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Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

dreck

"filth, trash," 1922, from Yiddish drek (German dreck), from Middle High German drec, from Proto-Germanic *threkka (cognates: Old English þreax "rubbish," Old Frisian threkk), perhaps connected to Greek skatos "dung," Latin stercus "excrement," from PIE root *(s)ker- "to cut" (see shear (v.)).

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

dreck

noun
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ There's just so much dreck on TV this season.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And so I sit here gurgling into my glass and soaking up all that moronic dreck.
▪ I can't tell you the dreck we're going to have in it.
WordNet

dreck

n. merchandise that is shoddy or inferior [syn: schlock, shlock]

Wiktionary

dreck

n. trash, junk; worthless merchandise, crap.

Usage examples of "dreck".

This innovation has produced some quality magazines and webzines and a lot of dreck.

He was going to save the country, save the world, in spite of its slavish ingrained genuflection to oversweetened dreck.

This innovation has produced some quality magazines and webzines and a lot of dreck.

Same problem Ellayway, though there the hirer was government, drecking the draftees to the Pacific Conflict Zone, but who's richer than a government?

I'm not handing out compliments now - I've moved on to the brickbat stage, and believe me there are some people out there who deserve to be snowed under with barrels of dreck for abdicating their responsibilities as thinking individuals.

Yesterday evening I was having dinner at the Bel Air Hotel and June Lassiter came over and gave me a very difficult time about that dreck you tried to sell her.

There hasn't been any clean air in our neighbourhood for sheeting weeks because of rotting dreck all over the streets and now it's beginning to block the passages!