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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

deck

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an observation deck/platform/tower (=a structure that is built in order to observe something)
▪ The army built an observation tower on the top of the building.
deck shoe
flight deck
poop deck
promenade deck
tape deck
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
low
▪ They were so named because of their comfortable leather seats on the lower deck.
▪ The lower deck, below the water line, was for cargo.
▪ On the lower deck, where all the people are, there is the sense of an outrageous and clarifying happiness.
▪ There was no fish ing gear nor any big guns, just a long, low, uncluttered deck.
▪ She climbed aboard the Mumbles train and huddled in a seat in the warmth of the lower deck.
▪ The lower deck, shining clean now, was thronged with steerage passengers.
▪ At first he had assumed that she had climbed down to the lower deck and gone forward.
▪ The Hearthware armour was a shining pile on the lower deck.
main
▪ Lift from the car-deck on Sally Star goes to all floors; on Sally Sky to the main passenger deck only.
▪ Farther forward on the main deck from the A-frame is the Alvin hangar, where the submersible is serviced every evening.
▪ There was also a large saloon on the main deck which was a great asset for visiting V.I.P's and crew comfort.
▪ The main deck forward was ten inches thick and further reinforcement was fitted both fore and aft.
▪ It began to run over the main deck and the crew hurried off to shelter in the accommodation.
▪ The main deck features a most generous main salon and dining forward with seating for eight.
open
▪ And all the time, work going on internally while I wrestled with rigging and sails, mostly on the open deck.
▪ There were no rails, no cabin, just the open deck and a small wheelhouse near the stem.
▪ There are two options, inside, or out on the open deck.
▪ His life also was on the open deck.
▪ Thy life was on the open deck - Thou hadst no cabin for thy rest.
top
▪ He was sitting on the top deck of a London bus when the idea came to him.
▪ The dahabeeyah had moored for the night and the three girls had been up on the top deck enjoying the evening breeze.
▪ The 30 passengers - six on the top deck - included three pregnant women and several children.
▪ Penelope went to the top deck of the bus and lit a cigarette.
▪ Standard 42, one of the new cars fitted with an old Motherwell top deck, giving a strange angular appearance.
▪ The third had remained on the top deck.
▪ And it was from the top deck, apparently, that she had disappeared.
▪ He had found the top deck empty.
upper
▪ The upper decks were wide with two and two seating, except for a single seat by the trolley which was slightly offset.
▪ Or at least into the upper deck.
▪ It had a plain glazed back to illuminate the upper deck at night and the lamps were removed from the hoops.
▪ The drawback is that the high-rise upper deck means very little can be stored there during travel.
▪ A few of the gentlemen passengers stood on the upper deck and watched them impassively.
▪ The two-level tunnel comprises an upper road deck and a lower duct for services.
■ NOUN
cargo
▪ Underneath some shabby canvas tarps on the cargo deck were stacked a dozen bulky mattresses and twenty thick pine boards.
▪ Riker threw me the box and walked back to sit on the edge of the cargo deck.
▪ He slammed the butt of the weapon on my cargo deck and the thing went off.
▪ The scurrying grunts tossed a foot-filled boot on to the cargo deck.
▪ We landed about a hundred feet from the headquarters ten, sinking into the grass up to the cargo deck.
▪ Stacked on the cargo deck, they still fought, frozen inside their rubber bags, arms and legs stiffly askew.
cassette
▪ Tommy picks up the Magnum and fires it twice at the stereo, one bullet in each cassette deck.
▪ It has a serious graphic equaliser, full logic cassette deck and an all-singing all-dancing spectrum analyser.
▪ The supplied infra-red remote control handset also enables control of a suitably appointed Nakamichi cassette deck.
▪ And a cassette deck crooning the blues and Bach.
▪ I scrambled up and reached for the eject button on the cassette deck.
chair
▪ Shown here is the pool chair and deck chair that can be folded flat for easy storage.
▪ Hilbert and Lewis and Beryl sat in old-fashioned deck chairs with striped canvas seats.
▪ Margarett snaps Miss Sheldon, chaperone of the Florentine School, and two schoolmates lounging on deck chairs.
▪ Donald was sitting in a deck chair in his garden next door, when part of the chimney fell on him.
