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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

cast

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be cast in a mould (=be very like something )
▪ He didn't want to be cast in the mould of being an academic.
cast (a) gloom over sth (=make people feel sad)
▪ His ill health had cast a gloom over the Christmas holidays.
cast a spell (on sb) (=do some magic)
▪ Suddenly everyone froze, as if a wizard had cast a spell on them.
cast adrift
▪ Several of the lifeboats were still afloat a month after being cast adrift.
cast down
▪ She could not bear to see him so miserable and cast down.
cast iron
cast light (=send light onto something)
▪ the gold circle of light cast by the lamp
cast sb in a rolewritten (= give someone a role, especially one they do not want)
▪ He found himself cast in the role of guide and translator.
cast sb in a role (=give them a role)
▪ Television producers would not cast her in lead roles.
cast your vote (=vote in a political election)
▪ Harkin won 74 percent of the votes cast.
cast...ballots
▪ Only 22% of voters cast their ballots.
casting aspersions on
▪ No one is casting aspersions on you or your men, Major.
casting vote
cast...slur on (=criticize)
▪ How dare she cast a slur on my character?
cast/throw a glance (=look quickly)
▪ She cast a shy glance toward Shelby.
cast/throw a shadow (=make it appear)
▪ The building cast a shadow across the narrow street.
cast/throw doubt on sth (=make people unsure about something)
▪ Research has cast doubt on the safety of mobile phones.
central casting
▪ Wearing black shoes and a pinstripe suit, he looked like central casting’s idea of the perfect civil servant.
die casting
plaster cast
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
about
▪ This sent them on their way without having to trouble too much over casting about for tracks.
▪ They began casting about for an alternative.
▪ Frantically he cast about, searching the ground.
▪ Finally mustering the courage to act, Blue reaches into his bag of disguises and casts about for a new identity.
▪ Cupped the small flame with a trembling hand. Cast about for a taper.
▪ The constitution prohibits him from staying another, so he is casting about for ways to hold on to power.
▪ He cast about desperately for something to say.
▪ In April, about 30 frustrated human resources managers met to discuss their staffing woes and cast about for solutions.
around
▪ So I cast around for somewhere else and we found this, in a very poor state of repair.
▪ Again she began casting around for help.
▪ He's casting around trying to find a way of presenting himself that's different from his past life.
▪ The mind finds it much easier to work upon something than to cast around in a search.
▪ We can adapt our theories, or cast around for fresh ones, to suit our intuitions.
▪ He cast around for somewhere to put them, and at once Mei Ling took them and gave them to a waiting servant.
▪ After casting around a little, he appointed Chamberlain himself in Davidson's place.
aside
▪ We should now cast aside all the political rhetoric of the campaign.
▪ It is too much to expect musicians to deliberately cast aside the fringe benefits of success.
▪ Every impediment to flight was cast aside.
▪ Everything else was cast aside, beginning with even elementary care over arrangements to get there on the night.
▪ University officials have displayed no sense of moral obligation toward a female student cast aside in the rush to pander to Phillips.
▪ That is my point: you have cast aside the probability of future happiness on a whim.
▪ Yet the problems are not of such proportions that hope has been cast aside.
away
▪ Let Marion be reminded of what she had cast away.
▪ Leaders are either recast or cast away.
▪ A time to gather stones together, a time to cast away stones.
down
▪ He was exasperated, but not cast down.
▪ Every twenty seconds their elongated selves were flung before him, their shadows cast down by the lighthouse beam.
▪ It was of a suitable Ash Wednesday character and left the congregation feeling sober and a little cast down.
▪ The slaves rose and backed out of the chamber, their eyes cast down.
▪ Back at Cultra, Jessica Roberts was also cast down.
▪ It is rising so high that makes us afraid, he thought, lest we fall or are cast down.
▪ He cast down monsters and destroyed Chaos warriors with a word.
▪ Women cast down, on whom life had left its mark, were to him sisters under the skin regardless of station.
off
▪ You then knit one or two rows and cast off.
▪ Endued with evenness of mind, one casts off in this very life both good deeds and evil deeds.
▪ Knit 1 row and cast off in same manner.
▪ Women are casting off minimalism, starting at the accessory level.
▪ One who would speak your name and seeks to know the woman in you! Cast off the glooms.
▪ Guests were encouraged to cast off their inhibitions.
▪ Luis, it's high time you were off watch! Cast off!
▪ She had cast off the lines.
out
