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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
damn
I.interjection
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a scathing/damning comment (=a very critical one)
▪ There were a lot of scathing comments about the film.
damning evidence (=proving that someone has done something wrong)
▪ Her testimony proved to be the most damning evidence against him.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(as) near as damn it
a (damn/darned/darn) sight more/better etc
▪ Actually, a damn sight more than from that stiff gherkin Smott.
▪ I prefer my women a little older and a damn sight more sober.
▪ If he listened to Anthony Scrivener, he would be a darned sight better.
▪ Perhaps not up there with Wilburforce but a damn sight more daring than anything Diana ever did!
▪ The Galapagos finch was a darn sight more valuable than Sandra Willmot.
▪ We were a darned sight better than them.
not give a damn/shit etc
▪ As David said, the union simply does not give a shit.
▪ For opening doors and not giving a damn about what anybody else has to say to it.
▪ I think their nonchalance about not caring or not giving a damn about record sales is just not true.
▪ It was nature that had turned her grey, she said, and she did not give a damn.
▪ My ideal would be to not give a damn as much as possible.
▪ This time she yelled his name, not giving a damn if she looked a fool, and dived after him.
one (damn/damned) thing after another
▪ Just one damn thing after another.
▪ She was merely coping with one thing after another, not achieving.
▪ Then it was one thing after another, his obese stage, his alcoholic stage.
publish and be damned
▪ But it was entitled to publish and be damned.
the damned
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Damn! I forgot the keys.
II.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
good
▪ As a yacht delivery skipper he had to be a damn good sailor.
▪ I always took teaching seriously and even twenty-five years ago I was damn good at it.
▪ I have to say that I look pretty damn good.
▪ For most people, it's damn good fun.
▪ It seemed a damn good principle at the time.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ He was damn lucky he didn't have an accident.
▪ Homes here are so damn expensive.
▪ I just want to make damn sure we finish on time.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As the mysterious man following Blackeyes, Nigel Planer speaks at last, though he has damn all to say.
▪ But we did try damn it.
▪ But you know damn well that I did.
▪ I always took teaching seriously and even twenty-five years ago I was damn good at it.
▪ I told him he was damn right he should.
▪ She was a great looking woman, so damn relaxed.
▪ The prof had been damn decent about it.
III.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
pretty
▪ But, you know-this writer's pretty damn good too.
▪ Simple: all right, she would make it pretty damn simple.
▪ And then meringues, liqueur whipped cream and crushed raspberries from Andalucia. Pretty damn good, Jay!
▪ There wasn't a great deal else to remember because it had all been pretty damn straight forward.
so
▪ Why was she so damn slow?
▪ But that means you have to fight so damn hard to get even with the system.
▪ It's just that he makes it so damn difficult.
▪ That's why he was so damn good.
▪ Place is so damn big that they can't find them.
▪ Why must life be so damn complicated? he demanded.
▪ It's my fault because my notes were so damn impenetrable!
too
▪ He could not possibly be on steroids: he is too damn skinny.
▪ The Presley girl did not seem too damn happy, I noticed.
▪ Mallachy could be too damn serious for fun.
▪ I think it would be a terrible mistake to make this a pink building-it is too damn big.
▪ I don't have a hard-on. Too damn tired.
▪ Rumour has it Roosevelt's already making secret moves, although he's too damn fly to let anybody in on it.
■ NOUN
business
▪ And it's no damn business of yours!
fool
▪ I began crying and swearing and socking myself on the head for being such a damn fool.
▪ He hated what went on among the other couples and in which he could share were he not such a damn fool.
▪ We got upland politicians to thank for that, damn fools.
▪ She sald Hamlet was a damn fool.
sight
▪ Actually, a damn sight more than from that stiff gherkin Smott.
▪ Perhaps not up there with Wilburforce but a damn sight more daring than anything Diana ever did!
▪ If the place was dry it was going to be a damn sight tougher to manipulate them.
▪ I prefer my women a little older and a damn sight more sober.
thing
▪ Then there's the sheer size of the damn thing.
▪ After you fire, you just break the damn thing against a tree.
▪ Of course the damn thing wouldn't start and that was the last straw.
▪ I want you all to put that damn thing out now and go on home and mind your own business.
▪ He seems convinced of the inherent stability of the hydrogen bomb - after all, he does build the damn things.
▪ Talk about every damn thing under the sun.
▪ I was so uninterested in the damn thing that I didn't bother to keep a copy.
▪ The Internet is just one more damn thing we have to monitor, like television, movies, video games and caffeine.
things
▪ He seems convinced of the inherent stability of the hydrogen bomb - after all, he does build the damn things.
▪ People returned with stories of fierce wrangling between rival A-frame owners; there were too many of the damn things.
▪ Stella, you should sell those damn things.
well
▪ He never damn well is, Donaldson thought, and asked what was to be done about Mrs Balanchine.
▪ I know damn well what you're up to and I don't like it.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ It's a damn shame that you didn't get the job.
▪ It's your own damn fault.
▪ Turn off that damn TV!