▪ This illness now, huddling in the deck chair, was an extinction.
▪ Wittgenstein was a whizzkid who wanted to be an aviator and ended up teaching philosophy at Cambridge from a green deck chair.
▪ My next target was the deck chair area, which was liberally sprinkled with coins.
control
▪ He turned some dials on the control deck in front of him.
▪ Sometimes, during lonely hours on the control deck, Bowman would listen to this radiation.
▪ There were anxious minutes of waiting, then, for the two watchers on the control deck.
▪ It was almost time for the morning changeover, and normally he would wait until Bowman joined him on the control deck.
flight
▪ The Doctor was marched on to the flight deck of the F61 at pistol point.
▪ I watched the edge of the flight deck move un-der us through the chin bubble at my feet.
▪ Upon the flight deck of the leading Cerean man o' war, the Starship Sandra, stood the Captain.
▪ In a moment the flight deck is an inferno of aviation fuel.
▪ The forward attachment point is under the shuttle's nose about half way between the tip and the flight deck windows.
▪ It meant long hours for the pilots, flight deck crews, repair crews and cooks.
▪ She stepped up on to the flight deck, Marco close behind her.
▪ Ammunition from the burning aircraft on the flight deck starts cooking off, spraying the deck with shrapnel.
observation
▪ None of those stranded at the observation deck and restaurant on top were injured.
passenger
▪ Lift from the car-deck on Sally Star goes to all floors; on Sally Sky to the main passenger deck only.
promenade
▪ Inset Watching the world go by from the observation or promenade deck of an Empire Flying-boat, 1930s.
shoe
▪ She began to drift and was just dozing off when she heard the squeak of Nathan's deck shoes on the ladder.
▪ Some are in deck shoes, some are in sandals, me in my flip-flops.
▪ Classic leather deck shoes are blue or white, but you can buy canvas versions in just about any colour you like.
▪ I had begun wearing deck shoes because the soles of my feet had turned dead white as a result of going barefoot.
▪ A major advantage of deck shoes is their price - you can easily pick up a pair for a fiver.
tape
▪ But there are several proprietary packages which will run with most tape decks.
▪ A tape deck played a Beethoven symphony and children played with Fisher-Price toys.
▪ The lights were still on, and a cassette was clicking in a tape deck.
▪ Above the subwoofer is a 25-year-old reel-to-reel tape deck of the kind used in broadcast studios.
teak
▪ Like the Esperanza, a Victorian steam boat, complete with original oak timbers and teak deck.
▪ Ellen meanwhile cleared the foam from the teak deck, then searched Wavebreaker's cabins.
■ VERB
build
▪ Now he's making a good living building decks out of hardwood for second-home people, who are proliferating.
▪ The next part of building the deck, installing the railing and balusters, is not difficult.
▪ Players collect ornately illustrated cards, representing lands, spells, creatures and artifacts, build a deck and battle other players.
▪ The last step is building stairs from the deck down to the lawn.
▪ We wrote recently about building a deck, and many readers have responded with questions and anecdotes about deck experiences.
▪ The pressure-treated wood used in building decks needs attention at each step.
clear
▪ Hankin cleared the decks when in temporary charge and team-strengthening is essential.
▪ I suppose it clears the deck of suspects.
▪ Still, it was time to clear the decks, time to get things sorted.
▪ And Lawrence wasted no time responding to that challenge and clearing the decks at Ayresome Park.
drop
▪ Doctors were flown to the ship by helicopter and several were dropped on to the deck.
▪ Queequeg picks this fellow up, tosses him high in the air, catches him, and drops him to the deck.
▪ Something was not quite right, so without hesitation he dropped down on to the deck.
▪ The man then had to drop down on deck and arrange the boxes more carefully.
▪ They just ran, Delaney leading, dropping from deck to deck until they reached the engine room ladder.
fall
▪ She was falling to the deck, and he was falling with her, his arms tight around her.
▪ They fall to the deck silent when struck.
▪ He threw himself at me and I jumped to one side, leaving him to fall on the deck.
▪ He fell over on the deck and began to cry.
▪ Suddenly he fell on the wet deck, and he caught the side of the ship with his hands.
▪ She laughed hysterically as Piper grunted with pain and fell to the deck.
▪ There was a great crash, and Daniel and all the sailors fell to the deck.
hit
