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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

chemical

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a chemical compound (=formed by a chemical process involving two or more elements)
a chemical weapons ban
▪ a global chemical weapons ban
chemical engineering
chemical pollution
▪ Chemical pollution threatens the survival of these animals.
chemical properties
▪ They grouped the known elements by chemical properties.
chemical reaction
▪ the chemical reaction between ozone and chlorine
chemical warfare (=using chemicals, for example poisonous gases, as weapons)
▪ the consequences of America’s chemical warfare in Vietnam
chemical warfare
chemical weapon
chemical/biological weapons (=weapons that use chemicals such as poisonous gases, or dangerous germs)
▪ Troops may have been exposed to chemical weapons.
chemical/industrial etc pollutants
▪ industrial pollutants in the lake
industrial/chemical waste
▪ pollution caused by industrial waste
nuclear/chemical etc warhead
toxic chemicals/substances/fumes/gases
▪ Toxic chemicals were spilled into the river.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
agricultural
▪ This has been mostly in agricultural chemicals where tonnages have proved a good fit with Hickson's type of batch equipment.
▪ The agricultural chemicals and the fuel are no longer available.
▪ But hares were declining before paraquat was introduced, and the effects of agricultural chemicals on wildlife are notoriously difficult to assess.
▪ Extensive use of agricultural chemicals has driven out many animal and plant species.
▪ Glyphosate, often sold under the brand name Roundup, is one of the world's most widely used agricultural chemicals.
dangerous
▪ They say that because the chalk's porous, dangerous chemicals could seep into groundwater below.
▪ In addition, it seems no public warnings were issued about the addition of this potentially dangerous chemical.
▪ Time allowed 00:18 Read in studio A drum of dangerous chemicals has been stolen from a factory store.
▪ No scientist is careless enough to handle dangerous chemicals or substances without suitable protection.
▪ A mere 66 hold dangerous chemicals.
▪ He said he had earned an international reputation, particularly in his work on the transportation of dangerous chemicals.
▪ Mr Howes said he and Mr Dimmer were never issued with protective clothing or warned how dangerous the chemical was.
fine
▪ Where fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals with high added value can be produced by biotechnology there will be rapid developments.
▪ Pulp, paper, viscose and fine chemical industries generate huge volumes of sodium sulphate byproduct.
▪ Our particular strength is that we have progressively focused into areas of specialisation including pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals.
▪ Howards began by manufacturing fine chemicals, especially the antimalarial drug quinine and its derivatives, for the pharmaceutical industry.
▪ To describe oneself as a fine chemicals supplier, therefore, requires self-confidence, not to say courage.
▪ Since 1970, Janssen Chimica has been manufacturing fine chemicals.
▪ Here, Nicholson extended the range of pharmaceuticals and added fine chemicals for use in the burgeoning dyeing and photographic industries.
hazardous
▪ However, many potentially hazardous chemical installations are not covered by such regulations.
▪ Stolen chemicals: A car containing hazardous chemicals was stolen in South Hylton, Sunderland.
Hazardous chemicals: New powers over the storage and disposal of hazardous chemicals will be introduced.
▪ Existing powers over importation, use and supply of hazardous chemicals will be extended.
▪ Safer handling, storage and transport of hazardous chemicals will be held in Aberdeen on 28 February 1992.
▪ Over the years indiscriminate dumping has resulted in a large number of environmentally dangerous sites that are leaking toxic and hazardous chemicals.
industrial
▪ Often, as in household products or industrial chemicals, hot competition among affiliates of big multinationals ensures both growth and cost-competitiveness.
▪ They will be used to bring in the rock crushing plant, the industrial chemicals and the explosives.
▪ Between 1933 and 1938 the journal Nature published some short reports on the biological effects of several industrial chemicals.
▪ The University of Kong Hong won a cup and gold medals with a discussion a disposing of the industrial chemical wastes.
▪ These show the flow of materials during an industrial chemical process.
▪ More than 50 years later the evidence from the 30s that industrial chemicals had oestrogenic activity resurfaced.
organic
▪ However, there is little sign that it will ever produce compounds on the scale required by the heavy organic chemicals industry.
▪ One of the original bugs had undergone a mutation that caused it to excrete acetate, an organic chemical.
▪ In fact there was remarkably little evidence for standard organic chemicals that do not need to be formed biologically.
▪ It shows the close association that can exist between organic chemical synthesis and clay surfaces.