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ None of it's recycled, which bothers me, but at least you can read the damn thing now.
▪ Then there's the sheer size of the damn thing.
▪ Thrilled, that is, until I played this damn record and discovered they haven't changed at all.
▪ What if I had to do this every damn day?
▪ You think you're doing them a favour, r ... r ... risking your life for their d ... damn country.
IV.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
near
▪ My dybbuk set out to drive me crazy, and she damned near did.
▪ That was when Turnberry George tried to show his movie, which damn near caused a riot.
▪ Always had, from when he were a lad. Damn near had to get married while he were still apprentice.
▪ Why, Seikaly was damned near fully operational.
▪ He damn near bankrupts me and all but gets me arrested.
pretty
Pretty damn soon too if we're not careful.
▪ We see her now, looking pretty damned great, but with those ferrets none the less on the loose.
▪ Lake's sentiments looked pretty damning in print.
Pretty damned feh, on balance.
so
▪ But he talked so damn much, let slip a lot of details that added up to a fairly complete picture.
▪ Nothing is so damning as watching the effect all this has on Mayra.
▪ And there is so damn much to speculate about.
too
▪ I've worked too damned hard just to let everything be ruined because of unsavoury gossip.
▪ Some one is doing too damn much.
well
▪ They can have anything they damn well want.
▪ Once the election was over they could do almost anything they damn well pleased.
▪ He knew that if Sly Moorcock could not sort out those Abs, he damn well could.
▪ Why didn't Luke damn well help him, instead of threatening to throw him off the film?
▪ A joyous occasion, and she was damned well going to enjoy herself!
▪ I finally said the only thing I damn well wanted was for them to leave so I could get to the hospital.
■ NOUN
consequence
▪ At the outset of our friendship it was always Brian who exploded and damn the consequences.
▪ Spurrier says whatever is on his always-racing mind, even in victory and figures damn the consequences.
hell
▪ Then, damn it to hell, I cried, softly.
▪ Like the damned in hell, I was being tossed from fire to ice.
▪ And, damn his soul to hell, he knew it.
▪ She was damned to hell, of course, she comforted herself.
■ VERB
do
▪ Once the election was over they could do almost anything they damn well pleased.
publish
▪ Either the Government performs a climbdown of epic humiliation scale or it publishes and risks being damned in the division lobbies.
▪ But it was entitled to publish and be damned.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(as) near as damn it
a (damn/darned/darn) sight more/better etc
▪ Actually, a damn sight more than from that stiff gherkin Smott.
▪ I prefer my women a little older and a damn sight more sober.
▪ If he listened to Anthony Scrivener, he would be a darned sight better.
▪ Perhaps not up there with Wilburforce but a damn sight more daring than anything Diana ever did!
▪ The Galapagos finch was a darn sight more valuable than Sandra Willmot.
▪ We were a darned sight better than them.
one (damn/damned) thing after another
▪ Just one damn thing after another.
▪ She was merely coping with one thing after another, not achieving.
▪ Then it was one thing after another, his obese stage, his alcoholic stage.
the damned
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The play was damned by critics after opening night.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ No, damn it, I was right.
▪ Or let him damn himself with his own words?
▪ Smith is not, as Graham Greene might have said, man enough to be damned.
▪ They're looking for us, damn it!
V.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
give
▪ I love my sister's man and I don't give a damn.
▪ Nobody gave a good damn about his needs.
▪ And who gives a damn what it's used for?
▪ Once again, the Government seem not to give a damn what happens to our skills and to the jobs of the future.
▪ But the first summer of 110-degree heat had cured her of giving a damn about any of that.
▪ Daft, because who gives a damn about sweating in the midst of passion?
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(as) near as damn it
a (damn/darned/darn) sight more/better etc
▪ Actually, a damn sight more than from that stiff gherkin Smott.
▪ I prefer my women a little older and a damn sight more sober.
▪ If he listened to Anthony Scrivener, he would be a darned sight better.
▪ Perhaps not up there with Wilburforce but a damn sight more daring than anything Diana ever did!
▪ The Galapagos finch was a darn sight more valuable than Sandra Willmot.
▪ We were a darned sight better than them.
not give a damn/shit etc
▪ As David said, the union simply does not give a shit.
▪ For opening doors and not giving a damn about what anybody else has to say to it.
▪ I think their nonchalance about not caring or not giving a damn about record sales is just not true.
▪ It was nature that had turned her grey, she said, and she did not give a damn.
▪ My ideal would be to not give a damn as much as possible.
▪ This time she yelled his name, not giving a damn if she looked a fool, and dived after him.
one (damn/damned) thing after another
▪ Just one damn thing after another.
▪ She was merely coping with one thing after another, not achieving.
▪ Then it was one thing after another, his obese stage, his alcoholic stage.
publish and be damned
▪ But it was entitled to publish and be damned.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But the first summer of 110-degree heat had cured her of giving a damn about any of that.
▪ But who gives a damn what they think anyway?
▪ Daft, because who gives a damn about sweating in the midst of passion?
▪ Nobody gave a good damn about his needs.
▪ Quite frankly, my dear, at the moment I don't give a damn what your feelings are.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Damn

