Find the word definition

Crossword clues for date

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
date
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a delivery date/time
▪ The normal delivery time is 7 – 10 days after you place your order.
a departure date (also date of departure)
▪ You cannot make a change to your booking within six weeks of your departure date.
a lunch date (=when you meet someone for lunch)
▪ I've got a lunch date.
a target date
▪ There is no target date set for completion of the new project.
a trial date
▪ No trial date has been set because of procedural delays.
bang up to date
▪ The technology is bang up to date.
blind date
▪ Would you ever go on a blind date?
carbon dating
closing date
▪ The closing date for applications is 6 August.
completion date
▪ The project has a completion date of December 22nd.
cut-off date/point/score etc (=the date etc when you stop doing something)
▪ The cut-off date for registration is July 2.
date from the 18th etc century (=it was started, built etc in the 18th etc century)
▪ The present church dates from the 13th century.
date rape
date stamp
dating agency
day/date/time of purchase
▪ This product should be consumed on the day of purchase.
double date
drop dead date
due date
▪ Fewer than five percent of women have their babies on their due date.
International Date Line
Internet dating (=using the Internet to meet people for a romantic relationship)
▪ Internet dating websites are becoming increasingly popular.
Internet dating
past...sell-by date
▪ This type of games console is starting to look well past its sell-by date.
past...sell-by date
▪ a yoghurt two days past its sell-by date
play date
radioactive dating
radiocarbon dating
retirement date
▪ My actual retirement date is July 10.
sb’s date of birthespecially BrE, sb’s birth date especially AmE (= the day, month and year you were born)
▪ Please give your name, address, and date of birth.
scheduled...date
▪ We will not cancel your holiday less than eight weeks before the scheduled departure date.
sell-by date
▪ a yoghurt two days past its sell-by date
set a date/time
▪ No date has been set for the election.
speed dating
the exact date
▪ He plans to retire soon, but the exact date is not fixed.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
blind
▪ Or a blind date with Black Francis??
▪ They met on a blind date.
▪ Once seated, Denice tells us she's only been on a blind date once before, and that was years ago.
▪ In mid-September, he met Pamela Digby on a blind date and proposed.
▪ They chose their high-flying ceremony after a blind date and party brought them together.
closing
▪ And providing you are eligible and you reply by the closing date, your acceptance into the Personal Accident Plan is guaranteed.
▪ The closing dates were strictly adhered to by the Office of Works.
▪ Any entries made after the closing date will be disqualified.
▪ The closing date for applications is 1 December 1990.
▪ They also put a closing date on the offer which meant there was no time to try again.
▪ There are 30 places available on a first come, first served basis; the closing date is Friday 15 March.
▪ The closing date for submissions was 7 November 1988.
▪ The fact that closing date for entries was 28 January seems to have escaped its notice.
due
▪ It was less than satisfying; and yet as his due date neared he kept on, sometimes all night.
▪ The amount and due date will be announced in advance.
▪ The new Jan. 22 due date also applies to taxpayers in Washington, Mr Keith adds.
▪ The covenant to pay the rent on the due date, quarterly in advance usually, is absolutely fundamental.
▪ The due date coincides with the closing ceremonies in Atlanta.
▪ My first child arrived quite quickly on the due date.
▪ Only a significantly wrong due date separates Lou Madden from a perfect Super Bowl attendance record.
early
▪ From an early date the imperial palaces at Constantinople incorporated decorative schemes that emphasized and glorified imperial power and dominion.
▪ Some people felt that he should have removed McClellan from command at an early date.
▪ The design and printing of the posters should be discussed at an early date with the Cartographic Unit.
▪ The technique is free and realistic for such an early date.
▪ Rather its provisions will deem the transfer to be treated as if it took place on an earlier specified date.
▪ Day-to-day government was from an early date conducted by an officer called a seneschal, with vice-ducal powers, and a council.
▪ I hope to arrange for the Broadcasting Committee to consider the issue at an early date.
▪ Does anyone know the earliest date that a cuckoo has been heard?
exact
▪ Details of exact dates of birth and death recorded here provide information not available in any public record. 24.
▪ The exact date for the closing has not been set.
▪ The exact date of the beginning of our post-imperial era is, however, relatively unimportant.
▪ D., continuously increase toward an end-the Second Comingwhose exact date in the future remains unknown.
▪ The exact date of its original building is disputed but it probably stems from the late fifth or early sixth century.
▪ The exact date was etched in memory because it was Day Five of my aborted Month of Celibacy.
▪ Nor is it so regular that we can trust to it altogether to fix the exact date of any given work.
▪ Peres is expected to announce an exact date next week.
future
▪ In addition, or alternatively, they may be redeemable, thus promising cash from the company at a future date.
▪ Admission is $ 4 a person. Future dance dates are April 20 and May 11.