▪ It used to be the basis of the whole heavy organic chemical industry, and might be again.
▪ The theory is that industrial alcohol can desensitize some one to all synthetic organic chemicals, because it is derived from oil.
▪ However, human urine would contain hormones that are similar to organic chemicals that sharks use to locate their prey.
synthetic
▪ More than 75,000 synthetic chemicals are now on the market, with a thousand new ones coming on board every year.
▪ Many of the compounds in question are members of a group of estrogen-like synthetic chemicals that are widespread in the environment.
▪ The arrival of synthetic chemicals revolutionized postwar agriculture.
▪ Why are some people apparently made ill by everyday synthetic chemicals?
▪ Any synthetic chemical will carry with it a small percentage of undesirable substances which are not found in the essential oil.
▪ But above all, a synthetic chemical lacks the life-force found only in nature.
▪ When tested by a doctor with various synthetic chemicals, Sheila's symptoms reappeared.
▪ In the case of synthetic chemicals apparently causing asthma, the effect may be due to irritation rather than an allergic reaction.
toxic
▪ Beyond the barrier lay some of the most toxic chemicals known, awaiting destruction by fire.
▪ An initial program may include only the most acutely toxic chemicals.
▪ But what about patients who are apparently fit and healthy until they suffer a massive exposure to toxic man-made chemicals?
▪ You want some weirdo skulking around the aisles, spraying toxic chemicals all over the place?
▪ Numerous instances of the dumping or abandonment of toxic chemicals and other materials have been discovered.
▪ Entire coastal bays and lagoons along the coast have been fouled by oil spills and the runoff of toxic chemicals.
▪ Army scatter-spray these toxic chemicals from planes.
▪ These secretive facilities house the deadly legacies of the Cold War: nuclear weapons, radioactive waste and toxic chemicals.
■ NOUN
business
▪ Meanwhile Hobor predicts that the speciality chemical businesses will continue to grow through small niche acquisitions as well as internal growth through new products.
▪ Coalite sale Anglo United is preparing to sell Coalite Chemicals, its speciality chemical business.
▪ In addition, the impact of economic recession in key markets affected margins in our downstream oil and chemicals businesses.
▪ Our organic chemicals businesses have survived the recession very well by designing new products and identifying new applications.
▪ We shall also be receiving £11 million from as their contribution towards putting their organic chemicals business into a joint venture with.
▪ The decline in earnings reflected the more difficult trading environment experienced by our downstream oil and chemicals businesses.
company
▪ This involves turning a conventional chemical company almost upside down.
▪ The world's fourth-biggest chemical company, with its 15,000 products and 600 locations worldwide, has not impressed the stock market.
▪ The Commission imposed fines on three chemicals companies on Dec. 19, 1990, for operating an illegal cartel in soda ash.
▪ We are, after all, a large chemical company, and a very small oil company.
▪ An executive from an international chemical company has given up the rat race to run a plant nursery.
industry
▪ Roith came to his job in June last year from a career in the oil and chemicals industry.
▪ Biotechnology will surely play a vital role in any future chemicals industry.
▪ However, there is little sign that it will ever produce compounds on the scale required by the heavy organic chemicals industry.
▪ Particular attention was paid to the floor coverings, textile and chemicals industries.
▪ Consequently, the manufacture of base fertilizers is concentrated amongst large-scale firms who tend to be part of the wider chemical industry.
▪ Pulp, paper, viscose and fine chemical industries generate huge volumes of sodium sulphate byproduct.
▪ But developing a large chemical industry needs capital, and to run it needs energy.
plant
▪ It could be seen any day in the car parks attached to various chemical plants in the Runcorn area.
▪ As a result western companies have been especially reluctant to buy eastern chemical plants and other polluting or energy-intensive businesses.
▪ The mercury had been discharged from a local chemical plant.
reaction
▪ Whether a particular chemical reaction is likely to occur is related to the change in free energy involved.
▪ Carbon dioxide is released in the ensuing chemical reaction.
▪ Proteins work as enzymes, catalysing particular chemical reactions.
▪ Often a single chemical reaction is not sufficient to synthesize a useful end-product.
▪ Ozone is also decomposed through other chemical reactions.
▪ Protein molecules called enzymes are machines in the sense that each one causes a particular chemical reaction to take place.
▪ However, ozone also participates in complex chemical reactions involving trace substances in the stratosphere.
■ VERB
add
▪ Farmers who add the chemicals to animal feed pour yet more into the environment.