Damn \Damn\ (d[a^]m), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Damned (d[a^]md or d[a^]m"n[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Damning (d[a^]m"[i^]ng or d[a^]m"n[i^]ng).] [OE. damnen dampnen (with excrescent p), OF. damner, dampner, F. damner, fr. L. damnare, damnatum, to condemn, fr. damnum damage, a fine, penalty. Cf. Condemn, Damage.]

  1. To condemn; to declare guilty; to doom; to adjudge to punishment; to sentence; to censure.

    He shall not live; look, with a spot I damn him.
    --Shak.

  2. (Theol.) To doom to punishment in the future world; to consign to perdition; to curse.

  3. To condemn as bad or displeasing, by open expression, as by denuciation, hissing, hooting, etc.

    You are not so arrant a critic as to damn them [the works of modern poets] . . . without hearing.
    --Pope.

    Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And without sneering teach the rest to sneer.
    --Pope.

    Note: Damn is sometimes used interjectionally, imperatively, and intensively.

Damn

Damn \Damn\, v. i. To invoke damnation; to curse. ``While I inwardly damn.''
--Goldsmith.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
damn

late 13c., "to condemn," from Old French damner "damn, condemn; convict, blame; injure," derivative of Latin damnare "to adjudge guilty; to doom; to condemn, blame, reject," from noun damnum "damage, hurt, harm; loss, injury; a fine, penalty," possibly from an ancient religious term from PIE *dap- "to apportion in exchange" [see Watkins]. The Latin word evolved a legal meaning of "pronounce judgment upon." Theological sense is first recorded early 14c.; the optative expletive use likely is as old.\n

\nDamn and its derivatives generally were avoided in print from 18c. to c.1930s (the famous line in the film version of "Gone with the Wind" was a breakthrough and required much effort by the studio). The noun is recorded from 1610s; to be not worth a damn is from 1817. The adjective is 1775, short for damned; Damn Yankee, characteristic Southern U.S. term for "Northerner," is attested from 1812. Related: Damning.

Wiktionary
damn
  1. (context profane English) (non-gloss definition: Generic intensifier.) fucking; bloody. adv. (context profane English) very, extremely. interj. (context profane English) (non-gloss definition: Used to express anger, irritation, disappointment, annoyance, contempt, etc. ''See also'' '''dammit'''.) n. 1 The use of "damn" as a curse. 2 (context profane English) A small, negligible quantity, being of little value. 3 (context profane English) The smallest amount of concern or consideration. v

  2. 1 (context theology transitive intransitive English) To condemn to hell. 2 To condemn; to declare guilty; to doom; to adjudge to punishment; to sentence; to censure. 3 To put out of favor; to ruin; to label negatively. 4 To condemn as unfit, harmful, of poor quality, unsuccessful, invalid, immoral or illegal. 5 (context profane English) To curse; put a curse upon. 6 (context archaic English) To invoke damnation; to curse.