▪ He hit the deck, moulding himself into the shadow as a matter of conditioned reflex.
▪ The champ took a dive, hit the deck, and split wide Open.
▪ The first player can hit the deck but the support, as it drives over, must all stay on its feet.
▪ As the two men hit the deck, Leese went.
▪ As Delaney and Forster hit the deck they caught a fleeting glimpse of the crazed man going for it again.
▪ Steady as she goes. Hit the deck.
reach
▪ They raced up the steps, reaching the first deck, wheeled round, and ran down the corridor.
▪ A small fortune will await the man who can reach the upper deck.
▪ Switched on it remained silent, until they reached the deck.
sit
▪ Hilbert and Lewis and Beryl sat in old-fashioned deck chairs with striped canvas seats.
▪ Quincy and I sit out on the deck and read for hours at a stretch.
▪ Trent sat on the saloon deck, holding his coffee mug cupped in his hands.
▪ He sat on the deck and smoked cheroots.
▪ He and Farquhar sat on the deck side by side, panting and groaning.
▪ Often we will come out and have breakfast or dinner, or sit on the deck at night.
sitting
▪ He was sitting on the top deck of a London bus when the idea came to him.
▪ Donald was sitting in a deck chair in his garden next door, when part of the chimney fell on him.
▪ Mr Sargent was in the next door garden, sitting in a deck chair and reading the newspaper.
▪ She was sitting on the top deck and was cut and bruised by branches.
▪ I was sitting on the deck, my back exposed to the sun.
stack
▪ The real blame lies with the licence granted to employers by a statutory regime which stacks every deck in their favour.
▪ One set of figures shook me awake: Zorig had been right about the stacked deck.
stand
▪ She had the sail up and stood on the sun deck, her black eyes bright with bliss.
▪ A moment more, and we see Bradley standing on deck, swinging his hat to show that he is all right.
▪ I stood on the deck, watching the two spires of Dun Laoghaire receding into the distance.
▪ A few of the gentlemen passengers stood on the upper deck and watched them impassively.
▪ He stood on the deck of the ship, and looked at the sea.
▪ After Stubb goes below, Ahab stands alone on the deck.
▪ It was difficult to stand on the deck, because the wind was so strong.
▪ Throughout the passage, Ahab stands on the deck as if transfixed, staring blindly ahead into the wind and sleet.
walk
▪ Ahab abandons his watch and walks about the deck finally coming to rest against the rail.
watch
▪ I stood on the deck, watching the two spires of Dun Laoghaire receding into the distance.
▪ A few of the gentlemen passengers stood on the upper deck and watched them impassively.
▪ Another young man in nothing but a tan lay on the deck watching her through sunglasses.
▪ From the deck I watch him negotiate the path to the outhouse, his mouth turned down distastefully.
▪ We were on the forward deck, watching the boats watch us.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
all hands on deck
▪ It's all hands on deck as the crew work as team to make the show look its best.
▪ It was all hands on deck as they worked flat out over a weekend in March.
clear the decks
▪ We're trying to clear the decks before Christmas.
▪ And Lawrence wasted no time responding to that challenge and clearing the decks at Ayresome Park.
▪ Hankin cleared the decks when in temporary charge and team-strengthening is essential.
▪ Still, it was time to clear the decks, time to get things sorted.
hit the dirt/the deck
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a seat on the upper deck
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A few of the gentlemen passengers stood on the upper deck and watched them impassively.
▪ At their feet the edge of the net began to shift off the deck.
▪ I was sitting on the deck, my back exposed to the sun.
▪ She clutched the rail to steady herself, reached the deck and went to the closed doors of the lounge.
▪ The decks were slippery with blood, and arms and legs and chunks of flesh were strewed about.
▪ The sea grew more turbulent and the waves began to break over the deck.
▪ The sound of footsteps on the deck above her head brought her fully awake.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
all hands on deck
▪ It's all hands on deck as the crew work as team to make the show look its best.
▪ It was all hands on deck as they worked flat out over a weekend in March.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Bill decked a drunk guy who spilled his drink on Bobbie.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Oi luv, you're supposed to deck the halls, not wreck the walls.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Deck