▪ In May 1992, Game and Fish was desperately trying to save the lake by adding a copper-based chemical called Cutrine-Plus.
▪ Workers add chemicals to remove impurities such as sulphides.
▪ The recommendation is to avoid attempting to remove algae by adding chemicals to the aquarium water.
contain
▪ Tobacco smoke contains thousands of different chemicals which are released into the air as particles and gases.
▪ These rocks, he says, contain the same chemicals that are Supersaturated in the hot springs today.
▪ It has long been known that amphibian skin contains strong chemicals.
▪ The new technology requires the installation of a wall, which contains a chemical that cleanses the water as it flows through.
▪ Stolen chemicals: A car containing hazardous chemicals was stolen in South Hylton, Sunderland.
▪ The smoke emitted from the chimneys of incinerators contains a cocktail of chemicals and heavy metals.
▪ Its alarm pheromone contains over thirty different chemicals.
produce
▪ Several produce subtle chemical secretions which actually interfere with crop growth.
▪ They produce chemicals that are toxic to their pests.
▪ Some have modified cells that are capable of producing luminous chemicals.
▪ The herrings and preservative had reacted together and produced a chemical which was poisonous to mink.
▪ It is an unusual technological challenge to be certain of the market and racing to produce the chemical to meet it.
▪ Nature produces many chemicals in two forms that are mirror images of each other - so-called left-handed and right-handed molecules.
▪ For a brief period artificial fibres were produced in chemical works.
release
▪ Carbon dioxide is released in the ensuing chemical reaction.
▪ Sewage plants that turn sludge into safer materials certainly help the environment, but they do release some chemicals.
▪ Electrical equipment is a source of low radiation and it also releases chemicals when warm.
▪ Additionally, this waste is a potential source of pollution when it degrades, releasing undesirable chemicals into the soil and air.
▪ Even with the lids on tightly, they release minute amounts of chemicals which may be dangerous if they accumulate.
▪ During acupuncture the body releases natural chemicals which relieve pain and make the patient feel relaxed and well.
▪ It involved 14 groups of facial muscles and it releases chemicals to the brain that help combat depression.
▪ The first cell releases a chemical called a neurotransmitter into the synaptic gap.
use
▪ Fresh food grown organically - without using chemicals - is better for your health.
▪ Other strategies use natural chemicals called pheromones to disrupt insect reproduction.
▪ Nine other sites in Oakland use similar lethal chemicals.
▪ And as they use more plastic, chemicals and metals, so what they discard becomes increasingly durable and potentially poisonous.
▪ Because of using the chemicals in the experiments, I was getting a rash.
▪ The tanks can be used for storing chemicals, food, acids, oils, sewage and other bulk materials.
▪ Farmers must apply for permits to use the new chemicals and attend training sessions, Minch said.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a highly toxic chemical
▪ Farmers are moving away from the use of chemicals and pesticides.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Because of using the chemicals in the experiments, I was getting a rash.
▪ Eventually a more effective pump was installed which removed both offensive chemicals and colour.
▪ Folic acid, a B vitamin, reduces heart-attack risks by lowering a potentially deadly blood chemical called homocysteine.
▪ Kitchen chemicals, such as detergents, are bad for nails because they strip away natural oils.
▪ Needles had already been inserted in his arms to deliver the fatal mix of chemicals.
▪ Swallow your chemicals, swallow them fast, and get back inside.
II.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
additive
▪ According to Hocking, paper cups can not be recycled because they contain chemical additives.
▪ These deer are grass-fed; growth hormones or other chemical additives are not used.
▪ It claims that the stringent tests applied to chemical additives would lead to unacceptable delays in the introduction of genetically-altered foods.
agent
▪ Chemical Disinfection Many chemical agents are used for disinfection.
▪ A hand-held chemical agent monitor determines whether any contaminants are still present.
▪ To prevent this happening chemical agents known as sequestrants are used which bind up the residues preventing them from dropping out of solution.
▪ Some military officials have asserted that the effects of exposure to chemical agents would have been evident among those troops almost immediately.
analysis
▪ As a multi-skilled employee, her shifts involve chemical analysis, production monitoring and work as a colourist.
▪ It is also important that the chemical analysis of the specimen be started within 20 minutes of drawing the specimen. 191.
▪ Ceramics Two general approaches have been much used: thin-section petrography and chemical analysis of the body fabric or composition.