▪ Be sure at some future date you will regret it if you don't.
▪ At some future date it might become necessary for Anna Beckett to be admitted to a private asylum.
▪ Albert Hanson has details about future dates on.
▪ Firstly, loan demand must come from creditworthy customers who can guarantee loan repayment at a future date.
▪ It is a matter best addressed at a future date in the light of the experience of the self-governing colleges.
▪ Watch the Gig Guide for details of future dates.
late
▪ He might well have formed his own opinion but he knew that would not bear cross-examination at some later date.
▪ Or how about a vital organ being removed and the opt-out card being found at a later date?
▪ Allowing some children to enter school at a later date gives them more time to play.
▪ Some firms are very flexible on this issue and where possible, allow them to relocate at a later date.
▪ Like any investments, they can be enhanced, even at a late date, by further contributions of time and effort.
▪ This is particularly important if any query arises upon any of the answers given at a later date.
▪ This was the latest in date from Viola to Walter.
■ NOUN
birth
▪ They filed in, giving birth dates and names.
▪ He kept his birth date a mystery, but according to the Baseball Encyclopedia he already was 42.
▪ From Seymour Direct, it has easy-to-read numbers and is personalised with the child's name and birth date.
▪ It asks my birth date, if I have any children and my marital status.
completion
▪ Market Tests with target completion date of end of September 1993 Note: 1.
▪ Their target completion date is late 1990.
▪ Supply agreements with key customers which are due for renewal shortly after the intended completion date.
▪ The final completion date for the whole project is 2003.
▪ From this information, a job completion date is produced: The target is achievable, but only by hard work.
▪ Among their criteria: Cancel any project that remains unfinished more than 20 years past its original completion date.
▪ This provision may cause confusion to clients as they will not understand that it only relates to a late completion date.
▪ When you've got your completion date, you can breath a sigh of relief - and get your removal firm organised.
delivery
▪ The delivery date for the futures contract is 30 June.
▪ Similar relationships hold for cycles of futures contracts with different delivery dates, as shown in Fig. 8.2.
▪ Poor delivery dates and servicing facilities are further factors to which empirical studies have attached major, even primary importance.
▪ At this stage you should also get a delivery date.
▪ Corridor's platform will allow retailers to inform their customers of precise delivery dates through online links to manufacturers and distributors.
▪ Where a delivery date had not been provided a shocking 59 per cent of goods were never delivered.
▪ Before the delivery date, the buyer made a sub-contract to sell similar goods at 65s. per ton.
▪ Confirm delivery date and make sure you send written confirmation of all the details.
expiration
▪ The expiration date is no more than fourteen days later than the date of grading.
▪ In August that year $ 25 million worth of vaccine was backlogged and in danger of passing its six-month expiration date.
▪ Beer makers such as Anheuser-Busch complained two years ago that the county was selling beer past its expiration date.
▪ The certificate, which is good at any of the restaurants, has no expiration date.
▪ Guidelines require that an expiration date appear on every page of an Internet-Draft.
▪ Winemakers, you already know that consumers need expiration dates on certain wines.
expiry
▪ Check the expiry date on the packet.
▪ My Visa number is expiry date 09/94.
▪ The block exemptions are subject to review, since they have expiry dates written in, but no substantial change is imminent.
▪ The company is currently seeking agreement, and an extension of its credit agreement beyond the current June 30 expiry date.
▪ Profit diagrams can only be intelligibly drawn for strategies involving investments with the same expiry dates.
▪ These forms are filed alphabetically, the expiry date carefully noted and systematically cleared out after the expiry date has elapsed.
▪ His defence, to start with, was the circular from the Tripoli Committee extending the expiry date on the milk.
publication
▪ The publication date of the Bennett Report was brought forward.
▪ The novel, with an official publication date of mid-June, should be in bookstores by the end of May.
▪ The new publication date of January, which will now become the norm, is the result of widespread demand from centres.
▪ Corrected stock will be sent out in time for a new publication date.
▪ Watch out for a change in publication dates for Courtauld News.
▪ Both journals, however, review books well after publication date.
▪ Two other valid criteria for weeding may be employed in conjunction with use and publication date.
radiocarbon
▪ This is most frequently applied to radiocarbon dates from tree-rings.
▪ To correct this error radiocarbon dates are calibrated by studying the difference between radiocarbon dates and tree-ring dates.
▪ The journal Radiocarbon publishes the most up-to-date curves which in principle permit the conversion of radiocarbon dates to calibrated dates.
rape
▪ The Government is considering new laws to counter date rape and to improve the way rape cases are handled.
▪ All freshmen who attend optional orientation sessions receive information on date rape.
▪ The tag is just as self-explanatory as date rape-if not more so.
▪ She talks about relationships and the dangers of date rape.
