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Din

DIN or Din or din can have several meanings:

  • Dīn, an Arabic term meaning "religion" or "way of life"
  • Din (Kabbalah), one of the ten aspects of the Ein Sof in Kabbalah (more commonly known as "Gevurah")
  • Din (surname)
  • DIN is the abbreviated name of the Deutsches Institut für Normung (German Institute for Standardization) and is used in the names of its standards, like:
    • DIN 1451, German Standard Committee chosen typeface from 1936.
    • DIN 4512, a definition of film speed
    • DIN 476, as for example DIN A4, is a scale for paper sizes.
    • DIN 31635, an Arabic transliteration scheme.
    • DIN 72552 is a standard for automobile electric terminal numbers.
    • DIN connector, one of a number of electrical (audio/video/keyboard) connectors following DIN standards.
    • DIN fitting, a type of high-pressure air or gas connection used in some modern very high-pressure scuba gear.
    • DIN ISO 7736, size standard for car audio head units.
    • DIN Panel cutout size, a standard for cutouts for industrial panel mount equipment.
    • DIN rail, a common system for mounting circuit breakers and industrial control equipment inside equipment racks.
    • DIN ski binding scale, scale to ensure ski bindings release under the same force at all skiing destinations worldwide.
    • FF DIN, 1995 digital typeface
    • DIN 66036, a metric horsepower
  • Din, Guinea
  • Din, Iran
  • Drug Identification Number - a unique number given to all drugs sold in Canada.
  • Din (The Legend of Zelda), a goddess in The Legend of Zelda series of video games
  • Serbian dinar, a local abbreviation
In music:
  • Din, a member of the Harvard Din and Tonics
  • Din, an alias used by electronic music producer J.C. Cutz
  • Din, the band on Guitar Hero that did the song Fly on the Wall as a bonus track
  • Din (din is noise), a free software musical instrument & audio synthesizer
  • Din, a song by Therion from the album Sitra Ahra

Category:Three-letter disambiguation pages

Dīn

(, also anglicized as Deen) is a Persian word , commonly associated with Zoroastrianism and Islam, but it is also used in Sikhism and Arab Christian worship. The term is loosely associated with religion, but in the Qur'an, it means the way of life in which righteous Muslims must adopt to comply with divine law (Quran and sunnah), or Shari'a, and to the divine judgment or recompense to which all humanity must inevitably face without intercessors before God. Thus, although secular Muslims would say that their practical interpretation of Dīn conforms to "religion" in the restricted sense of something that can be carried out in separation from other areas of life, both mainstream and reformist Muslim writers take the word to mean an all-encompassing way of life carried out under the auspices of God's divine purpose as expressed in the Qur'an and hadith. As one notably progressive Muslim writer puts it, far from being a discrete aspect of life carried out in the mosque, "Islam is Dīn, a complete way of life".

Din (din is noise)

DIN (DIN Is Noise) is a software musical instrument for the Linux, Mac OS X and Windows operating systems. A DIN player either plays with a keyboard, or uses the computer mouse to pick both the pitch (by moving horizontally) and the volume (by moving vertically) of a sound from an on-screen keyboard that displays the notes of the current scale and a number of microtones in-between. By varying the mouse position, a player can simultaneously change the pitch & volume of their sound and improvise their music. Players can use Bezier curves to create and sculpt waveforms to change the timbre of the instrument, provide carrier and modulator waveforms for the FM and AM and control other parameters like stereo gater patterns, Delay feedback & volume patterns and Compressor patterns. Users can also create an unlimited number of drones pitched on any microtone and edit them in real-time.

DIN uses JACK to output audio on Linux and accepts input using MIDI, OSC & IRC protocols.

DIN is free software on Linux and proprietary software on Windows and Mac OS X.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

din

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
hear
▪ The Doctor was left to wave his arms and shout; he could not be heard above the din.
▪ We have to move upstairs to the mezzanine just so we can hear ourselves over the din.
▪ So far neither of them had raised their voices, or only enough to be heard above Gordon's din.
▪ In a room full of shouting people, you have to yell to be heard above the din.
▪ It spread before Maggie, and she'd never heard such a din.
▪ He was playing music of some kind, it was hard to hear for the din.
▪ They did not have far to go before they heard the din of conflict ahead.
▪ But it is a case that can not be heard above the din of bombs and bullets.
make
▪ The throttle lever was still against the wall and the engine was making a healthy din up front.
▪ The machines made a factory din, like a stamping plant maybe.
▪ The birds are making a din.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
almighty din/crash/row etc
▪ And certainly there would be the most almighty row if Clarke got the push.
▪ Before he got half way, they dropped with an almighty crash on to the stone floor.
set up a commotion/din/racket etc
▪ Crickets set up a racket in trees out in the yard.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I shouted to make myself heard above the din.
▪ The hall resounded with the din of thirty children scraping violins, banging drums and singing loudly.
▪ We couldn't hear ourselves talk above the din of the crowd.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Insert an addictive drug into the system and the din from the second messengers becomes deafening.
▪ It feels awkward to be voicing our most personal pain above the din of the airport.
▪ It was a harrowing din, a cascade of furious voices merged into a single pulsating shout.
▪ The din in the hall stilled.
▪ The Doctor was left to wave his arms and shout; he could not be heard above the din.
▪ The fans were out of their minds, and the din was deafening.
▪ Their combined din, after a few hours, got to be annoying.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
almighty din/crash/row etc
▪ And certainly there would be the most almighty row if Clarke got the push.
▪ Before he got half way, they dropped with an almighty crash on to the stone floor.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Din

Din \Din\, v. i. To sound with a din; a ding.