▪ It remains one of the most sensitive methods for chemical analysis ever developed.
▪ Part of the bile samples were frozen at -20°C until chemical analysis.
▪ Typically, the chemical analysis for each sample yields results on over twenty elements.
▪ The chemical analysis of precious metal artefacts can be difficult because their value and decorative finish usually prevent sampling.
change
▪ Atomic theory explained chemical change as the rearrangement of unchanging atoms, and therefore in a sense as superficial.
▪ If the patient had polio, the fluid showed cellular and chemical changes consistent enough for physicians to diagnose the disease.
▪ This triggers chemical changes in your body, which reacts as if threatened by a foreign substance.
▪ Fighting for its life causes chemical changes in the flesh.
▪ The material responds to the pattern of spots, undergoing chemical changes at the bright ones.
composition
▪ The air samples could give scientists vital information about long-term changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere.
▪ Irons come in a variety of classes with different crystal structures, chemical compositions, and inclusions of other minerals.
▪ Glaze chemical composition also affects its absorption of light.
▪ How did the planets pick up the necessary angular momentum, and why do the planets have different chemical compositions?
▪ Can astronomers deduce, from the chemical composition of the leftover stars, how big it was?
▪ Other chemical sediments are also characterized by their chemical composition in relation to origin.
▪ Doing this changed the chemical composition of the atmosphere, ocean and surface rock.
▪ Although they share the same chemical composition and crystal form, emerald is by far the more valuable.
compound
▪ Their oxygen is kept not as a gas, but as a chemical compound.
▪ Vent water is enriched in reduced chemical compounds, especially hydrogen sulfide.
▪ The inert gases are so called because they do not readily form chemical compounds.
▪ In nature, the elements form stable chemical compounds with each other, usually involving oxygen.
▪ The criminals also sold a chemical compound they claimed the law mandated to make made wheelchair access ramps and floors slip resistant.
▪ About a hundred chemical compounds were continuously measured in the air, soil, and water throughout the whole structure.
▪ Like all chemical compounds, minerals are homogeneous: A mineral can not be separated mechanically into different substances.
dependency
▪ Anyway, chemical dependency is easier to study than other sorts.
energy
▪ Overall labour requirement is minimised by the use of heat and chemical energy in the soaking process.
▪ In effect, they convert the energy of the electromagnetic radiation into chemical energy.
▪ But now this energy was in an easily useable form - chemical energy.
▪ For example, when coal is burned, chemical energy is transformed into thermal energy.
▪ By means of photosynthesis, plants convert the radiant energy of the sun into chemical energy.
▪ These allow a store of chemical energy to be converted to electrical energy as required.
▪ The technique of splitting water to release chemical energy is half of the process known as photosynthesis.
▪ Chemicals: Used in machines chemicals replace direct manual energy such as wiping, scrubbing and scraping with chemical energy.
engineer
▪ This is based on calculations performed by chemical engineers and also on experimental trials carried out in a laboratory or pilot plant.
▪ My father a chemical engineer way out ahead of most of his peers.
▪ What do you do if you are a bored chemical engineer in Linden, New Jersey?
engineering
▪ They were the basis of the first textbook on chemical engineering which Davis published in 1901.
▪ David Rumschitzki, a professor of chemical engineering, said that he virtually never saw a student who began in mid-level remediation.
▪ Wirral-born Mike joined the company in 1979 from Newcastle University where he gained a chemical engineering degree.
▪ A leaning toward chemistry and chemical engineering was no doubt kindled in some way by a Mickey Mouse comic strip.
▪ He undoubtedly made a major contribution, not only to the profession of chemical engineering but to technology and technological education generally.
▪ His work led to the formation in 1919 of the chemical engineering group of the Society of Chemical Industry.
▪ The research activities of the department are very wide, encompassing most areas of chemical engineering.
▪ After a short period Lymn took Rambush into partnership, forming the gas and chemical engineering firm of Lymn &038; Rambush.
fertilisers
▪ They say it wouldn't be necessary at all if farmers used less chemical fertilisers on their land.
▪ Four more test orchards were managed conventionally, with the full arsenal of chemical fertilisers and pesticides.
▪ They have to decide whether or not to use chemical fertilisers, insecticides, herbicides, fungicides.
fertilizer
▪ Without earthworms and other soil life, no amount of cultivations and chemical fertilizers will build and sustain true structure and fertility.