▪ In 1st century palatine those who were lepers were literally cast out of society.
▪ He received the aged Oedipus whom everyone else had cast out.
▪ The boat is rowed slowly round the lough whilst an angler sitting in the stern casts out at right angles.
▪ The routine, in fact, is tedious. Cast out.
▪ Have you nothing to say to me, cast out here like a leper?
▪ The thugs and wreckers have been cast out.
▪ As a result she is cast out by society and some members of her family.
■ NOUN
back
▪ He racked his brains, he cast his mind back.
▪ Again, more in control of matters, he cast his mind back.
▪ Oliver cast the occasional glance back.
ballot
▪ Pupils will cast their ballot papers in mock polling booths before school and at morning break on the day.
▪ The majority of eligible voters said they would rather not cast ballots, leading to the worst percentage voter turnout since 1924.
▪ He praised the smooth running of the election, and denied reports that people had been forced to cast their ballots.
▪ Of more than 1, 300 people registered by Hermandad last year, nearly 800 reportedly cast ballots Nov. 5.
▪ But the only real problem was controlling the crowds of voters pressing forward to cast their ballots.
▪ Just four Republicans cast ballots for some one other than Gingrich, six short of the number needed to block his selection.
▪ Less than half the potential voters bothered to cast their ballot.
▪ Less than half of the voting-age population cast a ballot in November.
cloud
▪ Armagh's injury worries cast a cloud over their preparations and Fermanagh could mount a smash and grab raid this time.
▪ Nice touches include steam vents that cast lingering clouds over the courses and new audio cues to warn of danger.
▪ The housing directory will help bridge this gap - although the proposed legal aid cuts do cast a cloud over this.
die
▪ Four days later Truman cast the die.
doubt
▪ They have also cast doubt on his client's character by implying there's been some sort of fraud.
▪ Yet the history of the bathhouse closures in the mid eighties casts strong doubt on this assertion.
▪ Today's report must cast real doubt on the degree to which that is now in prospect.
▪ In the final section, I will begin to cast some doubt on the terms in which the debate has been set.
▪ However, developers have cast doubt on whether the funds available are sufficient and reach the areas of greatest need.
▪ Both studies cast doubt on individuals' awareness of tax changes and therefore suggest a low labour response.
▪ Journalists and diplomatic sources, however, cast doubt on the government's version.
▪ Such questions cast serious doubts on the likelihood of to having no meaning in these uses.
eye
▪ He cast a professional eye over the report.
▪ Bruises cast shadows around his eyes and nose.
▪ And cast your eye to the mantelpiece.
▪ And I in turn cleared my throat and cast my eyes downward, away from hers.
▪ Gurder cast an apprehensive eye over his shoulder.
▪ The professor shrugged, casting an eye over Davide's good jacket, to inform him that his information was unnecessary.
▪ He also casts his eye over the proposed law changes.
▪ The less pubescent diner can cast a detached eye on this ritual from six Formica-topped tables inside the tiny deli-restaurant.
glance
▪ As Rose left she cast a meaning glance at Gabriel, but she did not speak.
▪ He cast a genial glance at one of his apprentices.
▪ They cast furtive glances at one another.
▪ I was playing with her as usual and casting furtive glances at her six heavy gold bangles.
▪ John le Grant sat with the others, casting a glance at the pitcher as he passed.
▪ As he passed through he cast one last glance behind him to assure himself he was free of pursuers.
▪ What had become of the suspicious anti-warrior of the sixties, casting reproachful glances at the Temple University computer center?
iron
▪ The hull contained a mass of dissimilar metals: steel, cast and malleable iron, brass. bronze and lead.
▪ A kitchen appliance part today injection-molded from plastic then would have been cast from iron.
▪ Traditional fender and cast iron canopy in a choice of two trim finishes: black or brass.
▪ They were heavy consumers of iron, cast iron and steel.
▪ Cannons are cast from iron or bronze and are built into solid carriages.
▪ He designed and made wooden copies of machinery parts to be cast in iron and steel in sand molds.
▪ The rainwater goods, a mixture of plastic, asbestos and cast iron were fit for the scrap heap.
▪ But cast iron had severe limitations.
lead
▪ He cast Nicholson in the lead role and all he needed was a female.
▪ The pre-filming budget had gone up to the then astronomical sixteen million dollars with Tyrone Power cast in the lead.
light
▪ Isabel raised her left hand and peered at the ring in the dim light cast by the clock-candle burning near the bed.
▪ Then it was drawn into the light cast by a battery of exterior spot lamps.
▪ Standing all day on the wet clay floor under the dropping ceiling in the faint light cast by tallow candles was grim.