▪ Merrill points out that most often rape on college campuses is date rape, but that date rape is rape.
▪ The research on date rape has helped shape prevention programs, but with few results.
target
▪ The target date has now been moved to 1 January 1994.
▪ December 1998 is the target date for completion of all the improvements.
▪ The absence of a target date by which the Protestant/Catholic unemployment differential would be significantly reduced is partly explained by this.
▪ The target date to begin providing services is July.
▪ It may be that August 1 would now have to be a more realistic target date.
▪ Mr Mates replies that the target date for doing so at Belfast Prison is not until the year 2000.
▪ The long-awaited supercomputer had been promised for last year, but the target date was later pushed back to October 1993.
▪ The target date has been postponed to 2015.
■ VERB
fix
▪ She said she loved him, they said they loved him, but somehow nobody would fix a date for a marriage.
▪ He added that while Yeltsin is breathing somewhat easier than he had been, there is no fixed date for his discharge.
▪ Ernest's got to fix the date with the Registrar.
▪ This information also served as the basis for fixing with exactness the dates of major religious observances such as Easter.
▪ Nor is it so regular that we can trust to it altogether to fix the exact date of any given work.
▪ Trial was fixed for a later date.
▪ The court will either grant the request on written application or fix a date for hearing.
▪ They fixed a date for the weekend and he kissed her goodbye.
give
▪ Not giving dates lets the story have a more relaxed and timeless feel about it.
▪ They named names and gave dates.
▪ A single obsidian artifact can not be expected to give a reliable date.
▪ Volcanic rocks cool quickly, trap the argon, and so give good dates.
▪ Just before he left, Creed had given him the date.
▪ However, he declined to give the specific date, citing security concerns.
▪ They filed in, giving birth dates and names.
▪ The businessman leant across to an enormous, leather-bound diary and gave the date in early March.
issue
▪ Further details will be issued at a later date.
schedule
▪ They were despatched exactly to schedule and from that date further deliveries were also made exactly to programme.
▪ Put a price tag beside each tactic and schedule the date you hope to have that tactic accomplished successfully.
▪ S., it is economically impossible to produce extra copies after our scheduled publishing date.
set
▪ Under this pressure the Modrow government set an election date of 18 March 1990.
▪ The administration has 30 days to set a date for talks.
▪ We set a date for the following May and started making plans.
▪ After the initial excitement of announcing the engagement and setting a date, planning the event begins.
▪ Bureau of Prisons set the execution date Jan. 16 after he dropped all appeals.
▪ In general, you will find it easier to use T to set the date and time.
▪ Once the revised time schedule is established, the proposal writer should set his dates of completion for each task.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a hot date
▪ It was like taking Warren Beatty and Sean Penn with you on a hot date.
▪ Now the single girl has even managed to score a hot date-through blatant flirting.
expiration date
▪ Beer makers such as Anheuser-Busch complained two years ago that the county was selling beer past its expiration date.
▪ Guidelines require that an expiration date appear on every page of an Internet-Draft.
▪ In August that year $ 25 million worth of vaccine was backlogged and in danger of passing its six-month expiration date.
▪ The expiration date is no more than fourteen days later than the date of grading.
▪ The certificate, which is good at any of the restaurants, has no expiration date.
▪ Winemakers, you already know that consumers need expiration dates on certain wines.
expiry date
▪ Check the expiry date on the packet.
▪ His defence, to start with, was the circular from the Tripoli Committee extending the expiry date on the milk.
▪ My Visa number is expiry date 09/94.
▪ Profit diagrams can only be intelligibly drawn for strategies involving investments with the same expiry dates.
▪ The block exemptions are subject to review, since they have expiry dates written in, but no substantial change is imminent.
▪ The company is currently seeking agreement, and an extension of its credit agreement beyond the current June 30 expiry date.
▪ These forms are filed alphabetically, the expiry date carefully noted and systematically cleared out after the expiry date has elapsed.
fix a time/date/place etc
▪ Before fixing a date do some research.
▪ Employers generally fix a time limit on the payment of these allowances.
▪ He added that while Yeltsin is breathing somewhat easier than he had been, there is no fixed date for his discharge.
▪ She said she loved him, they said they loved him, but somehow nobody would fix a date for a marriage.
▪ The court will either grant the request on written application or fix a date for hearing.
▪ The court will then fix a date for consideration and serve notice on the applicant.
▪ The court will usually fix a time limit for service when making directions and this must be complied with.
▪ They fixed a date for the weekend and he kissed her goodbye.
heavy date
▪ They mentioned that you and Anna walked a hundred miles and that you were following it up with a heavy date.
name the day/date
the name/date/title etc escapes sb
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Snow White" had a December release date to capture the Christmas market.