▪ The other was an agricultural revolution based on chemical fertilizers, irrigation, and improved seed strains that dramatically expanded food supplies.
▪ It's based on chemical fertilizer, I've bags of the stuff.
▪ Another useful salt is plain old chemical fertilizer.
▪ The long-term dangers of land degradation from irrigation and chemical fertilizers are growing.
▪ The colonial world can be hit by a shortage in chemical fertilizers.
▪ I suppose such things were happy on our land because we never put chemical fertilizers on it.
plant
▪ Other types of cancer were also found to be higher in geographical areas where chemical plants were situated.
▪ This and subsequent work contributed significantly to the current understanding of hazards from chemical plants and lead to special legislation.
▪ Don't grow a chemical plant in your fridge.
▪ The latter half of the book should be essential reading for all chemists and engineers working on chemical plants.
pollutant
▪ The true effect on wild dolphin populations of prolonged exposure to chemical pollutants is hard to measure.
▪ Compounding scarcity is the growing problem of water degradation caused by saltwater intrusions, chemical pollutants, and human sewage.
▪ It contains fewer chemical pollutants, which asthmatics are often allergic to, and so helps to prevent asthma attacks.
▪ Whilst our cities wheeze from the effects of chemical pollutants there is another form of pollution gathering in the atmosphere.
pollution
▪ However, there is abundant anecdotal evidence of the effects of chemical pollution on the populations of small cetaceans inhabiting industrialised areas.
▪ For humans, the chemical pollution threatens our fertility, intelligence and our very survival as a species, the environmentalists say.
▪ Because of chemical pollution of rivers, the cost of producing safe, palatable drinking water has risen dramatically.
process
▪ All green plants depend on light to power the chemical processes by which they synthesise their body substances from simple elements.
▪ Throughout their monthlong stay, they relied or mechanical and chemical processes to recycle their air and water.
▪ Such a situation does often arise, for example in the feedback control of a chemical process.
▪ It was a remarkable discovery, a previously unknown chemical process that Knittle had stumbled on to.
▪ Clearly, there is need for more detailed work on thermodynamic and chemical processes in small gasifiers.
▪ Their goal is to recycle all air, water and solid wastes using mechanical and chemical processes as well as plants.
▪ Cold inhibits or prevents plant growth and slows down chemical processes in soils, prolonging the period of maturation.
▪ The relative abundance of these elements is increasingly being used to trace chemical processes in the mantle, crust, and oceans.
product
▪ Small quantities of chemical products and consumer goods are exported to neighbouring Arab countries.
▪ South Coast processes and stores oil and chemical products.
▪ Handling chemical products of high quality is not easy.
▪ While there are relatively few chemicals usable for cleaning and disinfection there are many, probably thousands, of chemical products.
▪ This may include labour and power as well as chemical products and equipment with separate metering of electricity and gas supplies.
▪ The inflammatory cell infiltrate and its chemical products may influence intestinal permeability in various ways.
▪ Which parts, for instance, of a car, a television, a house, are based on chemical products?
▪ They are used to produce 90 percent of all chemical products at some stage in their manufacture.
property
▪ It briefly describes the origins, uses and importance of these elements before considering the factors underlying their chemical properties.
▪ It is easier to observe and measure electrical activity than it is to understand the chemical properties.
reaction
▪ Applications here focus on using gigabit networks to combine the processing power of multiple supercomputers for climate and chemical reaction modeling.
▪ At one time it was thought that all chemical reactions were exothermic.
▪ Commercially pure ethanol is produced using a variety of chemical reactions to eliminate the water.
▪ The movement of trace-elements through the environment A large number of chemical reactions take place when trace metals move through the environment.
▪ That released the firing pin, which in turn fired the percussion cap and triggered a chemical reaction that generated oxygen.
▪ The rates of chemical reactions are dealt with in detail in chapter 9.
▪ Thus chemical reactions occur in the vapor phase.
sensitivity
▪ It could be that some underlying defect opens the way to both candidiasis and chemical sensitivity.
▪ This has led some doctors to dismiss the whole idea of chemical sensitivity and claim that all such patients are hyperventilating.
▪ This suggests that there is some other deficiency as well in those with chemical sensitivity - perhaps a defect in another enzyme.
▪ This explanation also fails to explain the observed link with chemical sensitivity.
▪ At present, there is no good explanation for the link between candidiasis, food intolerance and chemical sensitivity.