WordNet
damn
  1. adj. used as expletives; "oh, damn (or goddamn)!" [syn: goddamn]

  2. expletives used informally as intensifiers; "he's a blasted idiot"; "it's a blamed shame"; "a blame cold winter"; "not a blessed dime"; "I'll be damned (or blessed or darned or goddamned) if I'll do any such thing"; "he's a damn (or goddam or goddamned) fool"; "a deuced idiot"; "tired or his everlasting whimpering"; "an infernal nuisance" [syn: blasted, blame, blamed, blessed, damned, darned, deuced, everlasting, goddam, goddamn, goddamned, infernal]

damn
  1. n. something of little value; "his promise is not worth a damn"; "not worth one red cent"; "not worth shucks" [syn: darn, hoot, red cent, shit, shucks, tinker's damn, tinker's dam]

  2. adv. extremely; "you are bloody right"; "Why are you so all-fired aggressive?" [syn: bloody, all-fired]

  3. v. wish harm upon; invoke evil upon; "The bad witch cursed the child" [syn: curse, beshrew, bedamn, anathemize, anathemise, imprecate, maledict] [ant: bless]

Wikipedia
Damn (disambiguation)

Damn usually refers to damnation, a condemnation, usually by a god; frequently used as a profanity.

Damn or Damnation may also refer to:

Damn (band)

Damn! is a funk-rock band based in Lund, Sweden. The four core members are joined on stage and on record by a collective of DJs and live musicians. The group's first album "Natural Sounds" was recorded by the group as a trio and released on Lund Records in Sweden and LoveCat Music in North America. The band members are also videographers and direct their own videos. The band has toured Japan, Europe and North America.

Additionally, Damn! records and tours as the backup band for Swedish rapper Timbuktu.

Damn (Should've Treated U Right)

"Damn (Should've Treated U Right)" is the title of a pop/R&B single by So Plush featuring Ja Rule. The single spent 18 weeks on the US R&B singles chart in 1999.

Usage examples of "damn".

Your buddy yonder might be willin to haul your ass all over Mexico but I damn sure aint.

I said that the tone, the manners I adopted towards her, were those of good society, and proved the great esteem I entertained for her intelligence, but in the middle of all my fine speeches, towards the eleventh or twelfth day of my courtship, she suddenly put me out of all conceit by telling me that, being a priest, I ought to know that every amorous connection was a deadly sin, that God could see every action of His creatures, and that she would neither damn her soul nor place herself under the necessity of saying to her confessor that she had so far forgotten herself as to commit such a sin with a priest.

Van den Bos, tanned still from his damned winter sports, perform the classic aqualung tricks.

Mr Arbutus to answer in kind and reversing the natural order of things to tell Mr Gibling and Mr Gibling to sue and be damned.

And, damn it again, he smirked ever so slightly as if he knew exactly what had gone through my head.

But I think we should eat while the eating is good, and be damned to Asper and the gods.

And hoping like hell the damn monks could keep their vow of goddamned silence and not laugh their asses off.

Sweat and tax and graft the last dollar out of the damned asterites, and take it back to buy a penthouse and a mistress and the gout in Panama City.

Yes, those Bulls of the popes are an irrefragable testimony that auricular confession is the most powerful invention of the devil to corrupt the heart, pollute the body, and damn the soul of the priest and his female penitent!

For a second the other sky came back to me, the one that had been on a level with me, that I awatched change into a round hole with two stars in it, at the end of the pipe where I had hid on the Tokyo docks before the big raid, damn near dying of shit gas, of waiting for the fire to fall.

We landed here for water, as we have just lain becalmed off a damned island full of ghost snakes and walking statues.

Lily Bede spent money like this on every meal and hosted conventions for impecunious suffragists, and collected antique race horses as pets, she must be damn near running the estate into the ground.

She raved against me madly, and begged the mother-superior to send me away, as I had come there to damn her.

The parson, forgetting the sacerdotal office, and his good habit of grinning, swore at Messrs Beit and Mr Ritson, calling them damned thieves, and then began to read the manuscript, and to compare it with the printed book.

Leon had called Moynihan late Sunday night, but the piping voice of the Benet body had not been authoritative enough to get any information out of that damned Irish hoodlum.