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Chic (disambiguation)

Chic means fashionably "stylish" or "smart".

Chic may also refer to:

Chic

Chic , meaning "stylish" or "smart", is an element of fashion.

Chic (magazine)

Chic was a pornographic magazine started by Larry Flynt, of Hustler fame in 1976. The first issue was published in November 1976.

In 1979, Flynt went on trial for obscenity charges over eight issues of Hustler and three issues of Chic magazine. In 1984, a Texas woman, Jeannie Braun, successfully sued Chic for publishing a photo of "Ralph the Diving Pig" and her in the magazine. She had contended that the editor had misrepresented Chic as a fashion magazine.

Chic (band)

Chic ( ; currently Chic featuring Nile Rodgers) is an American band that was organized during 1976 by guitarist Nile Rodgers and bassist Bernard Edwards. Its commercially successful disco songs include " Dance, Dance, Dance (Yowsah, Yowsah, Yowsah)" (1977), " Everybody Dance" (1977), " Le Freak" (1978), " I Want Your Love" (1978), " Good Times" (1979), and " My Forbidden Lover" (1979). The group regarded themselves as a rock band for the disco movement "that made good on hippie peace, love and freedom". In October 2014, Chic was nominated for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame for the tenth time.

Chic (album)

Chic is the self-titled debut album by the American R&B band, Chic, released on Atlantic Records in 1977. The cover art featured two models - Valentine Monnier (left) and Alva Chinn (right) - uncredited, in a photograph taken by Frank Laffitte.

Chic (horse)

Chic (foaled February 27, 2000) is a chestnut Thoroughbred racehorse. A filly, she is owned and bred by Cheveley Park Stud and was trained by Sir Michael Stoute. Out of the mare Exclusive, winner of the 1998 Group One Coronation Stakes, Chic was sired by Machiavellian, a French champion at age two who was a son of the very influential American sire Mr. Prospector. She is a half-sister to Echelon, the 2007 Matron Stakes winner, and is closely related to Entrepreneur, the 1997 2,000 Guineas winner.

Chic (automobile)

Chic was an automobile manufactured in the Adelaide suburb of Millswood in the early 1920s. The name was a word-play on the name of the designer, Clarence Chick. Production numbers were small and only a few cars are known to have survived, including two at the Australian National Motor Museum at Birdwood in the Adelaide Hills.

Clarence (Clarrie to friends and family) was the son of a Foundry owner in Clarence Park, dealing with Horse & cart needs. Against the interest of the family business Clarrie started developing automobiles, his first being converted cart using wheels & suspension from bicycles with a large spring (like a large alarm clock) that had a top speed of 8Mph with distance of 2 miles.

Clarrie was a Gunner in Field artillery in WW1 (Gallipoli day 3 & France landing in Day 7) and as a Captain, developed a Field recovery unit in the Pacific during WWII.

Clarence used Meadows Industrial engine from England. Chassis and rails were also preformed in England. The Meadows was a real lugging engine that hung on under great load. The Meadows engine was designed as an industrial engine to power small cranes, industrial power packs & electric generators. Due to this Clarrie used very simple gear construction to achieve reduction in ratios.

Clarrie had great success with the rural community of Victoria due to the cars performance on the rough, wet Victorian tracks of the day.

Clarrie appointed the SA governor Richard Butler as president around 1924. Richard died at sea on route to England to raise capital. This event caused a panic with the other investors who rushed into the factory and took anything of value, including 27 cars (in different stages of construction). This had a major flow on effect as construction of the chassis/Body was to start at Oldings Body manufacturers (we believe to be now Holden factory in SA) works in South Australia.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

