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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

deed

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
changed...name by deed poll
▪ Steve changed his name by deed poll to Elvis Presley-Smith.
deed poll
▪ Steve changed his name by deed poll to Elvis Presley-Smith.
good deed for the day (=something good you try to do for someone else every day)
▪ Well, that’s my good deed for the day.
title deed
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
evil
▪ Endued with evenness of mind, one casts off in this very life both good deeds and evil deeds.
▪ It was Ariel who tortured Antonio and the king with visions that made them repent their evil deeds.
good
▪ So shines a good deed in a naughty world.
▪ Through it all, Tatum maintained his posture of mover and shaker, champion of democracy, doer of good deeds.
▪ Do good deeds now and the result will be a future of happiness and blessing.
▪ That piece of paper would be, no question, a good deed.
▪ Mr Chance, of Nunthorpe, Cleveland, is a charity worker extraordinaire whose good deeds are mostly connected with mental handicap.
▪ Endued with evenness of mind, one casts off in this very life both good deeds and evil deeds.
▪ But on waking she pushed these resolutely aside and stomped out to do her good deeds.
▪ But no good deed goes unpunished in noire crime stories.
great
▪ And more disturbingly for the other clubs with ambition, the display promises even greater deeds.
▪ Therese, who died of tuberculosis in 1897 at the age of 24, performed no great deeds while she was alive.
▪ In your conduct in battle you must be worthy of the great deeds of this regiment's history.
▪ Eisenhower had not been aggressive enough, he tended to compromise, he could not stir the nation to great deeds.
▪ No country has a monopoly on bravery; great deeds of heroism are liable to break out in the most unexpected places.
▪ There his trials began and his great deeds as well.
▪ He traveled to many lands and did many other great deeds.
heroic
▪ Wagner in his day had preached purity of heart and heroic deeds.
▪ The wicked characters are imprisoned, and Wilkin is made a captain for his heroic deed in battle.
▪ It would, to Rab, be an heroic deed if the man had fought.
title
▪ A restrictive clause in the title deed limited the land use to mission purposes.
■ NOUN
mortgage
▪ We would give the same construction to the comparable provisions in the other mortgage deeds.
▪ In the mortgage deed the respondents further covenanted that they would purchase all their requirements from the appellants exclusively.
▪ Accordingly, we would construe the guarantee and debenture in the same way that we have construed the mortgage deeds.
▪ In the Esso case, the restraint in a supply and purchase contract was reinforced in a mortgage deed.
▪ Again, the appropriate mortgage deed will be sewn into the back of the certificate.
partnership
▪ Again, prior planning under the partnership deed may provide for purchase of a deceased or retired partner's share by valuation.
▪ We can identify a formal partnership by the partnership deed.
▪ It is the partnership deed which regulates the various legal rights and duties of the partners as between themselves.
▪ The dissolution, taking an account of the distribution of assets, should normally be provided for in the partnership deed.
▪ Section 24 applies to all partnerships irrespective of the provisions of a given partnership deed.
poll
▪ I suggested that he might think of removing the last three syllables from his name, which he did by deed poll.
▪ After changing his name by deed poll to Captain Beany he needed a renewed passport to match his new identity.
▪ The Law Society will require evidence such as a marriage certificate, deed poll or statutory declaration.
▪ Like his new name, changed by deed poll nine years before.
trust
▪ Any new stock will need to be constituted by an appropriate trust deed or loan stock instrument.
▪ Under the trust deed I appoint a Government observer and am consulted on the appointment of the chairman.
▪ Trustees for the stockholders and eurobond holders are appointed under trust deeds.
▪ These trust deeds usually contain an expert clause about the remuneration of the trustee appointed under the deed.
▪ The terms of the trust will need to be documented and the trustee made a party to the trust deed.
▪ You can also ask to see a copy of the trust deed as well as the latest annual report and audited accounts.
■ VERB
change
▪ After changing his name by deed poll to Captain Beany he needed a renewed passport to match his new identity.
▪ Like his new name, changed by deed poll nine years before.
commit
▪ One of these so-respectable people had either committed the deed or engineered it.
▪ So then I would not be here today, to go back and commit the deed!
▪ And they, in turn, commit the same deed on those who stand in the way of what they want.
do
▪ She doesn't know that Pete, of all people, did the dreadful deed.
▪ The will maker can register it in person or send some one to do the deed.
▪ He thinks Washington can do good deeds and disagrees with Texas Sen.
perform
▪ It is their destiny to perform mighty deeds and shape the fate of kingdoms.
▪ He took uncommon risks, performed unlikely deeds.
▪ We tarried awhile to watch Messrs Anderson and Rowe perform doughty deeds with caber and shot on a pleasant summers day.
▪ Therese, who died of tuberculosis in 1897 at the age of 24, performed no great deeds while she was alive.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
deeds/acts etc of derring-do
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ He grew up reading the tales and legends of heroic deeds.
▪ My grandfather signed the deed for this land.
▪ One day he will pay for his evil deeds.
▪ Parents can teach children their values by word and deed.
▪ Well, that's my good deed for the day.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ For example, if the title deeds are left with the company, an equitable mortgagee by deposit will take priority.
▪ I may as well explain here why he did this much-criticized and desperate deed of daring....
▪ She has earned acclaim for both words and deeds.
▪ Something happens, a deed is done, and the consequences just go rolling on.
▪ Such monstrous deeds always angered the gods and they served him as he had served others.
▪ The atrocious deeds they'd committed!
▪ The gulf between words and deeds would, Bertinotti feared, be more self-destructive than any other course of action.
▪ When Medea knew the deed was done she turned her mind to one still more dreadful.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Deed