▪ There was a new moon, and its pale light cast soft shadows in the stillness.
▪ Most low-voltage lights cast a localised beam or a diffused glow.
▪ Even in the dim, flickering light cast by the fire Guy saw all the colour wash out of her face.
▪ The dull light cast thick shadows in the small room where her brother-in-law had worked.
▪ Downstairs Madeleine's hair flamed in the gold circle of light cast by the lamp.
look
▪ She cast a regretful look at the big double bed with its luxurious continental quilt.
▪ As the baby grew older, she cast an envying look at pink.
▪ All he could produce was a stiff upper lip, while young Lady C cast meaningful looks at sturdy gamekeeper Mellors.
▪ A few days after my gift was discovered, Milagros cast me a worried look at dinner.
▪ Snyde came closer, reached out a paw and touched Whillan's flank strangely, casting a lingering look at it.
▪ Hattie Johnson cast an unthinking look at Ezra, her nine-year-old boy.
▪ He automatically steps into the room, casting a melodramatic look over his shoulder.
lot
▪ Hence the casting of lots in choosing between the two men.
▪ Phil Gramm of Texas have now cast their lot with Buchanan.
▪ The Reagan administration had cast its lot with the power companies.
mind
▪ I cast my mind back to our excited departure from Gatwick airport.
▪ She fingered the notes, casting her mind forward.
▪ Let us cast our minds back to the referendum.
▪ As she cast her mind about, she realized that there might be something she was especially fitted for.
▪ He cast his mind back to his homecoming earlier that evening.
▪ He racked his brains, he cast his mind back.
▪ Again, more in control of matters, he cast his mind back.
▪ Time and again, she had cast her mind back to before Maisie was lost in that tragic fire.
net
▪ But this festival casts its net beyond the musical world.
▪ They subsequently directed their personnel officials to cast a wider net when searching for potential employees.
▪ One possibility seems to be that s.61 was intended to cast a wider net of liability than s.62.
▪ The network has to cast a wide net for this talent.
▪ It is clearly possible that we are not casting our net sufficiently wide.
▪ I cast my net wide enough to find parents who vary from house cleaner to fashion designer to electrician to corporate manager.
pall
▪ Few people were talking and the silence of night cast its pall over the city.
▪ But news of a major management bloodletting, impending layoffs and a possible takeover cast a pall over the festivities.
▪ Lessard tries to show that the sins of Stanford White cast a moral pall over the White clan.
▪ But it had cast a pall that had still not lifted.
percent
▪ Kerekou won by an unsurprisingly huge margin: 86 percent of the valid votes cast compared with 16 percent for Amoussou.
▪ In the Sunshine state, residents over age 60 cast about 40 percent of the vote.
▪ Of the votes cast 7 percent were null or void.
role
▪ The Falcons have been cast in the role of curtain-raisers and will open the show on both days.
▪ Deronda resents being cast in the role of listener and mentor.
▪ In his first season at Arsenal he was cast in the role of footballer turned male model.
▪ Once cast in the role of Guardian of Truth and Traditional Wisdom, a scientist ceases to be scientific.
▪ After all Meredith was not alluding to her, any more than he was casting himself in the role of Caesar.
▪ Doctors such as geriatricians and psychiatrists have been cast in the role of fixers and gatekeepers to protect the institutions.
▪ No longer are local authorities cast in the role of protectors of unpopular, run-down schools.
▪ Where else will you be cast in the role of a dolphin?
shadow
▪ Barras conducted a number of interviews that bear moving witness to the long shadow cast by absent fathers.
▪ Minutes later, I could see the tent shadows cast by Jeep headlights dancing across the side of the Huey.
▪ The ever-present shadow cast by Camilla merely served to throw fuel on the flames.
▪ Every twenty seconds their elongated selves were flung before him, their shadows cast down by the lighthouse beam.
▪ The encounter he now saw as an omen, a shadow cast by a coming event.
▪ How successful it is and how widely seen it is determines how long a shadow it casts and for how much time.
▪ Nothing changed except the power of the sun and the angle of the shadows it cast.
▪ The present is the mouse running from the shadow the hawk casts on the earth, and sometimes it escapes.
spell
▪ Roll a dice after each spell is cast.
▪ And again, louder, as if breaking a spell or casting one: Olppajin-saram.
▪ What was this spell he was casting - and how could she ever hope to be free of it?
▪ I thought that, if we were to meet again, he would remove the spell that he had cast over me.
▪ She is afraid you are waking from her spell, casting it off.
▪ The next day, a woman came up to me and asked what sort of spell I had cast on her husband.
▪ Many spells may be cast to create creatures which attack the enemy.
stone
▪ His killer had rifled his wallet before casting the stone into the stream.
