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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

cry

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cry/howl/bellow etc of rage
▪ She remembered his cries of rage as he was taken away.
a crying/great/terrible shame
▪ It was a crying shame that they lost the game.
a pressing/crying need (=a very urgent need)
▪ There’s a crying need for more doctors and nurses.
a squeal/gasp/cry etc of delight
▪ The child gave a squeal of delight.
battle cry
▪ ‘Socialism Now!’ was their battle cry.
cry with rage
▪ I was crying with rage and frustration.
cry yourself to sleep (=cry until you fall asleep)
▪ I used to cry myself to sleep every night.
despairing cry/look/sigh etc
▪ She gave me a last despairing look.
had a good cry
▪ She sat down and had a good cry.
have sb laughing/crying etc
▪ Within minutes he had the whole audience laughing and clapping.
hue and cry
laugh till you cry/laugh till the tears run down your face
▪ He leaned back in his chair and laughed till the tears ran down his face.
laugh/groan/cry etc aloud
▪ The pain made him cry aloud.
▪ She could have laughed aloud.
let out a scream/cry/roar etc
▪ He let out a cry of disbelief.
plaintive cry/voice/sound etc
▪ the plaintive cry of the seagull
rallying cry
▪ ‘Land and Liberty’ was the rallying cry of revolutionary Mexico.
scream/cry for mercy
▪ He screamed for mercy, shouting 'don't shoot!'.
shouts/cries of joy
▪ They greeted each other with cries of joy.
war cry
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
again
▪ She was beginning to cry again.
▪ It made her start crying again.
▪ I was worried at first, when Irene started crying again before we had even taken our seats.
▪ I looked out the window at the thickly falling snow and began crying again.
▪ I didn't mean to make you cry again.
▪ Her eyes stung, as if she might cry again.
▪ I cried on Monday night and cried again Tuesday and yesterday.
▪ She began to cry again, and went on crying and crying.
aloud
▪ This was very painful, and made me cry aloud.
▪ We were near the top when a man on the left cried aloud.
▪ The situation cries aloud for strong, even dramatic, and also attention-winning, arguments.
▪ She cried aloud in joyous elation, her body still on fire, holding on to the magical moment as long as she could.
▪ She heard herself cry aloud, as if she had left her body, expelled by the spasm which shook it.
▪ He caught Sally-Anne's wrist in his hand with such strength that she cried aloud.
out
▪ Psychic phenomena seemed to cry out for, and lend themselves to, scientific investigation.
▪ He held his stomach and cried out in pain.
▪ In these early weeks of her dying, Sycorax slept, and in her sleep, cried out.
▪ Willing my heart to beat normally, I defy the urge to turn back or freeze or cry out.
▪ She, too, had needs that cried out to be met, but there was no way of meeting them.
▪ For crying out loud, how many shows about recovering your favorite footstool can a normal person sit through?
▪ Yet here is a dark continent on our own doorstep, crying out for missionary endeavour.
▪ People cried out, called, moaned, and wept.
■ NOUN
baby
▪ Several babies cried, though Jane slept well.
▪ I could beat any newborn baby in the world crying.
▪ At last he let the baby cry.
▪ Watch the baby while it cries.
▪ The baby started in to cry.
▪ Remember how Matt had to learn to hold his babies tight when they cried and had to overcome the boredom he felt?
child
▪ Sometimes children cry in poetry sessions, not to mention Beth and Lucy.
▪ The children are crying their eyes out.
▪ Three children crying in pushchairs were smacked.
▪ The little children were crying constantly, and the older ones were sullen and withdrawn.
▪ As parents we shared our hopes and fears for our children and laughed and cried together.
▪ And if the child started to cry in the meeting, the parents were sent home.
▪ Richter in one of his analects wrote of a child who cried because the sun bad burned up the dew drops.
▪ She was speaking quietly, and there were screams in the background, along with the unmistakable sound of children crying.
girl
▪ The girl who used to cry at criticism was now fireproof.
▪ A little girl may cry for hours and scream angrily whenever her parents try to play with her.
▪ Most of the new girls cried a great deal.
▪ A few girls began to cry.
▪ After this last furlough we paid a last sad visit to the school and found a small girl crying her heart out.
▪ But the girls would cry out: No, no, not true!
▪ The small girl was crying, looking for her lost kittens.
▪ When a girl cried, he held her up so she could blow out a candle.
heart
▪ After this last furlough we paid a last sad visit to the school and found a small girl crying her heart out.
▪ March 7: I cried my heart out last night after seeing the movie High Tide.
▪ My body was crying but my heart was empty.
▪ She cried her heart out, all because of an unruly trouble-making, black-hearted child who was ripping her apart.
▪ Anyway, then she just sprawled on the floor and cried her heart out.
▪ For the first time since I cried my heart out in Puerto Rico - I was crying.
help
▪ Without adequate built-in safeguards, there will be other Susan Allens who will pull the trigger before they cry for help.
▪ The women began to cry when help arrived.
▪ Opening his mouth to cry for help, he -!
▪ The former cried out for help.
▪ The voice she was hearing was surely crying out for help.
▪ It turned out that the radio was keyed continuously, and the only voice was a single trooper crying for help.
▪ If anyone had been crying for help, the firemen must have responded by now.
▪ She cried for help and the pair ran out of the shop.
milk
▪ It is now too late to cry over spilt milk.
▪ It was disappointing, to say the least, but there's no point crying over spilt milk.
▪ No use crying over milk that had been spilt long before Minnie's own time in this house.
▪ Nora Simpson didn't believe in crying over spilt milk.
night
▪ Then he had cried one night following a market day in Hexham, for there he had seen two men fighting.
▪ Elvira cries day and night over her misfortune.
▪ It can't be right to cry through the night.
▪ She would scream if anyone came near her left arm, and she cried at night, begging for painkillers.
▪ Now the parents are crying in the night and no one can soothe us.
▪ These are the women who cry alone at night.
▪ I cry from fear the night before my first exam.
pain
▪ He cried out in pain and stumbled back against the wall.
▪ Weary was crying because of horrible pains in his feet.
▪ Sonny began to cry from pain and fear.
▪ Consequently, it produced more smoke than flames and Ridley cried out in pain.
▪ He held his stomach and cried out in pain.
▪ He increased the pressure on her wrist causing her to cry out in pain and to drop the glass.
▪ The boat seemed to be crying out in pain, like an arthritic suddenly called upon to use weak muscles.
shoulder