Deed \Deed\ (d[=e]d), a. Dead. [Obs.]
--Chaucer.

Deed

Deed \Deed\, n. [AS. d[=ae]d; akin to OS. d[=a]d, D. & Dan. daad, G. that, Sw. d[*a]d, Goth. d[=e]ds; fr. the root of do. See Do, v. t.]

  1. That which is done or effected by a responsible agent; an act; an action; a thing done; -- a word of extensive application, including, whatever is done, good or bad, great or small.

    And Joseph said to them, What deed is this which ye have done?
    --Gen. xliv. 15.

    We receive the due reward of our deeds.
    --Luke xxiii. 41.

    Would serve his kind in deed and word.
    --Tennyson.

  2. Illustrious act; achievement; exploit. ``Knightly deeds.''
    --Spenser.

    Whose deeds some nobler poem shall adorn.
    --Dryden.

  3. Power of action; agency; efficiency. [Obs.]

    To be, both will and deed, created free.
    --Milton.

  4. Fact; reality; -- whence we have indeed.

  5. (Law) A sealed instrument in writing, on paper or parchment, duly executed and delivered, containing some transfer, bargain, or contract.

    Note: The term is generally applied to conveyances of real estate, and it is the prevailing doctrine that a deed must be signed as well as sealed, though at common law signing was formerly not necessary.

    Blank deed, a printed form containing the customary legal phraseology, with blank spaces for writing in names, dates, boundaries, etc.

  6. Performance; -- followed by of. [Obs.]
    --Shak.

    In deed, in fact; in truth; verily. See Indeed.

Deed

Deed \Deed\, v. t. To convey or transfer by deed; as, he deeded all his estate to his eldest son. [Colloq. U. S.]

Wikipedia

Deed

A deed (anciently an evidence) is any legal instrument in writing which passes, affirms or confirms an interest, right, or property and that is signed, attested, delivered, and in some jurisdictions, sealed. It is commonly associated with transferring title to property. The deed has a greater presumption of validity and is less rebuttable than an instrument signed by the party to the deed. A deed can be unilateral or bilateral. Deeds include conveyances, commissions, licenses, patents, diplomas, and conditionally powers of attorney if executed as deeds. The deed is the modern descendant of the medieval charter, and delivery is thought to symbolically replace the ancient ceremony of livery of seisin.

The traditional phrase signed, sealed and delivered refers to the practice of seals; however, attesting witnesses have replaced seals to some extent. Agreements under seal are also called contracts by deed or specialty; in the United States, a specialty is enforceable without consideration. In some jurisdictions, specialties have a liability limitation period of double that of a simple contract and allow for a third party beneficiary to enforce an undertaking in the deed, thereby overcoming the doctrine of privity. Specialties, as a form of contract, are bilateral and can therefore be distinguished from covenants, which, being also under seal, are unilateral promises.