Deck \Deck\ (d[e^]k), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Decked (d[e^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. Decking.] [D. dekken to cover; akin to E. thatch. See Thatch.]

  1. To cover; to overspread.

    To deck with clouds the uncolored sky.
    --Milton.

  2. To dress, as the person; to clothe; especially, to clothe with more than ordinary elegance; to array; to adorn; to embellish.

    Syn: adorn, decorate, grace, embellish, ornament, beautify.

    Deck thyself now with majesty and excellency.
    --Job xl. 10.

    And deck my body in gay ornaments.
    --Shak.

    The dew with spangles decked the ground.
    --Dryden.

  3. To furnish with a deck, as a vessel.

  4. to knock down (a person) with a forceful blow; as, He decked his opponent with a single punch.

    Syn: coldcock, dump, knock down, floor.

Deck

Deck \Deck\, n. [D. dek. See Deck, v.]

  1. The floorlike covering of the horizontal sections, or compartments, of a ship. Small vessels have only one deck; larger ships have two or three decks. Note: The following are the more common names of the decks of vessels having more than one. Berth deck (Navy), a deck next below the gun deck, where the hammocks of the crew are swung. Boiler deck (River Steamers), the deck on which the boilers are placed. Flush deck, any continuous, unbroken deck from stem to stern. Gun deck (Navy), a deck below the spar deck, on which the ship's guns are carried. If there are two gun decks, the upper one is called the main deck, the lower, the lower gun deck; if there are three, one is called the middle gun deck. Half-deck, that portion of the deck next below the spar deck which is between the mainmast and the cabin. Hurricane deck (River Steamers, etc.), the upper deck, usually a light deck, erected above the frame of the hull. Orlop deck, the deck or part of a deck where the cables are stowed, usually below the water line. Poop deck, the deck forming the roof of a poop or poop cabin, built on the upper deck and extending from the mizzenmast aft. Quarter-deck, the part of the upper deck abaft the mainmast, including the poop deck when there is one. Spar deck.

    1. Same as the upper deck.

    2. Sometimes a light deck fitted over the upper deck.

      Upper deck, the highest deck of the hull, extending from stem to stern.

  2. (arch.) The upper part or top of a mansard roof or curb roof when made nearly flat.

  3. (Railroad) The roof of a passenger car.

  4. A pack or set of playing cards.

    The king was slyly fingered from the deck.
    --Shak.

  5. A heap or store. [Obs.]

    Who . . . hath such trinkets Ready in the deck.
    --Massinger.

  6. (A["e]ronautics) A main a["e]roplane surface, esp. of a biplane or multiplane.

  7. the portion of a bridge which serves as the roadway.

  8. a flat platform adjacent to a house, usually without a roof; -- it is typically used for relaxing out of doors, outdoor cooking, or entertaining guests.

    Between decks. See under Between.

    Deck bridge (Railroad Engineering), a bridge which carries the track upon the upper chords; -- distinguished from a through bridge, which carries the track upon the lower chords, between the girders.

    Deck curb (Arch.), a curb supporting a deck in roof construction.

    Deck floor (Arch.), a floor which serves also as a roof, as of a belfry or balcony.

    Deck hand, a sailor hired to help on the vessel's deck, but not expected to go aloft.

    Deck molding (Arch.), the molded finish of the edge of a deck, making the junction with the lower slope of the roof.

    Deck roof (Arch.), a nearly flat roof which is not surmounted by parapet walls.

    Deck transom (Shipbuilding), the transom into which the deck is framed.

    To clear the decks (Naut.), to remove every unnecessary incumbrance in preparation for battle; to prepare for action.

    To sweep the deck (Card Playing), to clear off all the stakes on the table by winning them.

Wikipedia

Deck

Deck may refer to:

Deck (building)

In architecture, a deck is a flat surface capable of supporting weight, similar to a floor, but typically constructed outdoors, often elevated from the ground, and usually connected to a building. The term is a generalization of decks as found on ships.

Deck (ship)

A deck is a permanent covering over a compartment or a hull of a ship. On a boat or ship, the primary or upper deck is the horizontal structure that forms the "roof" of the hull, strengthening it and serving as the primary working surface. Vessels often have more than one level both within the hull and in the superstructure above the primary deck, similar to the floors of a multi-story building, that are also referred to as decks, as are certain compartments and decks built over specific areas of the superstructure. Decks for some purposes have specific names.

Deck (bridge)

A bridge deck or road bed is the roadway, or the pedestrian walkway, surface of a bridge, and is one structural element of the superstructure of a bridge. It is not to be confused with any deck of a ship. The deck may be constructed of concrete, steel, open grating, or wood. Sometimes the deck is covered with asphalt concrete or other pavement. The concrete deck may be an integral part of the bridge structure ( T-beam or double tee structure) or it may be supported with I-beams or steel girders.

When a bridge deck is installed in a through truss, it is sometimes called a floor system. A suspended bridge deck will be suspended from the main structural elements on a suspension or arch bridge. On some bridges, such as a tied-arch or a cable-stayed, the deck is a primary structural element, carrying tension or compression to support the span.