▪ She needed a real shoulder to cry on.
▪ To offer another shoulder to cry on.
▪ The researcher could share enthusiasms, be a shoulder to cry on and help brainstorm alternatives.
▪ In past years, Diana knew that Earl Spencer would be a shoulder to cry on and a loving counsellor.
▪ She did not seem to realize what she had done, and laid her head on his shoulder, crying with happiness.
▪ When Sam flopped as she hosted the 1989 Brit pop awards Pat was her shoulder to cry on.
tear
▪ He wanted to cry, but the tears froze on his face.
▪ I cried till the tears all run down in my ears.
▪ I remember crying sentimental tears a few years later in 1987 when I watched on television Neil Kinnock's party political broadcast.
▪ When my sister was upset, she would cry and great piteous tears would roll from her eyes.
▪ Sarah tried to cry and no tears would come.
▪ Yoshimoto, however, is a legitimate storyteller, and avoids the overwrought sentiment that forces a reader to cry unwilling tears.
▪ That night, alone in the room with the coffins, Oliver cried bitter, lonely tears.
voice
▪ Then voices would cry in the falling sigh of wind around its gables.
▪ A voice crying out a message which you could not always understand or believe in, but which was important.
▪ Deep inside, a high, wailing voice stopped crying and fell back into a deep sleep.
▪ Looking down at the top of Joe's balding pate, Michael listened to the haunting childish voice and could have cried.
▪ One of the few voices crying in the wilderness was that of Farringdon member Gordon Wilson.
▪ Hundreds of voices were crying out their wares.
woman
▪ There may be feelings of anger against the person who caused a woman to cry.
▪ The women began to cry when help arrived.
▪ It was rather nice to have a woman crying over him.
▪ It was so realistic a ceremony that several of the women cried.
▪ An explosion of thunder resounded round the silent street and one of the women cried out in fear.
▪ A few black women were crying.
▪ The people were afraid of these wild cats, and the women cried out.
▪ The woman stopped crying, although her shoulders continued to heave, and her cheeks were still wet with tears.
■ VERB
begin
▪ The witness began to cry, and said they had a quilt and other little things.
▪ Sonny began to cry from pain and fear.
▪ Then she was trembling, her shoulders shaking as she began to cry.
▪ He slammed his clenched fist into the desk, and began to cry.
▪ The women began to cry when help arrived.
▪ Then she began to cry whenever she saw him.
▪ An older woman in the rear of the room began to cry.
hear
▪ I think I had not heard him cry for six years.
▪ I heard some one crying and I went in.
▪ Hang about, I hear you cry, doubting Toms that you are.
▪ Walker heard them crying during the emotional scenes and guffawing through happy ones.
▪ In Belgrade cafés, streets and houses, you can hear constant war cries invitations to killing and to hatred.
▪ We heard her crying in the bathroom.
▪ I wake to hear him crying.
▪ Half way up the beach I heard Janir crying.
laugh
▪ The lead factory on the outskirts of town is such a wreck that you don't know whether to laugh or cry.
▪ I wanted to make art that makes them laugh, cry or think.
▪ He didn't know whether to laugh or cry.
▪ He laughed to near crying over unimaginable details.
▪ Some in the team began to laugh until they cried.
▪ He laughed and cried at the same time and threw his arms around the man he had loved.
start
▪ Now he was starting to cry, and I had never seen him cry before.
▪ My mom started crying and everything.
▪ I didn't know what to do so I started to cry.
▪ He started wailing and crying and pulling at the corpses and had to be dragged away.
▪ As he was stirring it he heard Christopher cough and start to cry.
▪ I took one look at her and started to cry.
▪ Proteus started to cry and Kara disentangled him from his makeshift pouch.
▪ He stopped shredding and started crying.
stop
▪ Dean Morris's family say he has hardly stopped crying since the body of his cat Buffy, two, was found.
▪ I stopped crying and started to laugh.
▪ Della stopped crying and she washed her face.
▪ Carol told Petey this once to help him stop crying so she could take a look.
▪ He stopped crying when they arrived at the house.
▪ He said Eurydice stayed in her room most of the time, but now she gave orders and she had stopped crying.
▪ Oh, if only she could stop crying ... Upstairs a door slammed.
▪ But I could not stop crying.
want
▪ She bit her lip, wanting to cry, but too proud.
▪ Beautiful arms; he looked at them and wanted to cry.
▪ My body ached, I was ready to drop, I wanted to cry.
▪ I wanted to cry, weep and beg the Almighty for mercy.
▪ And they were songs that filled you with sadness, that made you want to cry until your throat swelled with salt.
▪ He wanted to cry, but the tears froze on his face.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a shoulder to cry on
▪ If you ever need a shoulder to cry on, just call me.
▪ Remember, I'm always here if you need a shoulder to cry on.
▪ In past years, Diana knew that Earl Spencer would be a shoulder to cry on and a loving counsellor.
▪ The researcher could share enthusiasms, be a shoulder to cry on and help brainstorm alternatives.
be a far cry from sth
▪ Europe was a far cry from what we'd been led to expect.
▪ Alternating child-care responsibility is a far cry from asking a woman to postpone her career to raise her children.
▪ But resistance is a far cry from immunity.
▪ It was a far cry from the modern chalet party.
▪ The 1995 national increase in costs is a far cry from the double-digit growth seen in the late 1980s and early 1990s.
▪ The cinder-block surroundings, while not luxurious, are a far cry from the stripped-down wards of 1958 that greeted early volunteers.
▪ The classical design was a far cry from today's functional agricultural buildings.
▪ The plateau was a far cry from the workaday cottages by the harbour.
▪ The shop is a far cry from the modern boutique, and still has stock dating back for generations.
be in full cry
cry on sb's shoulder
▪ At least she hadn't cried on his shoulder again.
cry/sing etc your heart out
▪ After this last furlough we paid a last sad visit to the school and found a small girl crying her heart out.
▪ Anyway, then she just sprawled on the floor and cried her heart out.
▪ For the first time since I cried my heart out in Puerto Rico - I was crying.
▪ March 7: I cried my heart out last night after seeing the movie High Tide.
▪ She cried her heart out, all because of an unruly trouble-making, black-hearted child who was ripping her apart.
▪ We would march along in step, doing eighty-eight paces to the minute, singing our hearts out.
crying need for sth
▪ There is a crying need for an international insolvency convention.
crying/shopping/talking etc jag
▪ I had an incredible crying jag.
it's a crying shame
▪ It would be a crying shame if high ticket prices kept people away from baseball games.