The gay viol dinning in the dale.
--A. Seward.

Din

Din \Din\ (d[i^]n), n. [AS. dyne, dyn; akin to Icel. dynr, and to AS. dynian to resound, Icel. dynja to pour down like hail or rain; cf. Skr. dhuni roaring, a torrent, dhvan to sound. Cf. Dun to ask payment.] Loud, confused, harsh noise; a loud, continuous, rattling or clanging sound; clamor; roar.

Think you a little din can daunt mine ears?
--Shak.

He knew the battle's din afar.
--Sir W. Scott.

The dust and din and steam of town.
--Tennyson.

Din

Din \Din\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Dinned; p. pr. & vb. n. Dinning.] [AS. dynian. See Din, n.]

  1. To strike with confused or clanging sound; to stun with loud and continued noise; to harass with clamor; as, to din the ears with cries.

  2. To utter with a din; to repeat noisily; to ding.

    This hath been often dinned in my ears.
    --Swift.

    To din into, to fix in the mind of another by frequent and noisy repetitions.
    --Sir W. Scott.

WordNet

din

  1. n. a loud harsh or strident noise [syn: blare, blaring, cacophony, clamor]

  2. the act of making a noisy disturbance [syn: commotion, ruction, ruckus, rumpus, tumult]

  3. [also: dinning, dinned]

din

  1. v. make a resonant sound, like artillery; "His deep voice boomed through the hall" [syn: boom]

  2. instill (into a person) by constant repetition; "he dinned the lessons into his students"

  3. [also: dinning, dinned]

Wiktionary

din

Etymology 1 n. A loud noise; a cacophony or loud commotion. Etymology 2

vb. 1 (context obsolete English) To be filled with sound; to resound. 2 (context transitive English) To assail with loud noise. 3 (context transitive English) To repeat continuously, as though to the point of deafening or exhausting somebody. 4 (context intransitive English) To make a din.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

din

Old English dyne (n.), dynian (v.), from Proto-Germanic *duniz (cognates: Old Norse dynr, Danish don, Middle Low German don "noise"), from PIE root *dwen- "to make noise" (cognates: Sanskrit dhuni "roaring, a torrent").

Usage examples of "din".

But, no, Zaida would divorce Amel and marry a ballast stone before she sent Harine din Togara as her ambassador.

Baynes family, except the dog, showed up at the ashram and presented themselves to Ban Sar Din.

Baynes, and turned to Ban Sar Din to ask if the ashram offered yoga programs, breathing, discussion groups, chanting, and had guest speakers.

Ban Sar Din ran out into the ashram from his holy office in the back, dumped out a batch of yellow handkerchiefs, and ran back to his office.

Ban Sar Din said, wondering what would happen if she got picked up for murder alone, without another member of the ashram around to kill her before she could spill the beans to the police.

Ban Sar Din, but he looked to the back of the ashram, even as he filled his other pocket with more jewels and cash.

Making an appalling din and poisoning the air, this medley of heterogeneous vehicles surged past the half-asphyxiated Ave or thundered overhead on the crazy bridges between the massive artificial canyons of the buildings.

Heavy surf pounded the beaches, small craft took shelter behind the block-ships, all work stopped, ships anchored off shore dragged anchors and fouled one another, beaching craft were driven ashore, Mulberry A began to break up, and the crash of small craft, dukws, vehicles and derelict units grinding together was heard above the din of war.

Growls, bleets, chitterings, cheeps, honks and haggling created an ear-curdling din.

One of them said that the stranger who had offered money for your slaying lay in the house of Akmed din Soulef with a broken wrist, but that he had offered a still greater reward if some would lay in wait for you upon the road to Bou Saada and kill you.

With sickening thuds, axes joined the cacophonous din of death and cleaved helms, opened skulls, spilled brains.

But whatever her performance lacked in artistry it made up in noise, her drum and cymbals awaking such a din that existence was unbearable within ten feet of them.

All around him a terrible sound dinned in his ears, the shriek of hundreds of men and horses dying in an agony of flames.

For one moment all the shouts and the dinning of hooves receded into a blur of sound.

I knew none of these people and for a moment the old shyness in me overcame my whisky-stimulated gaiety, and in the pushing and shoving and the din of voices I was looking round for Doddy or Jackie when I came face to face with someone I did know.