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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Deride

Deride \De*ride"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Derided; p. pr. & vb. n. Deriding.] [L. deridere, derisum; de- + rid?re to laugh. See Ridicule.] To laugh at with contempt; to laugh to scorn; to turn to ridicule or make sport of; to mock; to scoff at.

And the Pharisees, also, . . . derided him.
--Luke xvi. 14.

Sport that wrinkled Care derides. And Laughter holding both his sides.
--Milton.

Syn: To mock; laugh at; ridicule; insult; taunt; jeer; banter; rally.

Usage: To Deride, Ridicule, Mock, Taunt. A man may ridicule without any unkindness of feeling; his object may be to correct; as, to ridicule the follies of the age. He who derides is actuated by a severe a contemptuous spirit; as, to deride one for his religious principles. To mock is stronger, and denotes open and scornful derision; as, to mock at sin. To taunt is to reproach with the keenest insult; as, to taunt one for his misfortunes. Ridicule consists more in words than in actions; derision and mockery evince themselves in actions as well as words; taunts are always expressed in words of extreme bitterness.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

deride

verb
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Gavin has derided McLaughlin's crusade for gun control.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Andrew Jackson, the first president from the western frontier, was unjustly accused of bigamy and derided as an unschooled ignoramus.
▪ Leave it to the intellectuals to deride romance novels.
▪ Marxism has been frequently derided for its explanations of political behaviour in Western democracies.
▪ Other identifications - whether with feminism, the gay community, independent activist organisations - are derided as bourgeois and self-limiting.
Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

deride

1520s, from Middle French derider, from Latin deridere "to ridicule, laugh to scorn" (see derision). Related: Derided; deriding.

WordNet

deride

v. treat or speak of with contempt; "He derided his student's attempt to solve the biggest problem in mathematics"

Wiktionary

deride

vb. (context transitive English) To harshly mock; ridicule.

Usage examples of "deride".

I should tamely submit to be a derided, outcast husband, that I should take no vengeance upon, that villainous Pope for having made me a thing of scorn, a byword throughout Italy?

They affected to deride the palaces, the banquets, the polished manner of the Italians, who in the estimate of the Greeks themselves had degenerated from the liberty and valor of the ancient Lombards.

Sea full of shelves and rocks, sands, gulfs, Euripuses, and contrary tides, full of fearful monsters, uncouth shapes, roaring waves, tempests, and Siren calms, Halcyonian Seas, unspeakable misery, such Comedies and Tragedies, such absurd and ridiculous, feral and lamentable fits, that I know not whether they are more to be pitied or derided, or may be believed, but that we daily see the same still practiced in our days, fresh examples, new news, fresh objects of misery and madness in this kind, that are still represented to us, abroad, at home, in the midst of us, in our bosoms.

Was it true that the police had again been hoodwinked, justice derided, and the law set at defiance by a gang of ruffians who would have been run down in a fortnight had the police force been equal to the task entrusted to them?

May not those naturalists who, knowing far less of the laws of inheritance than does the breeder, and knowing no more than he does of the intermediate links in the long lines of descent, yet admit that many of our domestic races have descended from the same parents--may they not learn a lesson of caution, when they deride the idea of species in a state of nature being lineal descendants of other species?

Great honors were then paid to the shades of those who had annihilated the odd ancient beings, and the memory of those beings and of their elder gods was derided by dancers and lutanists crowned with roses from the gardens of Zokkar.

Muslimeen, derided by the Jews, spat upon and smitten by the people whose hungry mouths he had fed with bread.

When I got to this abode of misery and despair, a hell, such as Dante might have conceived, a crowd of wretches, some of whom were to be hanged in the course of the week, greeted me by deriding my elegant attire.

Something rare came into Bern Thorkellson in that moment, with the deriding, confident voice and a memory of this man the night before.

The Greek word, which was chosen to express this mysterious resemblance, bears so close an affinity to the orthodox symbol, that the profane of every age have derided the furious contests which the difference of a single diphthong excited between the Homoousians and the Homoiousians.

Yoshimoto was deriding his enemy in his headquarters, Nobunaga was charging up the pathless slopes of Taishigadake.

Reverend Violet Swandown, considered by the orthodox as containing guidance and comfort for the soul under all possible circumstances,--these works were openly scoffed at and derided.

If there is one question which the enlightened and liberal have the habit of deriding and holding up as a dreadful example of barren dogma and senseless sectarian strife, it is this Athanasian question of the Co-Eternity of the Divine Son.

The Greek word, which was chosen to express this mysterious resemblance, bears so close an affinity to the orthodox symbol, that the profane of every age have derided the furious contests which the difference of a single diphthong excited between the Homoousians and the Homoiousians.

In fact, human society in pretechnological times was much more like that of the compassionate, communal and cultured Bushman hunter-gatherers of the Kalahari Desert than the Fuegians Darwin, with some justification, derided.