▪ It's a crying shame to cover up your body.
laugh/cry hard
▪ Suddenly, he came inside crying hard.
strangled cry/gasp/voice etc
▪ After a few thrusting minutes Edward gave a strangled cry that seemed to come from deep in his throat and jerked out of her.
▪ But Gary in his slow strangled voice spoke a kind of poetry as he told me about his previous life.
▪ Gilbert uttered a strangled cry and leapt to his feet with shadow reflections of crawling rain on his spectrally white face.
▪ He thought he made some kind of strangled gasp; he knew his eyes would have expressed his emotions.
▪ Lorrimer gave a strangled cry and lunged out.
▪ Then a sixth man appeared at the door, a small strangled cry came from Miranda.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Come and see what I've found!" Kurt cried.
▪ "I can't move," Lesley cried. "I think I've broken my leg."
▪ "What are we going to do?" she cried.
▪ At night I'd cry myself to sleep, thinking about you.
▪ Don't cry, I didn't mean to upset you.
▪ I could hear the baby crying in the next room.
▪ I sat alone in my room and cried and cried.
▪ Jenny won't tell me what she's crying about.
▪ Kim's eyes were red and she looked as though she'd been crying.
▪ She cried with joy when she heard that the children were safe.
▪ The baby was crying, so I went in to check on him.
▪ The film was so sad, it made me cry.
▪ The poor kid's so miserable, he's upstairs crying his eyes out.
▪ The seagulls on the cliffs were crying loudly.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ During one closing argument that summer, Gwinn broke down and cried.
▪ Emmie had cried until her eyes were hot and her throat dry and aching.
▪ If we cry when we are sad, the physiological response is tears from the eyes and nose.
▪ In these early weeks of her dying, Sycorax slept, and in her sleep, cried out.
▪ Take on the world and never cry craven, he'd said.
▪ The growers who are crying wolf today about the lack of water will post their annual profits in a few months.
▪ When she opened her eyes and saw that she had again missed the tray, she cried.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
great
▪ The first he knows that something is up is when he hears a great cry of anguish from the town.
▪ She uttered a great cry which reached up to the gods.
▪ There was a gasp and a great cry from the watching people.
▪ The whole earth uttered a great cry.
▪ When it arrived, they uttered a great cry of welcome.
▪ The baby suddenly revealed its head and thrust its way out of her, so that she gave a great agonised cry.
▪ He threw up one arm and gave a great cry as the gun went off.
▪ With a great cry the knights followed him.
little
▪ She gives a brief, cut-off little cry like a chirp as she comes, and sinks her teeth into my shoulder.
▪ Finally he made a noise, and Maritza turned around, uttered a little cry of thanks, and took the tissue.
▪ We talked a little till her cries took her into the little theatre.
▪ Call it a little cry of freedom from a much abused soul.
▪ People met and greeted each other with little cries of welcome.
▪ Babies that sleep little and cry frequently often go on to become hyperkinetic.
loud
▪ Very vocal, with a loud laughing cry.
▪ Hers was a loud, piercing cry that sounded as if she was in pain.
▪ The creature gave a loud cry of pain, and we knew we had hit it.
▪ The peasants, having just come out to the fields, turn back, uttering loud cries.
plaintive
▪ Legend has it that the bridge got its name from the plaintive cries of the prisoners as they were escorted across it.
▪ There he left them, knowing that they were safe, despite their plaintive cries.
rallying
▪ This rhetoric offers both a posthoc justification for the changes, and a rallying cry for implementation.
▪ Self-denial and self-help, however, would make a poor rallying cry for the hustings.
▪ Newspapers sometimes appeared to be providing the rallying cry for future demonstration.
▪ Public order is an election rallying cry and fear of crime can influence practice as well as policy.
▪ They both hated orthodoxies and bandwagons, catch-phrases and rallying cries.
sharp
▪ No more laughter, but over the clash of steel a sharp cry.
▪ Suddenly Dad uttered a sharp cry and staggered backwards, slumping against the wall.
▪ Then she could not restrain herself, pounced with a sharp cry on a smear under the handle of the colander.
▪ Madeleine interrupted Thérèse with a sharp cry.
▪ Eventually the dominant male gives a sharp cry and the subordinate flies off.
▪ She fell with a sharp cry of surprise, and the ladder overbalanced on top of her.
small
▪ The odour of must and the small waking cry of a child seep into the air.
▪ He set it before her and they both opened these gifts with a thunderstorm of paper and appropriate small cries of thanks.
▪ She moved around the font into the chapel and at once gave a small cry of triumph.
▪ And when speech gave way to the rhythmic breathing and small cries or even angry groans that I never tired of overhearing?
▪ Then a sixth man appeared at the door, a small strangled cry came from Miranda.
▪ With a small cry of anguish she took one last look at him and turned and fled.
▪ She entered the water with a small cry at its chill.
■ NOUN
battle
▪ His battle cry was echoed by Baal and Set, as they hurtled forward in his wake.
▪ We are springing to the call of our brothers gone before, Shouting the battle cry of Freedom.
▪ She heard his cry, perhaps the battle cry of his northern forefathers when they prepared to attack.
▪ And we bear the glorious stars for the Union and the right, Shouting the battle cry of Freedom!
▪ The new battle cry was: Year-Round Casual.
▪ Their battle cry at the moment is: To know synchronized swimming is to love synchronized swimming.
▪ Her parting gesture, almost a battle cry.
▪ They let off a battle cry.
war
▪ Keep Britain White was the war cry.
▪ When I still refused, they gave their war cry and began dancing about to frighten me.
▪ He was there when the killers streamed down from the surrounding hills, chanting war cries.
▪ In each case the shout is far more than simply a war cry.
■ VERB
give
▪ Beneath her the river snaked silver amongst the rushes and meadowsweet and a buzzard circling on high gave its own mournful cry.
▪ Loi gave a cry and pointed.
▪ But when he uncovered the picture, he gave a cry of pain.
▪ When I still refused, they gave their war cry and began dancing about to frighten me.
▪ He looked up when I came in, gave a kind of cry and ran upstairs and into the study.
▪ It broke over Rex who gave a cry of satisfaction.
▪ She gave a stifled cry of disappointment.
▪ They give point to the cries of the preachers for repentance, conversion, and return to the old religion.
greet
▪ As Mr Clarke was interviewed, his answers were greeted with cries of outrage.
▪ People met and greeted each other with little cries of welcome.
▪ Nothing but silence greeted my cries.
