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The Collaborative International Dictionary

clough

Paddle \Pad"dle\, n. [See Paddle, v. i.]

  1. An implement with a broad blade, which is used without a fixed fulcrum in propelling and steering canoes and boats.

  2. The broad part of a paddle, with which the stroke is made; hence, any short, broad blade, resembling that of a paddle, such as that used in table tennis.

    Thou shalt have a paddle upon thy weapon.
    --Deut. xxiii. 1

  3. 3. One of the broad boards, or floats, at the circumference of a water wheel, or paddle wheel.

  4. A small gate in sluices or lock gates to admit or let off water; -- also called clough.

  5. (Zo["o]l.) A paddle-shaped foot, as of the sea turtle.

  6. A paddle-shaped implement for stirring or mixing.

  7. [In this sense prob. for older spaddle, a dim. of spade.] See Paddle staff (b), below. [Prov. Eng.] Paddle beam (Shipbuilding), one of two large timbers supporting the spring beam and paddle box of a steam vessel. Paddle board. See Paddle, n., 3. Paddle shaft, the revolving shaft which carries the paddle wheel of a steam vessel. Paddle staff.

    1. A staff tipped with a broad blade, used by mole catchers. [Prov. Eng.]

    2. A long-handled spade used to clean a plowshare; -- called also plow staff. [Prov. Eng.]

      Paddle steamer, a steam vessel propelled by paddle wheels, in distinction from a screw propeller.

      Paddle wheel, the propelling wheel of a steam vessel, having paddles (or floats) on its circumference, and revolving in a vertical plane parallel to the vessel's length.

clough

Cloff \Cloff\ (kl[o^]f; 115), n. [Etymol. uncertain.] Formerly an allowance of two pounds in every three hundred weight after the tare and tret are subtracted; now used only in a general sense, of small deductions from the original weight. [Written also clough.]
--McCulloch.

Wiktionary

clough

Etymology 1 alt. 1 (context Northern England US English) A narrow valley; a cleft in a hillside; a ravine, glen, or gorge. 2 A sluice used in returning water to a channel after depositing its sediment on the flooded land. 3 A cliff; a rocky precipice. 4 (label en dialectal) The cleft or fork of a tree; crotch. 5 (label en dialectal) A wood; weald. n. 1 (context Northern England US English) A narrow valley; a cleft in a hillside; a ravine, glen, or gorge. 2 A sluice used in returning water to a channel after depositing its sediment on the flooded land. 3 A cliff; a rocky precipice. 4 (label en dialectal) The cleft or fork of a tree; crotch. 5 (label en dialectal) A wood; weald. Etymology 2

alt. Formerly an allowance of two pounds in every three hundredweight after the tare and tret are subtracted; now used only in a general sense, of small deductions from the original weight. n. Formerly an allowance of two pounds in every three hundredweight after the tare and tret are subtracted; now used only in a general sense, of small deductions from the original weight.

Wikipedia

Clough

Clough ( ; ) is a village and townland in County Down, Northern Ireland. It sits about 3 miles from Dundrum on the A2 between Newcastle and Belfast. The A2 continues via Downpatrick and the coast via Strangford and the ferry to Portaferry to Belfast, whilst most road traffic heads along from Clough along the A24 via Carryduff to Belfast. It had a population of 255 people in the 2001 Census. Clough is situated within the Down District Council area.

Clough (disambiguation)

Clough can refer to the following:

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

clough

"ravine with a river," Old English cloh (in place names), of uncertain origin.

Usage examples of "clough".

Renault and that Harris Clough had been driving a petrol blue Renault.

Kramer came in when his buzzer sounded, made coffee for the two generals and was aware that Grote and Clough were old pals and that the Ripsaw general was kidding the pants off his guest.

As if they had heard themselves mentioned, Lydia Clough, twenty-five years old and seemingly content to live the rest of her life with her parents, came into the room with Kenward, her older brother.

She looked at Calum in time to see Lydia Clough place her hand on his arm and speak to him.

Medical Examiner Clough welcomed the eminent Professor Van Dusen's proffer of assistance in his capacity of M.

Fields, diplomatic as long as nobody was hurt, had laughed when Arthur Hugh Clough had relayed Child's comment in the Authors' Room at the Corner, but it had irked Longfellow quite a bit to hear of the exchange.

Clough I met Brenda Clough in Washington at a signing, and it was a very long signing, and she had waited with an astonishingly patient infant son for hours to get her books signed.

There could be no doubt that the other members of the jolly boat's crew were on the yard, and that Clough had led the way to the starboard yardarm.

Clough appeared brash and vulgar, always the first to buy a round of drinks, always the loudest with the dirty jokes.