▪ "What's the date today?" "September twenty-ninth."
▪ A date for his release has not yet been agreed.
▪ Are you sure these yoghurts are ok? Have you checked the expiry date?
▪ Could I have your name and your date of birth please?
▪ Do you know the date when the house was built?
▪ Give me the dates of the American War of Independence.
▪ Have they set a date for the wedding yet?
▪ I later received confirmation of my new job in a letter indicating the start date.
▪ It helps if you provide your birth date and Social Security number.
▪ June 9th is the date of the European elections.
▪ Key in your credit card details, including the expiration date of the card.
▪ The date on the newspaper is October 12, 1966.
▪ The closing date for entries is 3 March 2001.
▪ Was that your first date?
▪ We need to arrange a date for the next meeting.
▪ We still haven't received notification of the exam date.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Best when aged 3 to 5 years from vintage date.
▪ But analysts say such familiar complaints are largely out of date.
▪ In 1941, Roosevelt conceded failure and Congress summoned the courage to codify the date in law.
▪ It is a difficult date to establish and is not frequently used, although it appears on packaged dry yeast. 4.
▪ Starting dates, after two exceptionally early seasons, have returned to the more traditional early July point.
▪ The change in market value of certificates held at 31 December is simply the product of applying accrued interest at that date.
▪ You are still entitled to a dividend on the redemption date.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
back
▪ Most of the alleged incidents occurred during 1985-89, with some dating back to the late 1970s.
▪ Around forty senior figures from the Catholic church attended the ceremony which dates back many centuries.
▪ Some of his compositions are based on songs dating back to the mid-fifteenth century.
▪ One dated back to 1994 and another regarded contracts from 1998 that had already been the focus of a Star expos.
▪ This case relied on law dating back to the 1870s.
to
▪ It dates to about 1780 and looks as if it has landed by magic carpet.
▪ The hoard can therefore be dated to about 625, some thirty years earlier than ha previously been thought.
■ NOUN
century
▪ It dates from mid-twelfth century and is nearly 50 feet high, built in six stages.
▪ This office dated from the twelfth century and had originally been mainly concerned with the administration of the rulers' demesne lands.
▪ According to an apocryphal work dating from the third century, Thomas's mission takes him even further.
▪ Its congregation dates back nearly a century more.
▪ It is a small Stately Home mostly dating from the eighteenth century, but bits of it go back to Elizabethan times.
▪ Its decisive decline is often said to have dated from the thirteenth century.
days
▪ It was dated three days before Riddle's disappearance.
▪ A letter dated two days from then.
▪ Voice over Dinmore Manor is on the site of a Knights Hospital dating back to the days of the crusades.
▪ The system is based on the view, dating from the days of elementary schools, that education is simple.
letter
▪ In 1884 a large cache of his letters dating from 1643 to 1648 was discovered, and some have been printed.
▪ The letter was dated November 1870.
▪ The letter was dated four weeks before.
▪ In a long blue-envelope letter to Dominy, dated February 3, 1965, Stamm delivered his report.
▪ As he wrote in a revealing letter dated 20 September 1963: To go there is to destroy the magic.
▪ A letter dated two days from then.
▪ The letter was dated Dec. 28, but was released by the group only yesterday.
method
▪ The precision of the method when used to date tooth enamel is in the order of 10-20 percent.
▪ Aiding his efforts was an improved method for dating rock known as uranium-lead isotope analysis.
▪ But they have also been-and to a limited extent still are-important as a method of relative dating.
▪ Other methods for dating rock art are being explored.
▪ Radiocarbon Dating Radiocarbon is the single most useful method of dating for the archaeologist.
▪ After this pretreatment, the sample is converted to a form suitable for the particular method of radiocarbon dating to be used.
period
▪ It is thought to date to the Hadrianic period.
▪ Spontaneous decay of radioactive atoms in rocks gives absolute ages that date the geologic periods and the origin of the Earth.
▪ This situation, although made worse by the war, was a cumulative problem dating from the period of colonial dependency.
radiocarbon
▪ Most errors in radiocarbon dating arise because the excavator has not fully understood the formation processes of the context in question.
▪ For direct archaeological applications, radiocarbon dating and tree-ring work are in general much more useful.
▪ In one comparative study, over 30 radiocarbon laboratories dated the same sample.
▪ After this pretreatment, the sample is converted to a form suitable for the particular method of radiocarbon dating to be used.
▪ Conventional radiocarbon dating normally requires sample sizes which will yield a minimum of 1 g of carbon.
times
▪ Some of these have rectangular layouts of streets which seem to date from late Saxon times, as at Winchester and Guildford.
▪ Tirthankaras, dating back to prehistoric times.
▪ This dated back to Roman times when bachelors led the bride to the ceremony and married men escorted her back.
▪ Meir Ahronson sat in an old armchair, a piece of furniture that dated back to the times of King Sobieski.