▪ Rather, remain calm, let Mailer be Mailer, refrain from casting stones and you will be rewarded.
▪ Let he who is without sin cast the first stone, I may be hearing you say.
▪ A time to gather stones together, a time to cast away stones.
vote
▪ In a typical United Kingdom five-member constituency 250,000 votes might be cast.
▪ Its unintended effect was also to crush a succession of much less well-prepared Republican hopefuls before a single vote had been cast.
▪ The outcome of the election is, at least in simple majority systems, a direct arithmetic consequence of the individual votes cast.
▪ But neither is a vote he wishes to cast.
▪ But he still only just squeaked home, by a margin of 47,080 votes out of 1.9m cast.
▪ In order to be elected, a constituency candidate needs only a plurality of the votes cast.
▪ The number of illiterate adults exceeds by 16 million the entire vote cast for the winner in the 1980 presidential contest.
voter
▪ But the only real problem was controlling the crowds of voters pressing forward to cast their ballots.
▪ Its voters first cast ballots by mail on a state housing initiative in 1993.
▪ Less than half the potential voters bothered to cast their ballot.
▪ Stephanopoulos turned thirty-one as New Hampshire voters cast their primary ballots.
▪ Some middle-class voters have supported the Labour Party and about one-third of working-class voters have traditionally cast their ballots for Conservative candidates.
▪ By contrast, 11, 000 voters cast early ballots in the recent Super Tuesday presidential primaries.
▪ It is surely a fundamental principle of fair elections that all voters should cast the same kind of vote.
▪ In one Daleycontrolled precinct, a commentator remembers, 54 voters managed to cast 84 votes.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be written/set/cast in tablets of stone
cast/spread your net wide
▪ Furse spread his net wide, but it did not sink deep.
▪ I cast my net wide enough to find parents who vary from house cleaner to fashion designer to electrician to corporate manager.
▪ It was argued in Chapter 2 that the criminal law ought to spread its net wider where the potential harm is greater.
▪ Later that afternoon the police, who had been diligently searching certain caravans on Turpin's Field, spread their net wider.
▪ We cast our net wider and in a different direction.
cast/throw pearls before swine
draw/cast lots
▪ It is a curious turn around from the days when bondholders pleased to be bought out and were driving to drawing lots!
▪ She took it thoughtfully like some one choosing a straw when drawing lots.
▪ The players alternate between the white and black pieces and draw lots to determine who plays white in today's first game.
▪ Then we drew lots to decide the order in which we should improvise, night by night.
▪ They also took turns administering the city-state, drawing lots to settle who would take on which job.
▪ They drew lots to decide which should first seize his lady, and fortune favored Ephialtes.
▪ Was it to be done by casting lots?
run/cast your eye over sth
▪ A note from Mellowes instructed me to cast my eye over the draft, pronto, for inaccuracies.
▪ Above him Cornelius ran his eye over a box of ancient cane carpet beaters.
▪ And of course Prince also casts his eye over rock too.
▪ He also casts his eye over the proposed law changes.
▪ I cast my eye over the front page of the Telegraph while Anne poured the coffee.
▪ The customs officers run their eyes over us as if we weren't there.
▪ They've even invited Michael Heseltine, care of Spitting Image, to cast his eyes over the exhibition.
the casting couch
the die is cast
throw in/cast your lot with sb/sth
▪ All you have to do is throw in your lot with me.
▪ At the next meeting of the Unionist Cabinet Ministers Boscawen threw in his lot with me.
▪ Desperate to win in the third most conservative state, Bush threw in his lot with the religious right.
▪ I suppose we are right to throw in our lot with them.
▪ Like Dudley Williams, Jamison threw in her lot with Alvin early on, at the start of her career.
▪ She threw in her lot with the Jowles.
▪ The Dance caught on everywhere, and eventually Sitting Bull himself threw in his lot with the shakers.
throw/cast caution to the winds
▪ Anything less truly would be throwing caution to the winds.
▪ My friends and their little daughter went splashing blithely in so I threw caution to the winds and followed.
▪ The two of us threw caution to the winds and raced to the rescue.
throw/shed/cast light on sth
▪ Newly found Aztec artifacts may shed some light on their mysterious culture.
▪ A fretful wind was not enough to open them and shed light on the ruptured earth in which they lay.
▪ An analysis of the results should shed light on the workings of the Northern Ireland labour market.
▪ Geographical comparison of patterns of lawbreaking sometimes throws light on more general differences in social and economic conditions.