Wiktionary

deed

n. 1 An action or act; something that is done. 2 A brave or noteworthy action; a feat or exploit. 3 Action or fact, as opposed to rhetoric or deliberation. 4 (context legal English) A legal contract showing bond in form of a document. vb. (context informal English) To transfer real property by deed.

WordNet

deed

  1. n. a notable achievement; "he performed a great deed"; "the book was her finest effort" [syn: feat, effort, exploit]

  2. a legal document signed and sealed and delivered to effect a transfer of property and to show the legal right to possess it; "he signed the deed"; "he kept the title to his car in the glove compartment" [syn: deed of conveyance, title]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

deed

Old English dæd "a doing, act, action, transaction, event," from Proto-Germanic *dædis (cognates: Old Saxon dad, Old Norse dað, Old Frisian dede, Middle Dutch daet, Dutch daad, Old High German tat, German Tat "deed," Gothic gadeþs "a putting, placing"), from PIE *dhetis (cognates: Lithuanian detis "load, burden," Greek thesis "a placing, setting"), from *dhe- "place, put" (see do). Sense of "written legal document" is early 14c. As a verb, 1806, American English Related: Deeded; deeding.

Usage examples of "deed".

Will you abjure such of your deeds and sayings as have been condemned by the clerks?

Now it is evident that in Penance something is done so that something holy is signified both on the part of the penitent sinner, and on the part of the priest absolving, because the penitent sinner, by deed and word, shows his heart to have renounced sin, and in like manner the priest, by his deed and word with regard to the penitent, signifies the work of God Who forgives his sins.

This is true of everything a man does from such persuasive faith, whether he is acknowledging God, worshiping Him at home or in church, or doing good deeds.

If a man examines only the external he sees only what he has committed to deed, and that he has not murdered or committed adultery or stolen or borne false witness, and so on.

For this reason one who is in the love of ruling from the love of self thinks nothing of defrauding his neighbor, committing adultery with his wife, slandering him, breathing vengeance on him even to the death, treating him cruelly, and other such deeds.

He explained that this was the time when the adolescents had to perform some great deed to earn adulthood, deeds that often included acts of mayhem against non-Sand People races.

I shall tell thee the boon that I would ask of thee and thy generosity has granted me, and it is that on the morrow thou wilt dub me a knight, and that this night in the chapel of thy castle I shall keep vigil over my armor, and on the morrow, as I have said, what I fervently desire will be accomplished so that I can, as I needs must do, travel the four corners of the earth in search of adventures on behalf of those in need, this being the office of chivalry and of knights errant, for I am one of them and my desire is disposed to such deeds.

I am called Don Quixote of La Mancha, knight errant in search of adventures, and captive of the beauteous and peerless Dona Dulcinea of Toboso, and as recompense for the boon thou hast received from me, I desire only that thou turnest toward Toboso, and on my behalf appearest before this lady and sayest unto her what deeds I have done to gain thy liberty.

Aye as I went, that maiden who had reared The torch of Truth afar, of whose high deeds The Hermit in his pilgrimage had heard, Haunted my thoughts.

Cut Paper Wrap Stone introduces us to Ethan Ring, a character somewhat like other cyberpunk heroes in his anomie, but less hard- edged and nihilistic -- rather than burnt out and affectless, Ring is plagued by guilt and self-recrimination over his deeds as an interrogator and assassin for the security arm of the pan-European government.

Those two and Mertyn had great deeds aflight, and all the coming and going in pursuit of them was dizzying.

Nevertheless, I walked about from door to door like a dejected beggar, till I got the almous deed of a civil reception--and who would have thought it?

Die schoonheid verzorgde zij zeer, als een dierbaar juweel, dat men laat fonkelen en flonkeren, en deze aanhoudende zorg deed haar als verlieven op wat zij bevalligs aan zich vond.

Then I knew them for the foemen and their deeds to be I knew, And I gathered the reins together to ride down the hill amain, To die with a good stroke stricken and slay ere I was slain.

That ye me touch or love in villainy, He right anon will slay you with the deed, And in your youthe thus ye shoulde die.