▪ His statement was greeted with cries of mock astonishment and indignation by Tory back-benchers.
▪ The not-guilty verdicts were greeted with cries of delight and tears from some defendants and applause from the gallery.
hear
▪ The first he knows that something is up is when he hears a great cry of anguish from the town.
▪ He felt, too, that he was a baby and could hear himself cry like a child.
▪ At a quarter past twelve he was standing on the landing with Fred when he heard the first cry of the child.
▪ She sees those woods and hears those cries still.
▪ One could hear the cries of outrage from the likes of Mrs Whitehouse and Mrs Thatcher.
▪ You don't have to get stuck into Sky to hear the cry Burn Hollywood Burn.
▪ He heard the cry of its dissolution, saw the blood run away from itself on the floorboards below.
let
▪ Then she lay down, still with her shoes on, and let herself cry.
▪ She let out a cry of rage.
▪ The Beech Naiad let out a last cry of desolation, and fell to the floor.
▪ As Martinez slid backwards on the tin we all let out our own cries of terror.
▪ He must let her cry herself out.
▪ They let off a battle cry.
▪ He knew the sensible thing to do was to remain silent and let her cry away.
raise
▪ He had the right to arrest all poachers found within his bailiwick, and to raise the hue and cry upon them.
▪ They lined up and looked down into the new place and then, weapons waving, raised a battle cry.
rally
▪ If you are truly loyal to Ulster then rally behind the cry for independence.
▪ That was the rallying cry of Nelson Mandela's finely crafted speech.
▪ It has been a radical rallying cry ever since Lenin laid it down as doctrine.
stifle
▪ She loved everything about this man, and when he took her she tried to stifle the cry of pain.
▪ Some one brusquely pulled the headscarf down over her face, stifling her cry, cutting off her vision.
▪ We were well aware of him stifling cries of pain, but there was nothing for it but to proceed.
▪ She bit her lower lip to stifle the cry in her throat and felt the goosepimples bristling across her skin.
utter
▪ The cat crouched uneasily in her arms, then uttered a curious low cry and struggled free.
▪ Finally he made a noise, and Maritza turned around, uttered a little cry of thanks, and took the tissue.
▪ Gilbert uttered a strangled cry and leapt to his feet with shadow reflections of crawling rain on his spectrally white face.
▪ She uttered a great cry which reached up to the gods.
▪ She put her hand to her mouth, uttered a mourning cry and ran through the swing door to her car.
▪ Suddenly Dad uttered a sharp cry and staggered backwards, slumping against the wall.
▪ When it arrived, they uttered a great cry of welcome.
▪ The whole earth uttered a great cry.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a shoulder to cry on
▪ If you ever need a shoulder to cry on, just call me.
▪ Remember, I'm always here if you need a shoulder to cry on.
▪ In past years, Diana knew that Earl Spencer would be a shoulder to cry on and a loving counsellor.
▪ The researcher could share enthusiasms, be a shoulder to cry on and help brainstorm alternatives.
be a far cry from sth
▪ Europe was a far cry from what we'd been led to expect.
▪ Alternating child-care responsibility is a far cry from asking a woman to postpone her career to raise her children.
▪ But resistance is a far cry from immunity.
▪ It was a far cry from the modern chalet party.
▪ The 1995 national increase in costs is a far cry from the double-digit growth seen in the late 1980s and early 1990s.
▪ The cinder-block surroundings, while not luxurious, are a far cry from the stripped-down wards of 1958 that greeted early volunteers.
▪ The classical design was a far cry from today's functional agricultural buildings.
▪ The plateau was a far cry from the workaday cottages by the harbour.
▪ The shop is a far cry from the modern boutique, and still has stock dating back for generations.
be in full cry
burst out laughing/crying/singing etc
▪ At that point I burst out laughing.
▪ Charles didn't respond and after a frozen pause, she collapsed into a chair and burst out crying.
▪ He did it so cleverly that you would think it was the real thing - until he burst out laughing.
▪ I came down the steps of the Ashbery that morning and burst out laughing at the heat.
▪ I said and burst out crying.
▪ Julie, surprised, burst out laughing.
▪ The whole group bursts out laughing.
▪ The woman and children burst out laughing again, getting up from the table and crowding round me.
cry on sb's shoulder
▪ At least she hadn't cried on his shoulder again.
cry/sing etc your heart out
▪ After this last furlough we paid a last sad visit to the school and found a small girl crying her heart out.
▪ Anyway, then she just sprawled on the floor and cried her heart out.
▪ For the first time since I cried my heart out in Puerto Rico - I was crying.
▪ March 7: I cried my heart out last night after seeing the movie High Tide.
▪ She cried her heart out, all because of an unruly trouble-making, black-hearted child who was ripping her apart.
▪ We would march along in step, doing eighty-eight paces to the minute, singing our hearts out.
crying need for sth
▪ There is a crying need for an international insolvency convention.
it's a crying shame
▪ It would be a crying shame if high ticket prices kept people away from baseball games.
▪ It's a crying shame to cover up your body.
laugh/cry hard
▪ Suddenly, he came inside crying hard.
not know whether to laugh or cry
▪ When the whole cake fell off the table, I didn't know whether to laugh or cry.
strangled cry/gasp/voice etc
▪ After a few thrusting minutes Edward gave a strangled cry that seemed to come from deep in his throat and jerked out of her.
▪ But Gary in his slow strangled voice spoke a kind of poetry as he told me about his previous life.
▪ Gilbert uttered a strangled cry and leapt to his feet with shadow reflections of crawling rain on his spectrally white face.
▪ He thought he made some kind of strangled gasp; he knew his eyes would have expressed his emotions.
▪ Lorrimer gave a strangled cry and lunged out.
▪ Then a sixth man appeared at the door, a small strangled cry came from Miranda.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Land and liberty" was the rallying cry of revolutionary Mexico.
▪ As they left the stage there were cries of "More! More!"
▪ We heard a child's cries for help coming from the river.
▪ You'll feel better when you've had a good cry.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A distant cry can be heard issuing from a classroom.
▪ A far cry from the 40,000 they were promising.
▪ All at once I felt the ground moving under my feet, and cries issuing from it.
▪ From below there were the hoarse confused cries of the mob.
▪ It is a far cry from most people's idea of accountants at work.
▪ That seems a far cry from just a few years ago when the only diesels were lorries, buses and the occasional taxi.
Wikipedia