▪ He uses relativity to throw light on time and eternity, and indeterminacy to comment on free will.
▪ In addition, the research is expected to shed light on the social consequences of cities' changing economic roles.
▪ Owing to the small sample size, the results can only be expected to shed light on the trends.
▪ Therefore they shed light on the comparative institutional questions with which we are concerned.
▪ This may shed light on Soviet views of such zones.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Cast your line across the current and upstream.
▪ In the tomb they found a statue of a horse cast in bronze.
▪ Sparks leaped as more wood was cast onto the fire.
▪ The meat industry complained that the nutrition chart cast its products in an unfavorable way.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ After the artist's death 28 examples were cast in bronze, only 11 of which now remain in private hands.
▪ But his style casts a dark shadow over the material, rendering it claustrophobic.
▪ Participants will be helped to identify their own angry inner bums, and cast those barriers aside.
▪ Phil Gramm of Texas have now cast their lot with Buchanan.
▪ The same approach can be used where the shade is cast by a wall, fence or building.
▪ This sent them on their way without having to trouble too much over casting about for tracks.
▪ You see everybody casts their tuppence worth into the pool but nobody details the route to a better future.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
entire
▪ The cold air is made even more apparent by the swift footwork when the entire cast jump lightly upwards away from the ground.
▪ The entire cast -- 23 actors portraying inmates portraying fictional characters based on real ones -- inhabit the stage simultaneously.
▪ The entire cast took a step forward.
large
▪ Her large supporting cast never really comes to life, and she allows too many strangely unfocused interruptions to her narrative flow.
▪ Non-playing colleagues rushed him to the local casualty department, where a large plaster cast was fixed on to the injured area.
▪ A large cast of characters acts as her chorus.
▪ Its high quality came from the brilliant device of having the story told by a large cast of characters.
▪ In Catal Huyuk, women slept on large platforms facing cast, towards the rising Sun.
▪ With greatly expanded backstage facilities, the company can do shows with larger casts.
original
▪ Our thanks are due to the original cast for the creation of these offstage characters.
strong
▪ This kind of action needs precise timing and director Mike Alfreds and his 14 strong cast provide the elegantly energetic execution required.
▪ Artistic Director Barbara Oliver has done more than put together a strong cast.
▪ Covent Garden field a strong cast, especially Rene Kollo's marvellous Max.
▪ Southern poverty also continues to show a strong racial cast.
supporting
▪ A supporting cast of special guest bands is currently being finalised.
▪ Her large supporting cast never really comes to life, and she allows too many strangely unfocused interruptions to her narrative flow.
▪ The supporting cast, especially Danny Glover and Gregory Hines, are also superb.
talented
▪ The musical numbers were excellently performed by an extremely talented cast.
▪ However, funny things do happen on the peripheries of the lame story, particularly from the talented supporting cast.
■ NOUN
ensemble
▪ Despite some good acting from the ensemble cast, the characters slip into the stereotypes needed to establish the political debate.
▪ Big Apple is a classic crime drama with an ensemble cast.
iron
▪ The system, he used to say, was like cast iron, rather than steel.
▪ Start with a five-hundred pound piece of cast iron sitting on the floor.
▪ At worst... well, you have to remember the hammer had a cast iron head weighing several pounds.
▪ Engine parts were made from cast iron.
▪ Two tons of cast iron or more.
▪ Bea heard the cast iron bell fastened to the front door and went to see who it was.
▪ It looked like a cast iron person whose head had been cut off.
▪ The big cast iron range had been picked up and carried out and set down there by eight men.
plaster
▪ Non-playing colleagues rushed him to the local casualty department, where a large plaster cast was fixed on to the injured area.
▪ One medium even claimed to have made a plaster cast of a pair of ectoplasmic hands before they dissolved.
■ VERB
head
▪ Mike Myers heads the cast of this spy spoof.
▪ Meeker, Maxine Cooper and Gaby Rodgers head the cast.
include
▪ An all-star cast includes Orson Welles and George Sanders.
join
▪ We went on the air in October 1986 and Kylie joined the cast about four months into the series.
▪ Every day on stage at Cinderella Castle, returning visitors join a cast of 75 characters and entertainers in a musical revue.
▪ They will soon be working again, when Whoopi joins the cast of Cheers.
▪ Cameron Diaz has joined the cast as a woman stalking Cruise.
support
▪ He is supported by a wonderful cast which graces a movie that deserves the label of epic.