Deck (surname)

Deck is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Brian Deck, American record producer
  • Gabriel Deck (born 1995), Argentine basketball player
  • John N. Deck (1921–1979), Canadian philosopher
  • Nathan Deck (born 1990), Canadian ice hockey player
  • René Deck (born 1945), Swiss footballer
  • Ronnie Deck (born 1977), American baseball player
  • Théodore Deck, 19th century French ceramicist
  • Woody Deck (born 1983), American poker player
Wiktionary

deck

Etymology 1 n. 1 Any flat surface that can be walked on: a balcony; a porch; a raised patio; a flat rooftop. 2 (lb en nautical) The floorlike covering of the horizontal sections, or compartments, of a ship. Small vessels have only one deck; larger ships have two or three decks. 3 (cx aviation English) A main aeroplane surface, especially of a biplane or multiplane. 4 A pack or set of playing cards. 5 A set of slides for a presentation. 6 (lb en obsolete) A heap or store. vb. 1 (context uncommon English) To furnish with a deck, as a vessel. 2 (context informal English) To knock someone to the floor, especially with a single punch. Etymology 2

vb. 1 (context transitive sometimes with ''out'' English) To dress up (someone) up, to clothe with more than ordinary elegance 2 (context transitive with ''out'' English) To decorate (something). 3 To cover; to overspread.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

deck

"covering over part of a ship," mid-15c., perhaps a shortening of Middle Low German verdeck (or a related North Sea Germanic word), a nautical word, from ver- "fore" + decken "to cover, put under roof," from Proto-Germanic *thackjam (related to thatch, q.v.).\n

\nSense extended early in English from "covering" to "platform of a ship." "Pack of cards" is 1590s, perhaps because they were stacked like decks of a ship. Deck chair (1884) so called because they were used on ocean liners. Tape deck (1949) is in reference to the flat surface of old reel-to-reel tape recorders.

deck

"knock down," c.1953, probably from deck (n.) on the notion of laying someone out on the deck. Related: Decked; decking.\n

deck

"adorn" (as in deck the halls), early 15c., from Middle Dutch dekken "to cover," from the same Germanic root as deck (n.). Meaning "to cover" is from 1510s in English. Replaced Old English þeccan. Related: Decked; decking.\n

WordNet

deck

  1. v. be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere" [syn: adorn, decorate, grace, embellish, beautify]

  2. decorate; "deck the halls with holly" [syn: bedight, bedeck]

  3. knock down with force; "He decked his opponent" [syn: coldcock, dump, knock down, floor]

deck

  1. n. any of various floor-like platforms built into a vessel

  2. street name for a packet of illegal drugs

  3. a pack of 52 playing cards [syn: pack of cards, deck of cards]

  4. a porch that resembles the deck on a ship

Usage examples of "deck".

The Christmas party was in full swing when Augusta boarded: a band played on the main deck, and passengers in evening dress drank champagne and danced with friends who had come to say good-bye.

Even the decks of cards used at the blackjack and poker tables were specially printed, with the Twelve Apostles replacing the face cards, the Dove of the Holy Spirit replacing the aces, Jesus instead of the Joker, and the Fairchild Ministry logo on the back.

GMT Room 512, Deck 5 Bouddica Alpha The telephone rang, a jarring, explosive sound, and Adler looked up from the shaking, whimpering girl, irritated.

Coyote killed the afterburner, then snapped the Tomcat into a wingover which sent the heavy aircraft plunging toward the cloud deck in an inverted dive.

The raised bridge, the aftercastle and observation decks and lounges, became steep knolls skinned in topsoil.

There were six men about on the deck, watching the sail or keeping lookout, rand the steersman on the steerboard side of the aftercastle raised a hand to Thorsten to signal all was well as he and Aylwin climbed the ladder to the higher deck.

They went down from the aftercastle again, and into a small cabin sandwiched between it and the main deck, where they shared a meal of dried meat and hard biscuit, washed down with ale.

Vannier and Ferris to get into the lifeboat, called to McKinnon to cast off aft, and half-ran, half-stumbled up the heeling, slippery deck to where the girl and the soldier stood half-way between the aftercastle screen door and the ladder leading to the poop-deck above.

A large and fairly comfortable cabin was built into the afterpart of the ship, partly lowered into the hold to give it more headroom without rising too high above the deck.

They were sitting on the deck, under the lee of the bulwark, in the afterpart of the ship, close against the shelter of the aftercastle.

Set adjacent to my hotel was Gringos, an establishment of bamboo and thatch above a concrete deck and open to the aira tourist bar that, since there were no tourists, catered chiefly to expatriates and young Honduran women.

There was a deck of cumulus far below but through big breaks, the pilots could see the deeply indented coastline of the Takao area and the big concrete airdrome of Einansho.

Now the only control the crew on the flight deck could exert over their fate was through the limited influence of airfoil surfaces on thin air.

All were fully decked, which meant the oarsmen sat within the hull, an ordeal more endurable because they were housed in an outrigger that projected them well over the water, made it easier and airier to row.

The deck crew scurried about, sometimes appearing to be some sort of huge, brightly colored colonial or amebic creature moving with urgent purpose rather than a scattered group of tired, hard-worked men and women.