Cry (disambiguation)

Cry usually refers to crying, the act of shedding tears.

Cry may also refer to:

Cry (Faith Hill album)

Cry is the fifth studio album by American country music singer Faith Hill. It was released October 15, 2002 via Warner Bros. Records selling 472,486 copies in its first week, a career best for Hill. The album was intended as a crossover project for her, and although three of its singles were released to country radio, none reached Top Ten. The title track and "One" were both Adult Contemoporary hits, however. It went on to sell 4 million copies worldwide. Hill has publicly stated that, of all the albums she has recorded, Cry is her favorite. Cry also hit #179 on the Billboard Top 200 albums of the decade 2000–2009.

Cry (Mandy Moore song)

"Cry" is a song by American recording artist Mandy Moore, released on November 4, 2001 by Epic Records. It was written and produced by James Renald. Peter Mokran also helped produce the song. The song was released as the third single from her self-titled third album. The song achieved minor success in the United States but was a big hit in Asia, especially in the Philippines.

"Cry" received positive reviews from music critics, was one of the issues most adored by MTV. The lyrics of "Cry" focuses on a girl who thinks that love is insensitive. The musical structure of the song is created based on the melody of a guitar as a ballad. It was used as a soundtrack of the 2002 movie A Walk to Remember, in which she starred alongside Shane West.

Cry (Churchill Kohlman song)

"Cry" is the title of a 1951 popular song written by Churchill Kohlman. The song was first recorded by Ruth Casey on the Cadillac label. The biggest hit version was recorded in New York City by Johnnie Ray and The Four Lads on October 16, 1951.

Cry (Simple Minds album)

Cry is the thirteenth album by Scottish rock band Simple Minds. It was recorded in the last six months of 2001 in Sicily and Scotland (Glasgow). It was officially released on 1 April 2002 but it had already circulated on the Internet weeks before.

Cry (Godley & Creme song)

"Cry" is a song released by the British music duo Godley & Creme on 11 March 1985. It was included on the duo's album The History Mix Volume 1.

The song peaked at No. 16 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, becoming Godley & Creme's lone Top 40 hit in the US apart from their former band, 10cc. It reached No. 19 on the UK Singles Chart.

The duo also directed the song's music video, which featured faces blended into each other using analogue cross-fading.

Cry (Alex Parks song)

"Cry" is the second and final single from Alex Parks' debut album Introduction. It was released in February 2004 and peaked at #13 in the UK Singles Chart.

Cry (Michael Jackson song)

"Cry" is a song recorded by American recording artist Michael Jackson that features on his tenth and final studio album, Invincible (2001). The song was written by R&B singer-songwriter R. Kelly, who had previously written Jackson's 1995 single " You Are Not Alone". "Cry" was produced by Jackson and Kelly. It was released in December 2001 under Epic Records as the second single from Invincible. "Cry" is a R&B ballad, with lyrics that highlight problems with the planet. The lyrics also urge people to unite to make the world a better place. The track, thus, recalls previous Jackson songs that promote peace and environmentalism.