▪ Three interesting features inside are the box pews, the semi-circular altar rail, and the stone lectern dating from Norman times.
▪ According to other accounts, the Dositheans were a sect dating back to Maccabaean times.
▪ Its present course can almost certainly be dated from late Saxon times.
▪ They dated a few times but when she fell pregnant Ahmed abandoned her.
work
▪ Statistical accounts of those whose benefits have been cut under the Actively Seeking Work legislation to date were provided.
▪ In this anthology the earliest poems included were some previously unpublished works dating from 1916 to 1921.
▪ It is also unquestionably Banks' best work to date.
▪ The cost of the work to date has been about £150 million.
▪ Each Agency will make a brief presentation of its work to date and its plans for the future.
▪ According to an apocryphal work dating from the third century, Thomas's mission takes him even further.
▪ Again, this information was informative and served as a fairly comprehensive review of the work reported to date using these systems.
▪ The interior surfaces are painted with work dating mainly from 1815.
years
▪ On the Avon, some of the weirs date back 1,000 years and are in urgent need of restoration.
▪ Smith and Brye had reportedly been dating for several years before breaking off their relationship about two years ago.
▪ But not only does the framing of the existing social services date back twenty years already.
▪ Analysis is complicated by large and small scale cultural features which can date back several thousand years, even in remote areas.
▪ And that could mean the end for the peace camp which dates back eleven years.
▪ The history of wine dates back thousands of years and wild game has been on our tables since mankind searched for food.
■ VERB
bring
▪ Ethan Casey brings us up to date.
▪ Rod brought me up to date.
sign
▪ The drawing was signed and dated in the bottom right-hand comer.
▪ What kind of justice do we have in this country when a signed and dated letter offering a job means nothing?
▪ The report on title must be signed and dated and must indicate the completion date.
▪ The note was signed and dated by the chief agricultural officer, Mr Samuels.
start
▪ When he had first started dating his wife Debbie it certainly had been a bit gruesome.
▪ I tell her she should start dating, go out and have a good time.
▪ He has just started dating Natalie, one of the notorious Appleton sisters.
▪ He has looked a tremendous prospect on both starts to date, and will relish the extra furlong here.
▪ They've barely started dating, and they don't live together.
▪ Finally I backed off-and by then Natalia had started dating some one else and was through with me.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a hot date
▪ It was like taking Warren Beatty and Sean Penn with you on a hot date.
▪ Now the single girl has even managed to score a hot date-through blatant flirting.
expiration date
▪ Beer makers such as Anheuser-Busch complained two years ago that the county was selling beer past its expiration date.
▪ Guidelines require that an expiration date appear on every page of an Internet-Draft.
▪ In August that year $ 25 million worth of vaccine was backlogged and in danger of passing its six-month expiration date.
▪ The expiration date is no more than fourteen days later than the date of grading.
▪ The certificate, which is good at any of the restaurants, has no expiration date.
▪ Winemakers, you already know that consumers need expiration dates on certain wines.
expiry date
▪ Check the expiry date on the packet.
▪ His defence, to start with, was the circular from the Tripoli Committee extending the expiry date on the milk.
▪ My Visa number is expiry date 09/94.
▪ Profit diagrams can only be intelligibly drawn for strategies involving investments with the same expiry dates.
▪ The block exemptions are subject to review, since they have expiry dates written in, but no substantial change is imminent.
▪ The company is currently seeking agreement, and an extension of its credit agreement beyond the current June 30 expiry date.
▪ These forms are filed alphabetically, the expiry date carefully noted and systematically cleared out after the expiry date has elapsed.
heavy date
▪ They mentioned that you and Anna walked a hundred miles and that you were following it up with a heavy date.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Certain styles of music will never date, and will always be popular.
▪ His furniture designs have hardly dated at all.
▪ How long have Paul and Sue been dating?
▪ I thought we were just friends, but when I started dating other men, he suddenly got really jealous.
▪ Oh, I forgot to date the check.
▪ Scientists have not yet dated the human remains found at these megalithic sites.
▪ The internal memo, dated November 13, was from Watkins.
▪ The trouble with high fashion clothes is that they date very quickly.
▪ What is a man his age doing dating a 17-year-old?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ His first publications date from work carried out there.
▪ In this way, the felling date for that piece of timber can usually be dated to within a year.
▪ She was in violation of some deal they had which dated from the moment they agreed to combine households.
▪ The corresponding language of the guarantee and debenture dated 6 June 1985 is somewhat different.
▪ The Los Angeles Times is not responsible for changes in prices, dates or itineraries.
▪ This free-scrolling handle, dating from about 1740, was known as a flying scroll handle.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Date