▪ So it seems unlikely that chemical sensitivity is allergic in origin.
signal
▪ Such chemical signals would have been the forerunner of modern-day hormones.
▪ The chemical signal can be recognized by other defensive organisms in our bodies.
▪ But the speed of transmission is high for the transport of a chemical signal in the phloem.
▪ To cross this gap, an action potential must be converted from an electrical signal to a chemical signal.
▪ Perhaps a chemical signal is passed between the cells, providing another cue that the correct spot had been reached.
structure
▪ During this period she published no fewer than ten books and articles in her field-the relationship between chemical structure and carcinogenicity.
▪ No scientific lecture is ever given without slides or other visual aids, especially if chemical structures are to be shown.
▪ The latter are particularly helpful since cholesterol becomes harmful when its chemical structure is changed through oxidisation.
▪ In spite of the fascinating biological response, the ultimate chemical structure had turned out to be remarkably uncomplicated.
▪ They have been applied to evolving software, hardware designs, chemical structures, music, pictures and video.
▪ Of particular interest are genes that reduce the amount of a substance called lignin, or that weaken lignin's chemical structure.
▪ Its chemical structure, for example, indicated that it should be a good electrical insulator.
▪ Figure 1 shows the chemical structures of PABA-UDCA disulphate and PABA-UDCA.
substance
▪ This symposium will address the question of effects of chemical substances on reproductive systems to both females and males.
▪ She took him to a place called the Loneliness Bar, where the hostesses wore swimsuits treated with a chemical substance.
▪ The naming or nomenclature of chemical substances falls broadly into two categories: inorganic nomenclature and organic nomenclature.
▪ Women Inventors All matter is composed of chemical substances.
▪ The latest system lists over 68000 chemical substances, their hazards and remedial actions.
▪ Some chemical substances have the potential to crystallize in two alternative ways.
▪ Mixtures All chemical substances, whether elements, compounds or mixtures, are made up of three types of particles.
treatment
▪ Any chemical treatment will leave hair less resilient than before and it should be treated with care accordingly.
▪ Some chemical treatments can affect foam media, but a filter pad is immune.
▪ Hunter, one can assume, would have advocated chemical treatment of the entire body.
▪ Princes Metal An alloy of copper and zinc, which after chemical treatment and burnishing, has a gilt-like appearance.
▪ As with any chemical treatment, colour can cause hair to become dry and prone to splitting, especially on the ends.
▪ There is no chemical treatment, but it might be operable.
warfare
▪ Unlike snakes, lizards have not specialised in chemical warfare.
▪ It was during the episode of Supersense on chemical warfare and trap strategy.
▪ The Soviet Union's response has been a relentless increase in its chemical warfare capability.
▪ The only other type of mammal to employ chemical warfare is the duck-billed platypus.
▪ There was also the threat of chemical warfare.
▪ But the war was over, and the pressure to investigate chemical warfare agents disappeared.
▪ The outbreak of a new war made defence against chemical warfare agents once again an urgent problem.
waste
▪ In the North Sea, Greenpeace swimmers turned back dump ships carrying chemical wastes.
weapon
▪ When the toad is attacked, this chemical weapon oozes out as a thick, creamy liquid.
▪ More than a score of nations now seeks or possesses chemical weapons.
▪ My relatives and friends lived in fear of nuclear attack or bombardment by chemical weapons.
▪ Resolution 44/115 on chemical weapons was adopted without a vote.
▪ Worldwide availability of chemical weapons will be higher, and we will know less about other countries' chemical activities.
▪ One application for the X-ray destruction method could be in the politically sensitive area of destroying chemical weapons.
▪ Next week he will appeal to the Senate to ratify a global treaty to ban chemical weapons.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
chemical engineering
▪ a chemical analysis of the skeletons
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ For example, the natural arrangement of the chemical elements in Mendeleyev's periodic table has groups of traits reappearing cyclically.
▪ In Zurich, stocks eased, led down by the chemical sector.
▪ Rather, it was based on the fact that chemical weapons are not useful for us.
▪ Samples of rock from them have provided researchers with most of their knowledge of the chemical makeup of the mantle.
▪ The hon. Member for Londonderry, East asked about emissions from the chemical incinerator at the Coalite works.
▪ The quick way is not to use any artificial fertilisers, chemical sprays or dusts.
▪ Traditionally, the rare earths have been used as catalysts in the chemical industry and in flints for cigarette lighters.
Wikipedia