The song was released with two B-side tracks; "Shout" and "Streetwalker". "Cry" received mixed reviews from music critics. The single had a moderate chart performance internationally, with its highest peak being number sixteen in Denmark, and its least successful charting country being Austria. The track was promoted with a music video, which was filmed by Nicholas Brandt. The video does not feature Jackson but shows people holding hands and standing side by side in a variety of settings, including a beach and a forest.

Cry (Faith Hill song)

Cry” was the first single from American Country singer Faith Hill's 2002 Cry album. Before her rendition, the song was recorded by its writer, Angie Aparo, for his 1999 album, The American.

Originally released to country radios, "Cry" crossed over to adult contemporary radios. It spent 11 weeks at #1 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart. The song eventually peaked at number 33 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, in the United States. "Cry" reached number three on the Canadian Singles Chart and was a Top 30 success in the United Kingdom and Australia.

In 2003, at the 45th Annual Grammy Awards, Hill won the Grammy Award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance for "Cry", marking her second win in the category.

This song appears on the video game Karaoke Revolution Volume 2.

Cry (Lynn Anderson album)

Cry is a studio album by country music legend Lynn Anderson, released in 1972.

This album was based on Lynn Anderson's hit from early 1972, "Cry", which hit No. 3 on the Billboard Country charts, and No. 1 on the Cashbox Country charts. In addition the song also reached No. 71 on the Pop charts, and No. 16 on the Adult Contemporary charts that year. This album shows Anderson's new direction into placing her voice into more Pop-oriented songs, including "Cry" (originally a No. 1 Pop hit for Johnnie Ray in 1951). After having a No. 1 Country and Pop hit in late 1970, " (I Never Promised You a) Rose Garden", her record company set her records out more for the Pop market, and never looked back. This helped Lynn Anderson gain the biggest success she ever had for a number of years. Thus, this left Anderson from recording the hard Country material she recorded for her late 1960s albums under Chart Records.

Husband, Glenn Sutton helped produce this album with producing legend, Clive Davis. Most of the songs featured here are Pop songs, like the Addrisi Brothers' "We've Got to Get It on Again" and Sonny & Cher's "When You Say Love". With the help of legendary Country producer, Billy Sherrill, Sutton wrote some of the songs for this album, some of which had been previously hits for Country singers, like Barbara Mandrell's "Tonight My Baby's Coming Home". This album was big-selling album, reaching No. 2 on the "Top Country Albums" chart and No. 114 on the "Billboard 200" albums chart.

Cry (Kym Marsh song)

"Cry" is a song written by Espen Lind and Amund Bjørklund for former Hear'say member Kym Marsh's debut album Standing Tall. It was released as her debut solo single on 6 April 2003 in the United Kingdom. It charted at a peak position of number two in the UK Singles Chart in its second week of release.

Cry (Ronnie Dove album)

Cry is Ronnie Dove's fifth studio album (and sixth album release) for Diamond Records.

It was released in 1967 as D-5007 in mono and SD-5007 in stereo.

The album peaked at number 121 on the Billboard 200 chart.

Cry (Alastair Galbraith album)

Cry is an album by New Zealand musician Alastair Galbraith released in 2000.

Cry (LL Cool J song)

"Cry" is a single by LL Cool J from his twelfth studio album, Exit 13 (2008). The song features guest vocals by R&B singer Lil' Mo and production by Andreas "Raw Uncut" Dombrowski. The song is noted for its sampling of Bunny Sigler's "Half a Man," and Ja Rule's " I Cry," which also happens to feature Lil' Mo. It was digitally released as an individual buzz single in June 17, 2008, and saw a limited international release as a B-side to the accompanying 12" single, "5 Boroughs," in June 24, 2008; alongside a US release in July 8, 2008.

Cry (Waterfront song)

"Cry" is a single by British duo Waterfront, first released in 1988. The song was a hit in both the UK and US. It reached the Top 20 on the UK Singles Chart, peaking at #17 in May 1989, and the Top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100, at #10. The song appears on their 1989 self-titled debut album.

Cry (Sigma song)

"Cry" is a song performed by British drum and bass duo Sigma featuring vocals from British pop group Take That. The song was released as a digital download on 20 May 2016 through 3 Beat Records as the second single from their second studio album. The song peaked to number 21 on the UK Singles Chart.

Cry (Stellar song)

"Cry" is a song recorded by South Korean girl group Stellar as their seventh single album and ninth single overall. The song was released on July 18, 2016 by The Entertainment Pascal and distributed by Universal Music. In order to promote the song, Stellar appeared in several South Korean music programs, including Music Bank, Show! Music Core and Inkigayo. A music video for the song was released in conjunction with the single.

Cry (Kelly Clarkson song)

"Cry" is a song by American singer and songwriter Kelly Clarkson, taken from her fourth studio album, All I Ever Wanted (2009). It was written by Clarkson, Jason Halbert and Mark Townsend, with production being done by Howard Benson. It was released as the album's fourth single (fifth and final overall) only in Australia and Germany; it was released as a digital download on March 12, 2010 in Germany and added to Australian radio stations on March 15, 2010.

"Cry" is a pop rock ballad, with Clarkson adding that it is a " waltz" ballad with influences of country music. Inspired by a friendship that went sour, lyrically, "Cry" talks about betrayal. The song received mostly positive reviews from music critics, who agreed the song matched Clarkson's ability of dominate a ballad, while also praising her vocals on the track. The song was covered by Lea Michele on an season three episode of Glee, and her version charted on the lower regions of Canada, Ireland and the United Kingdom.

Cry (Just a Little)

"Cry (Just a Little)" is a song by Dutch dance duo Bingo Players. The song's only lyrics are the repetition of "I know I'm caught up in the middle; I cry just a little when I think of letting go. Oh no, gave up on the riddle; I cry just a little when I think of letting go." They were originally in " Piano in the Dark", a 1988 hit song by Brenda Russell. For this song, the line was performed by Kelli-Leigh (vocals) along with Hal Ritson (back vocals).