▪ Both Sheffield and Thomas enjoy stronger Triple Crown chances this season because of improvements in their supporting cast.
▪ He benefits, too, from an outstanding supporting cast.
▪ The rest of the supporting cast ranges from adequate to uncomfortable.
▪ In this he is supported by a flawless cast.
▪ However, funny things do happen on the peripheries of the lame story, particularly from the talented supporting cast.
▪ The series started off a few years ago with a different name and a different supporting cast.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be written/set/cast in tablets of stone
cast/spread your net wide
▪ Furse spread his net wide, but it did not sink deep.
▪ I cast my net wide enough to find parents who vary from house cleaner to fashion designer to electrician to corporate manager.
▪ It was argued in Chapter 2 that the criminal law ought to spread its net wider where the potential harm is greater.
▪ Later that afternoon the police, who had been diligently searching certain caravans on Turpin's Field, spread their net wider.
▪ We cast our net wider and in a different direction.
cast/throw pearls before swine
draw/cast lots
▪ It is a curious turn around from the days when bondholders pleased to be bought out and were driving to drawing lots!
▪ She took it thoughtfully like some one choosing a straw when drawing lots.
▪ The players alternate between the white and black pieces and draw lots to determine who plays white in today's first game.
▪ Then we drew lots to decide the order in which we should improvise, night by night.
▪ They also took turns administering the city-state, drawing lots to settle who would take on which job.
▪ They drew lots to decide which should first seize his lady, and fortune favored Ephialtes.
▪ Was it to be done by casting lots?
run/cast your eye over sth
▪ A note from Mellowes instructed me to cast my eye over the draft, pronto, for inaccuracies.
▪ Above him Cornelius ran his eye over a box of ancient cane carpet beaters.
▪ And of course Prince also casts his eye over rock too.
▪ He also casts his eye over the proposed law changes.
▪ I cast my eye over the front page of the Telegraph while Anne poured the coffee.
▪ The customs officers run their eyes over us as if we weren't there.
▪ They've even invited Michael Heseltine, care of Spitting Image, to cast his eyes over the exhibition.
the die is cast
throw in/cast your lot with sb/sth
▪ All you have to do is throw in your lot with me.
▪ At the next meeting of the Unionist Cabinet Ministers Boscawen threw in his lot with me.
▪ Desperate to win in the third most conservative state, Bush threw in his lot with the religious right.
▪ I suppose we are right to throw in our lot with them.
▪ Like Dudley Williams, Jamison threw in her lot with Alvin early on, at the start of her career.
▪ She threw in her lot with the Jowles.
▪ The Dance caught on everywhere, and eventually Sitting Bull himself threw in his lot with the shakers.
throw/cast caution to the winds
▪ Anything less truly would be throwing caution to the winds.
▪ My friends and their little daughter went splashing blithely in so I threw caution to the winds and followed.
▪ The two of us threw caution to the winds and raced to the rescue.
throw/shed/cast light on sth
▪ Newly found Aztec artifacts may shed some light on their mysterious culture.
▪ A fretful wind was not enough to open them and shed light on the ruptured earth in which they lay.
▪ An analysis of the results should shed light on the workings of the Northern Ireland labour market.
▪ Geographical comparison of patterns of lawbreaking sometimes throws light on more general differences in social and economic conditions.
▪ He uses relativity to throw light on time and eternity, and indeterminacy to comment on free will.
▪ In addition, the research is expected to shed light on the social consequences of cities' changing economic roles.
▪ Owing to the small sample size, the results can only be expected to shed light on the trends.
▪ Therefore they shed light on the comparative institutional questions with which we are concerned.
▪ This may shed light on Soviet views of such zones.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Films like 'Ben Hur' were made with a cast of thousands.
▪ Mandy has to have her arm in a cast for six weeks.
▪ McIntosh's work consists of plaster casts of the artist's own face.
▪ The cast includes Bruce Willis and Melanie Griffith.
▪ The entire cast of the play deserves praise for this performance.
▪ The granite columns give a pinkish cast to the base of the building.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And the cast is fairly strong.
▪ Combined with the near-sleepwalking tendencies of the cast, this rendering offered few hair-raising moments on the vocal Richter scale.
▪ Given a great script and cast, Steven Soderbergh is unsurpassed as a storyteller.
▪ The recipes come from an all-star cast of contributors, each a specialist in his or her own right.
▪ Why don't you have a cast?
Wikipedia

