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Chaise

thumb|A one-horse chaise thumb|A three-wheeled "Handchaise", Germany, around 1900, designed to be pushed by a person

A chaise, sometimes called chay or shay, is a light two- or four-wheeled traveling or pleasure carriage, with a folding hood or calash top for one or two people.

Chaise (river)

The Chaise, also known as the Monthoux, is a mountain river of eastern France. It flows through the departments Savoie and Haute-Savoie. It is a right tributary of the Arly which it joins in Ugine where, in the mid nineteenth century, it was crossed by a wooden bridge.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

chaise

1701, "pleasure carriage," from French chaise "chair" (15c.), dialectal variant of chaire (see chair (n.)) due to 15c.-16c. Parisian accent swapping of -r- and -s-, a habit often satirized by French writers. French chair and chaise then took respectively the senses of "high seat, throne, pulpit" and "chair, seat." Chaise lounge (1800) is corruption of French chaise longue "long chair," the second word confused in English with lounge.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Chaise

Chaise \Chaise\ (sh[=a]z), n. [F. chaise seat, or chair, chaise or carriage, for chaire, from a peculiar Parisian pronunciation. See Chair.]

  1. A two-wheeled carriage for two persons, with a calash top, and the body hung on leather straps, or thorough-braces. It is usually drawn by one horse.

  2. Loosely, a carriage in general.
    --Cowper. [1913 Webster] ||

Wiktionary

chaise

n. 1 An open, horse-drawn carriage for one or two people, usually with one horse and two wheels. 2 A chaise longue. 3 A post chaise.

WordNet

chaise

  1. n. a long chair; for reclining [syn: chaise longue, daybed]

  2. a carriage consisting of two wheels and calash top; drawn by a single horse [syn: shay]

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

Usage examples of "chaise".

Through the sweltering summer, Adams never missed a day in the Senate, rolling in each morning from Richmond Hill in a one-horse chaise, not the fine carriage portrayed in hostile newspaper accounts.

Grandmother Adelia reclines on a chaise, a heavy-lidded, handsome woman, in many draperies and a long double string of pearls and a plunging, lace-bordered neckline, her white forearms boneless as rolled chicken.

Miss Bingley offered her the carriage, and she only wanted a little pressing to accept it, when Jane testified such concern in parting with her that Miss Bingley was obliged to convert the offer of the chaise into an invitation to remain at Netherfield for the present.

The sun had just risen on one of the loveliest vales of Caernarvonshire, as a travelling chaise and six swept up to the door of a princely mansion, so situated as to command a prospect of the fertile and extensive domains, the rental of which filled the coffers of its rich owner, having a beautiful view of the Irish channel in the distance.

He looked in at the Cock, spoke to his man, took a chaise back to Ashgrove, saddled his mare and rode some miles towards Lisa before branching off into a series of lanes, one of which would have brought him to a farm belonging to Sir Joseph if, before reaching it, he had not turned along a path leading to the roughest of rough and sandy pasture to a neglected wood, one of the few in England where an entomologist had a reasonable chance of finding that brilliant creature Calosoma sycophanta, as well as no less than three of the tiger beetles.

The daybed may have been a rare work from the studio of wunderkind furniture designer Ben Zen, but as far as Samantha was concerned, it certainly put the longue in chaise.

In Fusina I took a two-wheeled chaise, for I was so tired that I could not have performed the journey on horseback, and I reached the Dolo, where I was recognized and horses were refused me.

He made no reply, and followed me bareheaded till he saw me get into my chaise and drive off, and I have no doubt he gave thanks to God for his light escape.

By the new main entrance from the high road beyond the town, through lofty Greekish gates, came the lords and lairds, in yellow coaches, gigs, and post chaises.

Eager to see Oriana and her handsome Manxman together for the first time, she was disappointed that the singer and Suke Barry had traveled in one chaise, the baronet and his manservant in another.

Dona Elizabete drowsed on a chaise longue in the dappled shade of palms and one huge monkeypod tree.

I found her in her chaise lounge as usual with her champagne, and some champagne sherbert, concluding the marathon drinking bout that had begun at dinner.

She was in the backyard, stretched out on a chaise in a sunsuit that made her belly look like a watermelon in a laundry bag.

I attended a young lady in a chaise to Witney, where we staid all night, and in our return, the next morning, to Oxford, I met one of my cronies, who acquainted me with sufficient news concerning myself to make me turn my horse another way.

The chaise, which took up a good half of the wall next to the woodstove, had seemed too large and in the way before, but now Yana found it inviting.