"Cry (Just a Little)" was released in Belgium as a digital download on 18 May 2011 and was released in the United Kingdom on 18 September 2011. The song has charted in Belgium and the Netherlands.

This song later was re-sampled for the chorus of Flo Rida's 2012 release; " I Cry".

Cry (The Mavis's song)

"Cry" is a song by Australian alternative rock group, The Mavis's. The song was released in January 1998 as the first single from their second studio album, Pink Pills (1998). The single peaked at number 13, becoming the group's highest charting single.

At the ARIA Music Awards of 1998, "Cry" was nominated for two awards— ARIA Award for Single of the Year, losing to " Torn" by Natalie Imbruglia; and ARIA Award for Song of the Year, but lost to " No Aphrodisiac" by The Whitlams.

The song polled at number 61 in the Triple J Hottest 100, 1998 countdown.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Cry

Cry \Cry\ (kr[imac]), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Cried (kr[imac]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Crying.] [F. crier, cf. L. quiritare to raise a plaintive cry, scream, shriek, perh. fr. queri to complain; cf. Skr. cvas to pant, hiss, sigh. Cf. Quarrel a brawl, Querulous.]

  1. To make a loud call or cry; to call or exclaim vehemently or earnestly; to shout; to vociferate; to proclaim; to pray; to implore.

    And about the ninth hour, Jesus cried with a loud voice. -- Matt. xxvii. 46.

    Clapping their hands, and crying with loud voice.
    --Shak.

    Hear the voice of my supplications when I cry unto thee. -- Ps. xxviii.

  2. The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord.
    --Is. xl.

  3. Some cried after him to return.
    --Bunyan.

    2. To utter lamentations; to lament audibly; to express pain, grief, or distress, by weeping and sobbing; to shed tears; to bawl, as a child.

    Ye shall cry for sorrow of heart.
    --Is. lxv. 1

  4. I could find it in my heart to disgrace my man's apparel and to cry like a woman. --Shak. 3. To utter inarticulate sounds, as animals. The young ravens which cry. --Ps. cxlvii. 9. In a cowslip's bell I lie There I couch when owls do cry. --Shak. To cry on or To cry upon, to call upon the name of; to beseech. ``No longer on Saint Denis will we cry.'' --Shak. To cry out.

    1. To exclaim; to vociferate; to scream; to clamor.

    2. To complain loudly; to lament.

      To cry out against, to complain loudly of; to censure; to blame.

      To cry out on or To cry out upon, to denounce; to censure. ``Cries out upon abuses.''
      --Shak.

      To cry to, to call on in prayer; to implore.

      To cry you mercy, to beg your pardon. ``I cry you mercy, madam; was it you?''
      --Shak.

Cry

Cry \Cry\ (kr?), n.; pl. Cries (kr?z). [F. cri, fr. crier to cry. See Cry, v. i. ]

  1. A loud utterance; especially, the inarticulate sound produced by one of the lower animals; as, the cry of hounds; the cry of wolves.
    --Milton.

  2. Outcry; clamor; tumult; popular demand.

    Again that cry was found to have been as unreasonable as ever.
    --Macaulay.

  3. Any expression of grief, distress, etc., accompanied with tears or sobs; a loud sound, uttered in lamentation.

    There shall be a great cry throughout all the land.
    --Ex. xi. 6.

    An infant crying in the night, An infant crying for the light; And with no language but a cry.
    --Tennyson.

  4. Loud expression of triumph or wonder or of popular acclamation or favor.
    --Swift.

    The cry went once on thee.
    --Shak.

  5. Importunate supplication.

    O, the most piteous cry of the poor souls.
    --Shak.

  6. Public advertisement by outcry; proclamation, as by hawkers of their wares.

    The street cries of London.
    --Mayhew.

  7. Common report; fame.

    The cry goes that you shall marry her.
    --Shak.

  8. A word or phrase caught up by a party or faction and repeated for effect; as, the party cry of the Tories.

    All now depends upon a good cry.
    --Beaconsfield.

  9. A pack of hounds.
    --Milton.

    A cry more tunable Was never hollaed to, nor cheered with horn.
    --Shak.

  10. A pack or company of persons; -- in contempt.

    Would not this . . . get me a fellowship in a cry of players?
    --Shak.

  11. The crackling noise made by block tin when it is bent back and forth.

    A far cry, a long distance; -- in allusion to the sending of criers or messengers through the territory of a Scottish clan with an announcement or summons.

Cry

Cry \Cry\, v. t.

  1. To utter loudly; to call out; to shout; to sound abroad; to declare publicly.

    All, all, cry shame against ye, yet I 'll speak.
    --Shak.

    The man . . . ran on,crying, Life! life! Eternal life!
    --Bunyan.

  2. To cause to do something, or bring to some state, by crying or weeping; as, to cry one's self to sleep.

  3. To make oral and public proclamation of; to declare publicly; to notify or advertise by outcry, especially things lost or found, goods to be sold, ets.; as, to cry goods, etc.

    Love is lost, and thus she cries him.
    --Crashaw.

  4. Hence, to publish the banns of, as for marriage.

    I should not be surprised if they were cried in church next Sabbath.
    --Judd.

    To cry aim. See under Aim.

    To cry down, to decry; to depreciate; to dispraise; to condemn.

    Men of dissolute lives cry down religion, because they would not be under the restraints of it.
    --Tillotson.

    To cry out, to proclaim; to shout. ``Your gesture cries it out.''
    --Shak.

    To cry quits, to propose, or declare, the abandonment of a contest.

    To cry up, to enhance the value or reputation of by public and noisy praise; to extol; to laud publicly or urgently.

