Etymology 2

  1. 1 (context now chiefly dialectal English) long; large; ample; great. 2 (context now chiefly dialectal English) Great; of serious moment. 3 (context now chiefly dialectal English) tedious; wearisome; tiresome. alt. 1 (context now chiefly dialectal English) long; large; ample; great. 2 (context now chiefly dialectal English) Great; of serious moment. 3 (context now chiefly dialectal English) tedious; wearisome; tiresome. Etymology 3

    n. (context now chiefly dialectal English) length; extension; the longest part.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Dree

Dree \Dree\ (dr[=e]), v. t. [AS. dre['o]gan to bear, endure, complete.] To endure; to suffer. [Scot.]

Dree

Dree \Dree\, v. i. To be able to do or endure. [Obs.]

Dree

Dree \Dree\, a. Wearisome; tedious. [Prov. Eng.]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

dree

Old English dreogan "to work, suffer, endure;" see drudge. Cognate of Old Norse drygjado "carry out, accomplish," Gothic driugan "serve as a soldier."

Wikipedia

Drée

''' Drée ''' is a commune in the Côte-d'Or department in eastern France.

Usage examples of "dree".

Gipsy gemman see, With his Roman jib and his rome and dree-- Rome and dree, rum and dry Rally round the Rommany Rye.

I remember the day on the Bridge of Dreed, how his face even then resembled my own.

He was gaunt, pale, almost cadaverous—a far cry from the robust man who had stood on the Bridge of Dreed nine years ago awaiting the arrival of his Solamnic hostage.

Ne dreed hem nat, doth hem no reverence, For though thyn housbonde armed be in maille, The arwes of thy crabbed eloquence Shal perce his brest and eek his aventaille.

Let us leave them, for men must be left to, each, the dreeing of his own weird.

To be short, though it were called the Least Guard-chamber, it was a prison, and she was there dreeing her penance, as Dame Elinor would call the cruelty of her malice, which the chaplain, Dame Elinor's led captain, had ordained her for some sin which the twain had forged between them.