CAST

CAST may refer to:

Cast (Mexican band)

Cast is a rock band from Mexico. Formed in the 1970s, they specialize in progressive rock, similar in style to early Genesis. Their music focuses strongly on keyboards, guitars and vocals. The band host an annual progressive rock festival called Baja Prog in Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico, which features bands from around the world.

Cast (archery)

A bow's cast is the distance it can shoot an arrow in archery.

Cast (gymnastics)

A cast is a basic skill on uneven bars in artistic gymnastics. From the front hang, a gymnast pikes (allowing the knee to touch the bar) and slides upwards to a handstand. Some gymnasts may perform the move with straddled legs. It is an "A" move in the Code of Points.

CAST (Center of Advanced Systems & Technologies)

The Center of Advanced Systems and Technologies (CAST) was established in 2005. Known as one of the largest and the most dynamic engineering / research centers in Iran, the mission of CAST is to develop relations with industries and research centers in order to solve industrial challenges by bringing together researchers, experts, consultants and elite students. This mission has guided CAST in its programs of basic and applied research projects. CAST concentrates on product based methods and its direct support of college of Engineering, University of Tehran. CAST’s portfolios in various fields of expertise include smaller scope services as well as large projects.

Cast (band)

Cast are an English rock band from Liverpool, formed in 1992 by John Power (vocals, guitar) and Peter Wilkinson (backing vocals, bass) after Power left The La's and Wilkinson's former band Shack had split. Following early line-ups with different guitarists and drummers, Liam "Skin" Tyson (guitar) and Keith O'Neill (drums) joined Cast in 1993.

Emerging from the Britpop movement of the mid-1990s, Cast signed to Polydor Records and their debut album All Change (1995) became the highest selling debut album for the label. Further commercial success continued with the albums Mother Nature Calls (1997) and Magic Hour (1999), however a departure in sound on the band's fourth album Beetroot (2001) was met by a poor critical and commercial reaction and led to the band's split two weeks after its release.

The band reformed in November 2010 and released their fifth album Troubled Times in November 2011. Bassist Peter Wilkinson confirmed his departure from the band in March 2015, following his abrupt departure from a previous tour in December 2014.

Noel Gallagher of Oasis described watching the band live as being like a "religious experience" and they were labelled " The Who of the 90's". It has been suggested that the name "Cast" was taken from the final word on The La's eponymous album (the song "Looking Glass" ends with the repeated line "The change is cast"); John Power has since confirmed this to be true, stating that he avoided answering this question for some time.

CAST (company)

CAST is a multinational technology corporation, with headquarters in France, near Paris, and New York City. CAST markets software quality and size (Automated Function Points counting) measurement technology and expertise, and offers software, hosting and consulting services all in support software Analysis and Measurement. The company was founded in 1990 in Paris, France, by Vincent Delaroche.

CAST pioneered the use of code quality metrics in application development SLAs, for which Gartner recently highlighted CAST as an innovative software publisher for its work in Application Services. CAST research and experts are often consulted in development quality and security by medias such as Los Angeles Times, BBC, CNBC, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist. Research CAST's head of product development, Olivier Bonsignour, co-wrote The Economics of Software Quality with Capers Jones, another specialist in software engineering.

CAST leadership team includes Dr Bill Curtis, notable for having led the CMM at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) in the early 1990s and more recently the Consortium for IT Software Quality (CISQ), which was established by industry to implement software quality and size standards.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

cast

Gun \Gun\ (g[u^]n), n. [OE. gonne, gunne; of uncertain origin; cf. Ir., Gael., & LL. gunna, W. gum; possibly (like cannon) fr. L. canna reed, tube; or abbreviated fr. OF. mangonnel, E. mangonel, a machine for hurling stones.]

  1. A weapon which throws or propels a missile to a distance; any firearm or instrument for throwing projectiles, consisting of a tube or barrel closed at one end, in which the projectile is placed, with an explosive charge (such as guncotton or gunpowder) behind, which is ignited by various means. Pistols, rifles, carbines, muskets, and fowling pieces are smaller guns, for hand use, and are called small arms. Larger guns are called cannon, ordnance, fieldpieces, carronades, howitzers, etc. See these terms in the Vocabulary.

    As swift as a pellet out of a gunne When fire is in the powder runne.
    --Chaucer.

    The word gun was in use in England for an engine to cast a thing from a man long before there was any gunpowder found out.
    --Selden.

  2. (Mil.) A piece of heavy ordnance; in a restricted sense, a cannon.

  3. pl. (Naut.) Violent blasts of wind.

    Note: Guns are classified, according to their construction or manner of loading as rifled or smoothbore, breech-loading or muzzle-loading, cast or built-up guns; or according to their use, as field, mountain, prairie, seacoast, and siege guns.