Wiktionary

cry

n. 1 A shedding of tears; the act of crying. 2 A shout or scream. 3 Words shouted or screamed. 4 (context collectively English) A group of hounds. 5 (context obsolete derogatory English) A pack or company of people. 6 (context ambitransitive of an animal English) A typical sound made by the species in question. 7 A desperate or urgent request. 8 (context obsolete English) Common report; gossip. vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To shed a tear; to weep. 2 (context transitive English) To utter loudly; to call out; to declare publicly. 3 (context ambitransitive English) To shout, scream, yell. 4 (context intransitive English) To utter inarticulate sounds, as animals do. 5 (context transitive English) To cause to do something, or bring to some state, by crying or weeping. 6 To make oral and public proclamation of; to notify or advertise by outcry, especially things lost or found, goods to be sold, etc. 7 Hence, to publish the banns of, as for marriage.

WordNet

cry

  1. n. a loud utterance; often in protest or opposition; "the speaker was interrupted by loud cries from the rear of the audience" [syn: outcry, call, yell, shout, vociferation]

  2. a loud utterance of emotion (especially when inarticulate); "a cry of rage"; "a yell of pain" [syn: yell]

  3. a slogan used to rally support for a cause; "a cry to arms"; "our watchword will be `democracy'" [syn: war cry, rallying cry, battle cry, watchword]

  4. a fit of weeping; "had a good cry"

  5. the characteristic utterance of an animal; "animal cries filled the night"

  6. [also: cried, cryings (pl), crying (pl)]

cry

  1. v. utter a sudden loud cry; "she cried with pain when the doctor inserted the needle"; "I yelled to her from the window but she couldn't hear me" [syn: shout, shout out, call, yell, scream, holler, hollo, squall]

  2. shed tears because of sadness, rage, or pain; "She cried bitterly when she heard the news of his death"; "The girl in the wheelchair wept with frustration when she could not get up the stairs" [syn: weep] [ant: laugh]

  3. utter aloud; often with surprise, horror, or joy; "`I won!' he exclaimed"; "`Help!' she cried"; "`I'm here,' the mother shouted when she saw her child looking lost" [syn: exclaim, cry out, outcry, call out, shout]

  4. proclaim or announce in public; "before we had newspapers, a town cryer would cry the news"; "He cried his merchandise in the market square" [syn: blazon out]

  5. demand immediate action; "This situation is crying for attention"

  6. utter a characteristic sound; "The cat was crying"

  7. bring into a particular state by crying; "The little boy cried himself to sleep"

  8. [also: cried, cryings (pl), crying (pl)]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

cry

late 13c., from cry (v.).\n

cry

early 13c., "beg, implore," from Old French crier, from Vulgar Latin *critare, from Latin quiritare "to wail, shriek" (source of Italian gridare, Old Spanish cridar, Spanish and Portuguese gritar), which is of uncertain origin; perhaps a variant of quirritare "to squeal like a pig," from *quis, echoic of squealing, despite ancient folk etymology that traces it to "call for the help of the Quirites," the Roman constabulary. The meaning was extended 13c. to weep, which it largely replaced by 16c. Related: Cried; crying.\n

\nMost languages, in common with English, use the general word for "cry out, shout, wail" to also mean "weep, shed tears to express pain or grief." Romance and Slavic, however, use words for this whose ultimate meaning is "beat (the breast)," compare French pleurer, Spanish llorar, both from Latin plorare "cry aloud," but probably originally plodere "beat, clap the hands." Also Italian piangere (cognate with French plaindre "lament, pity") from Latin plangere, originally "beat," but especially of the breast, as a sign of grief. U.S. colloquial for crying out loud is 1924, probably another euphemism for for Christ's sake.

Usage examples of "cry".

The Wests clearly made sure Carol Ann Cooper could neither move nor cry out when they abused her.

But there can be no doubt that the Wests made sure she could neither move nor cry out when they abused her.

Out of politeness the countess looked at her husband before accepting the invitation, but he cried out, without ceremony, that he was ready to go if I took the whole family.

It was something Granny Aching had said once, when Tiffany had been crying about a lamb.

I could hear their voices, full of excitement -- but the acoustics of the place made it impossible to get a good fix on the cries that were bounding back and forth across the lobby.

The Adelantado, hearing the cries, left Castaneda in his place to collect the people who had not come up, who were at least half the force, and went himself to see if they were in any danger.

I but said thy loved one should be adjudged insane, yet had ye not cried out I should have said that the condition is not one depending upon any definite change in the structure of his mind, upon no weakness of his brain.

Certainly, if a female manager or leader is seen crying and emotionally disabled in a situation that might be handled aggressively by a strong male, she will lose prestige in the eyes of many people.

But it is a little silly for an agitator to cry thief when the success of his agitation has led to the adoption of his ideas.

City advocates could cry bloody murder if you took one position, while the agribusiness lobby would come after you if you took the other.

Messua cried, and Buldeo embroidered the story of his adventures in the jungle, till he ended by saying that Akela stood up on his hind legs and talked like a man.

Paris divided in opinion, and to hear the alarming cries raised by the confederates of the Faubourgs when the King was already at St.

I acceded rather reluctantly to the proposition, though at that time I was incapable of ascertaining his intention, which was, after conducting me to a remote part of the structure, to deliver me into the hands of three ruffians, who, having covered me with a veil so thick as to exclude every object from my view, placed me upon a mule, and conveyed me, regardless of my cries, through the deepest recesses of the woods, when, having arrived at a small inn, situated at the extremity of the forest, we stopped without alighting for refreslnnent.

That we moved your big soft body with allegedly not enough notice and that east-side school you cried over and that Negro research resource librarian there with the hair out to here that.

Besides the rustling of the gas cells there was the creaking of the aluminium framework along which he walked and the musical cries of thousands of steel bracing wires.