Date \Date\, n.[F. datte, L. dactylus, fr. Gr. ?, prob. not the same word as da`ktylos finger, but of Semitic origin.] (Bot.) The fruit of the date palm; also, the date palm itself.

Note: This fruit is somewhat in the shape of an olive, containing a soft pulp, sweet, esculent, and wholesome, and inclosing a hard kernel.

Date palm, or Date tree (Bot.), the genus of palms which bear dates, of which common species is Ph[oe]nix dactylifera. See Illust.

Date plum (Bot.), the fruit of several species of Diospyros, including the American and Japanese persimmons, and the European lotus ( Diospyros Lotus).

Date shell, or Date fish (Zo["o]l.), a bivalve shell, or its inhabitant, of the genus Pholas, and allied gener

  1. See Pholas.

Date

Date \Date\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Dated; p. pr. & vb. n. Dating.] [Cf. F. dater. See 2d Date.]

  1. To note the time of writing or executing; to express in an instrument the time of its execution; as, to date a letter, a bond, a deed, or a charter.

  2. To note or fix the time of, as of an event; to give the date of; as, to date the building of the pyramids.

    Note: We may say dated at or from a place.

    The letter is dated at Philadephia.
    --G. T. Curtis.

    You will be suprised, I don't question, to find among your correspondencies in foreign parts, a letter dated from Blois.
    --Addison.

    In the countries of his jornal seems to have been written; parts of it are dated from them.
    --M. Arnold.