Chemical (disambiguation)

A chemical substance is a material with a specific chemical composition.

Chemical may also refer to:

  • Chemical industry
  • Drug, any substance that, when absorbed into the body of a living organism, alters normal bodily function
  • Chemistry, relating to the science of matter and the changes it undergoes
  • "Chemical" (Crashdïet song), 2010
  • "Chemical" (Joseph Arthur song), 2000
  • "Chemicals", a song by Scars on Broadway from the album Scars on Broadway
  • "Chemicals" (song), a 2013 song by Love and Death
  • Chemicals (EP), a 2012 EP by Love and Death
  • Chemicals (Smile Empty Soul album)

Chemical (Joseph Arthur song)

"Chemical" is the first single from Joseph Arthur's second studio album Come to Where I'm From. The single was released in the UK and Australia on June 26, 2000 via Real World Records and Virgin Records. The single is long out of print and is now hard to find. Joseph very rarely played "Chemical" live--the first known version was in New York City in March 1998. A music video was produced for the song, directed by Anton Corbijn (however, the video does not appear on the Directors Label DVD The Work of Director Anton Corbijn). The video features Joseph as two characters: the first as himself, playing his guitar and singing the song, and the other as a man clad in black with a fake moustache and temporary tattoos. Joseph's friend Valdet builds a sculpture behind Joseph through the video.