chic

adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
very
▪ Oh yes, we could be very chic when the occasion demanded.
▪ Who's going to start me off on this one? Very chic brush-and-comb set.
▪ He had visualised some one diamond-hard, very chic, very ambitious.
▪ I burst through the outer door, red-faced and sweating. Very chic.
▪ Shops with Style On Capri and Ischia dazzling boutiques sell marvellous leather shoes and very chic clothes.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a chic apartment
▪ a chic restaurant in Boston
▪ She is chic and witty.
▪ The east side of the city has become very chic in the past few years.
▪ They live in a chic apartment overlooking the Seine.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A dinner party at a chic New York restaurant cost the museum $ 5, 500.
▪ At his side in public Jackie's air of sophistication and chic cultural warmth complemented it perfectly.
▪ He thought she was perfect, the height of chic.
▪ Nor, for that matter, can family life be a question of chic.
▪ So you can be chic as you get slim!
▪ The design team creates beaded extravaganzas that are truly chic.
▪ We are in Madame Jo Jo's - a chic transvestite bar in Soho.
Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

chic

1856, as a noun, "style, artistic skill," from French chic, 19c. in "stylishness" sense, originally "subtlety" (16c.), which is of unknown origin, perhaps [Klein] related to German Schick "tact, skill," from Middle Low German schikken "arrange appropriately," or Middle High German schicken "to arrange, set in order;" or from French chicane, from chicanerie (see chicanery). The adjectival meaning "stylish" is from 1879 in English, "Not so used in F[rench]." [OED].

WordNet

chic

adj. elegant and stylish; "chic elegance"; "a smart new dress"; "a suit of voguish cut" [syn: smart, voguish]

chic

n. elegance by virtue of being fashionable [syn: chicness, modishness, smartness, stylishness, swank, last word]

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Chic

Chic \Chic\, a. [F. Cf. Chic, n.] Original and in good taste or form; stylish; in current fashion, fashionable. [Colloq.] [Webster 1913 Suppl. +PJC] ||

Wiktionary

chic

a. stylish; elegant n. Good form; style.

Usage examples of "chic".

Police SWAT teams in chic basic black accessorized with tear gas and semiautomatic weapons are charging in past the doorman holding the door in his gold braid.

A classic spree of youthful dynamism after his last rejuvenation had made him choose a visible pattern, stylish and chic in those days.

In Europe, Tom gathered, inadequate heating was a hallmark of chic in winter, like the iceless martini in summer.

He was the type of man to go for an exotic butterfly like Monique Von Rutter or a ruthlessly chic Englishwoman like Madame Lambert.

Came knocking at my door in all your foul, cool, chic of designer jeans and leather blouson and your pocket stuffed with G.

She was wearing unisex black cotton pants and a black blouse buttoned over the neck, black boots, belt, coat -- homeless chic -- and she looked good.

He sure knew better than to say that, because his second mistake had been to innocently agree that Veronique was chic--whatever the hell chic meant.

All of a sudden Vive found herself taking rifter chic very seriously indeed.

Police SWAT teams in chic basic black accessorized with tear gas and semiautomatic weapons are charging in past the doorman holding the door in his gold braid.

Like the black teenage burglars who are terrorizing chic Georgetown these days, Nixon conquered so easily that he soon lost any fear of being caught.

Two days later there was another visitor Christabel, a cool, chic vision in white, laden with grapes and hot-house flowers and a pile of magazines.

In these moods he sometimes designed elevations of buildings, very striking, very original, very chic, very everything but habitable.

Remember the Twenty-six Commissars of Baku, I thought grimly, as my virtual leather jacket and trousers -- Bolshevik chic -- creaked around me.

They walked down to Old Compton Street, on the edge of Soho, where the tawdry and the chic sit side by side to the benefit of both, and they ate at La Reache, filling up on couscous and dozens of marvelous plates of exotic food, which covered their table and spilled over onto an unused table nearby, and they walked from there to a small pub Sylvia liked in nearby Berwick Street, and they had a few drinks, and they chatted.

Now it was a tangle of riotous growth, a jungle where plants and autotrophs from myriad worlds had broken out of their assigned places, curling round the disap pearing latticework, intermingling in a bedlam of anar chic biogenesis.