Date

Date \Date\, n. [F. date, LL. data, fr. L. datus given, p. p. of dare to give; akin to Gr. ?, OSlaw. dati, Skr. d[=a]. Cf. Datum, Dose, Dato, Die.]

  1. That addition to a writing, inscription, coin, etc., which specifies the time (as day, month, and year) when the writing or inscription was given, or executed, or made; as, the date of a letter, of a will, of a deed, of a coin. etc.

    And bonds without a date, they say, are void.
    --Dryden.

  2. The point of time at which a transaction or event takes place, or is appointed to take place; a given point of time; epoch; as, the date of a battle.

    He at once, Down the long series of eventful time, So fixed the dates of being, so disposed To every living soul of every kind The field of motion, and the hour of rest.
    --Akenside.

  3. Assigned end; conclusion. [R.]

    What Time would spare, from Steel receives its date.
    --Pope.

  4. Given or assigned length of life; dyration. [Obs.]

    Good luck prolonged hath thy date.
    --Spenser.

    Through his life's whole date.
    --Chapman.

    To bear date, to have the date named on the face of it; -- said of a writing.

Date

Date \Date\, v. i. To have beginning; to begin; to be dated or reckoned; -- with from.

The Batavian republic dates from the successes of the French arms.
--E. Everett.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
date

"liaison," 1885, gradually evolving from date (n.1) in its general sense of "appointment;" romantic sense by 1890s. Meaning "person one has a date with" is from 1925.

date

the fruit, late 13c., from Old French date, from Old Provençal datil, from Latin dactylus, from Greek daktylos "date," originally "finger, toe;" so called because of fancied resemblance between oblong fruit of the date palm and human digits. Possibly from a Semitic source (compare Hebrew deqel, Aramaic diqla, Arabic daqal "date palm") and assimilated to the Greek word for "finger."

date

"have a romantic liaison;" 1902, from date (n.3). Related: Dated; dating.

date

"to mark (a document) with the date," late 14c., from date (n.1). Meaning "to assign to or indicate a date" (of an event) is from c.1400. Meaning "to mark as old-fashioned" is from 1895. Related: Dated; dating.

date

"time," early 14c., from Old French date (13c.) "date, day; time," from Medieval Latin data, noun use of fem. singular of Latin datus "given," past participle of dare "to give, grant, offer," from PIE root *do- "to give" (cognates: Sanskrit dadati "gives," danam "offering, present;" Old Persian dadatuv "let him give," Old Church Slavonic dati "give," dani "tribute;" Latin donum "gift;" Greek didomi, didonai, "to give, offer," doron "gift;" Lithuanian duonis "gift," Old Irish dan "gift, endowment, talent," Welsh dawn "gift"). \n

\nThe Roman convention of closing every article of correspondence by writing "given" and the day and month -- meaning perhaps "given to messenger" -- led to data becoming a term for "the time (and place) stated." (a Roman letter would include something along the lines of datum Romae pridie Kalendas Maias -- "given at Rome on the last day of April."

Wiktionary
date

Etymology 1 n. 1 The fruit of the date palm, ''Phoenix dactylifera'', somewhat in the shape of an olive, containing a soft, sweet pulp and enclosing a hard kernel. 2 The date palm. Etymology 2

n. 1 That addition to a writing, inscription, coin, etc., which specifies the time (as day, month, and year) when the writing or inscription was given, or executed, or made. 2 The point of time at which a transaction or event takes place, or is appointed to take place; a given point of time; epoch; as, the '''date''' of a battle. A specific day. 3 A point in time 4 (context rare English) Assigned end; conclusion. 5 (context obsolete English) Given or assigned length of life; duration. 6 A pre-arranged social meeting. 7 A companion when one is partaking in a social occasion. 8 A meeting with a lover or potential lover, or the person so met. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To note the time of writing or executing; to express in an instrument the time of its execution. 2 (context transitive English) To note or fix the time of, as of an event; to give the date of. 3 (context transitive English) To determine the age of something. 4 (context transitive English) To take (someone) on a series of dates. 5 (context transitive English) To have a steady relationship with, to be romantically involved with. 6 (context intransitive English) Of a couple, to be in a romantic relationship. 7 (context intransitive English) To become old, especially in such a way as to fall out of fashion, become less appealing or attractive, etc. 8 (context intransitive with ''from'' English) To have beginning; to begin; to be dated or reckoned.