Chemical (Crashdïet song)

Chemical is the second single from the Swedish glam metal band Crashdïet's 2010 album Generation Wild. It was released on 19 September and was written by Crashdïet's guitarist Martin Sweet and the band Peep Show's singer Johnny Gunn.

Wiktionary

chemical

a. 1 (label en obsolete) Of or relating to alchemy. 2 Of or relating to chemistry. 3 Of or relating to a material or processes not commonly found in nature or in a particular product. n. 1 (label en chemistry sciences) Any specific chemical element or chemical compound or alloy. 2 (label en colloquial) An artificial chemical compound. 3 (label en slang) An addictive drug.

WordNet

chemical

  1. adj. relating to or used in chemistry; "chemical engineer"; "chemical balance" [syn: chemic]

  2. of or made from or using substances produced by or used in reactions involving atomic or molecular changes; "chemical fertilizer"

chemical

n. produced by or used in a reaction involving changes in atoms or molecules

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Chemical

Chemical \Chem"ic*al\, a. Pertaining to chemistry; characterized or produced by the forces and operations of chemistry; employed in the processes of chemistry; as, chemical changes; chemical combinations.

Chemical attraction or Chemical affinity. See under Attraction.

Chemical

Chemical \Chem"ic*al\, n. A substance used for producing a chemical effect; a reagent.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

chemical

1570s, "relating to chemistry," from chemic "of alchemy" (a worn-down derivative of Medieval Latin alchimicus; see alchemy) + -al (1). In early use also of alchemy. Related: Chemically.

chemical

1747, from chemical (adj.). Related: Chemicals.

Usage examples of "chemical".

Aubrey waved the probe of a Bailey Aardwolf magnetic anomaly and chemical detector past L.

The more strictly chemical methods are rendered troublesome by the oxide being insoluble in acids, resembling in this respect the gangue with which it is associated.

He forgot the Valley of the ashes at Exxon PetroChemical of the Damned, Dow Chemical, Texaco refinery, and standing hundreds of feet in the air atop the big iron ironclad tanks that he thought were once swimming pools for the gods to match the fluted Aeonian smokestack.

By this aestheticizing, Jack misses the more relevant loop of production, consumption, and pollution that have created the very chemical spill that may cause the death he seeks to block from his thoughts.

Furthermore, the idea that different kinds of corpuscles, or atoms, could combine with one another was the first step toward understanding the nature of chemical reactions.

Finally, chemical combination happens when one or more atoms of one element are joined to one or more atoms of another.

At this time, chemical notion had not yet been standardized, and Dalton used pictorial symbols of different kinds to represent the atoms of different elements.

On the contrary, his idea was significant because it was a theory that explained how chemical compounds are formed and because the idea of atoms with different relative weights made it possible to turn chemistry into a quantitative science.

The first is a series of autocatalytic chemical reactions concentrated within tiny vesicles whose skins are self-organizing lipid bilayers.

In 1811 Avogadro, in answer to the confusing problems of combining chemical weights, invented the molecule.

The barometer dropped and the sky turned a chemical green, and the breakers were full of sand and dead baitfish when they smacked on the beach.

The first was to try to produce, through X-rays, ultraviolet light, or chemicals, mutant bees that might then be crossbred with the Africans.

Bionetics Laboratories, a subsidiary of Litton Industries, under contract to the National Cancer Institute, on the effects of 123 chemical compounds in bioassays on 20,000 mice covering periods of up to eighty-four weeks.

Kill the monkeys-give them lethal injections-burn their carcasses, and drench the entire building with chemicals and fumes-a major biohazard operation.

Afterward, a second chemical, sodium bisulfite, was used to break down the gas.