WordNet
date
  1. v. go on a date with; "Tonight she is dating a former high school sweetheart"

  2. stamp with a date; "The package is dated November 24" [syn: date stamp]

  3. assign a date to; determine the (probable) date of; "Scientists often cannot date precisely archeological or prehistorical findings"

  4. date regularly; have a steady relationship with; "Did you know that she is seeing an older man?"; "He is dating his former wife again!" [syn: go steady, go out, see]

  5. provide with a dateline; mark with a date; "She wrote the letter on Monday but she dated it Saturday so as not to reveal that she procrastinated"

date
  1. n. the specified day of the month; "what is the date today?" [syn: day of the month]

  2. a particular day specified as the time something will happen; "the date of the election is set by law"

  3. a meeting arranged in advance; "she asked how to avoid kissing at the end of a date" [syn: appointment, engagement]

  4. a particular but unspecified point in time; "they hoped to get together at an early date"

  5. the present; "they are up to date"; "we haven't heard from them to date"

  6. a participant in a date; "his date never stopped talking" [syn: escort]

  7. the particular day, month, or year (usually according to the Gregorian calendar) that an event occurred; "he tried to memorizes all the dates for his history class"

  8. sweet edible fruit of the date palm with a single long woody seed

Wikipedia
Date

Date or dates may refer to:

Date (metadata)

In metadata, the term date is a representation term used to specify a calendar date in the Gregorian calendar. Many data representation standards such as XML, XML Schema, Web Ontology Language specify that ISO date format ISO 8601 should be used.

Note that Date should not be confused with the DateAndTime representation term which requires that both the date and time to be supplied.

Date (surname)

is a Japanese surname. It is also a Maharashtrian Surname from India with a similar pronunciation. It can refer to:

Date (band)

Date is a modern dansband from Sweden. The band was established in 1993.

Usage examples of "date".

But for the most part, the kisses the men bestowed upon the customers were deeper than Abie would have considered appropriate after a first date.

Glenn Abies to the pastor over there at the WAR church, dated two years ago this past July.

Although Sapor was in the thirtieth year of his long reign, he was still in the vigor of youth, as the date of his accession, by a very strange fatality, had preceded that of his birth.

From an early date Congress has acted upon the interpretation espoused by Hamilton.

June, 1896, great stress was laid on the fact of the difference in the admixture of inks found on letters contemporaneous with the date of the will, and it was asserted also that the ink with which the will was written was not in existence at the time it was alleged to have been made, June 14, 1873, and probably not earlier than ten years later.

She invited Ronnie to dinner with us, but Ronnie said she had an afterwork date.

Frank had dated her briefly in high school, but the romance never advanced past petting, and Peggy had married a real estate agent the same month Frank went into the academy.

Wehrmacht chiefs and the Foreign Minister were confronted with specific dates for actual aggression against two neighboring countries - an action which they were sure would bring on a European war.

The figure below, as in the corresponding window in the north aisle, is also of later date.

So it is here that we find extraordinarily well-preserved mummies, for example, and an ancient mud brick pueblo, Aldea de Tulor, that dates to about 800 BC.

He will simply allude, in conclusion, to the performances of the Mysterious Foundling, as exhibiting perfection hitherto unparalleled in the Art of Legerdemain, with wonders of untraceable intricacy on the cards, originally the result of abstruse calculations made by that renowned Algebraist, Mohammed Engedi, extending over a period of ten years, dating from the year 1215 of the Arab Chronology.

There is no doubt when Amado Ortega was in Area IV The date was June 23.

In 1832, a treaty, bearing date the 20th of April, was executed between the British government in India and Meermoorad Ali, who at that time was the principal Ameer of Scinde, in which a bond of friendship was entered into, and mutual commerce was agreed upon.

If there was one difficulty about being a patrician of the Julii Caesares, it was that all his seniors to date were only too aware how much greater and more august his ancestry was than theirs.

Media, is overbalanced by the silence of two annalists of a more early date, both Christians, both natives of Egypt, and the most ancient of whom, the patriarch Eutychius, has amply described the conquest of Alexandria.