    Armstrong gun, a wrought iron breech-loading cannon named after its English inventor, Sir William Armstrong.

    Big gun or Great gun, a piece of heavy ordnance; hence (Fig.), a person superior in any way; as, bring in the big guns to tackle the problem.

    Gun barrel, the barrel or tube of a gun.

    Gun carriage, the carriage on which a gun is mounted or moved.

    Gun cotton (Chem.), a general name for a series of explosive nitric ethers of cellulose, obtained by steeping cotton in nitric and sulphuric acids. Although there are formed substances containing nitric acid radicals, yet the results exactly resemble ordinary cotton in appearance. It burns without ash, with explosion if confined, but quietly and harmlessly if free and open, and in small quantity. Specifically, the lower nitrates of cellulose which are insoluble in ether and alcohol in distinction from the highest (pyroxylin) which is soluble. See Pyroxylin, and cf. Xyloidin. The gun cottons are used for blasting and somewhat in gunnery: for making celluloid when compounded with camphor; and the soluble variety (pyroxylin) for making collodion. See Celluloid, and Collodion. Gun cotton is frequenty but improperly called nitrocellulose. It is not a nitro compound, but an ester of nitric acid.

    Gun deck. See under Deck.

    Gun fire, the time at which the morning or the evening gun is fired.

    Gun metal, a bronze, ordinarily composed of nine parts of copper and one of tin, used for cannon, etc. The name is also given to certain strong mixtures of cast iron.

    Gun port (Naut.), an opening in a ship through which a cannon's muzzle is run out for firing.

    Gun tackle (Naut.), the blocks and pulleys affixed to the side of a ship, by which a gun carriage is run to and from the gun port.

    Gun tackle purchase (Naut.), a tackle composed of two single blocks and a fall.
    --Totten.

    Krupp gun, a wrought steel breech-loading cannon, named after its German inventor, Herr Krupp.

    Machine gun, a breech-loading gun or a group of such guns, mounted on a carriage or other holder, and having a reservoir containing cartridges which are loaded into the gun or guns and fired in rapid succession. In earlier models, such as the Gatling gun, the cartridges were loaded by machinery operated by turning a crank. In modern versions the loading of cartidges is accomplished by levers operated by the recoil of the explosion driving the bullet, or by the pressure of gas within the barrel. Several hundred shots can be fired in a minute by such weapons, with accurate aim. The Gatling gun, Gardner gun, Hotchkiss gun, and Nordenfelt gun, named for their inventors, and the French mitrailleuse, are machine guns.

    To blow great guns (Naut.), to blow a gale. See Gun, n., 3.

WordNet

cast

adj. (of molten metal or glass) formed by pouring or pressing into a mold

cast

  1. n. the actors in a play [syn: cast of characters, dramatis personae]

  2. container into which liquid is poured to create a given shape when it hardens [syn: mold, mould]

  3. the distinctive form in which a thing is made; "pottery of this cast was found throughout the region" [syn: mold, stamp]

  4. the visual appearance of something or someone; "the delicate cast of his features" [syn: form, shape]

  5. bandage consisting of a firm covering (often made of plaster of Paris) that immobilizes broken bones while they heal [syn: plaster cast, plaster bandage]

  6. object formed by a mold [syn: casting]

  7. the act of throwing dice [syn: roll]

  8. the act of throwing a fishing line out over the water by means of a rod and reel [syn: casting]

  9. a violent throw [syn: hurl]

cast

  1. v. put or send forth; "She threw the flashlight beam into the corner"; "The setting sun threw long shadows"; "cast a spell"; "cast a warm light" [syn: project, contrive, throw]

  2. deposit; "cast a vote"; "cast a ballot"

  3. select to play,sing, or dance a part in a play, movie, musical, opera, or ballet; "He cast a young woman in the role of Desdemona"

  4. throw forcefully [syn: hurl, hurtle]

  5. assign the roles of (a movie or a play) to actors; "Who cast this beautiful movie?"

  6. move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town" [syn: roll, wander, swan, stray, tramp, roam, ramble, rove, range, drift, vagabond]

  7. form by pouring (e.g., wax or hot metal) into a cast or mold; "cast a bronze sculpture" [syn: mold, mould]

  8. get rid of; "he shed his image as a pushy boss"; "shed your clothes" [syn: shed, cast off, shake off, throw, throw off, throw away, drop]

  9. choose at random; "draw a card"; "cast lots" [syn: draw]

  10. formulate in a particular style or language; "I wouldn't put it that way"; "She cast her request in very polite language" [syn: frame, redact, put, couch]

  11. eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth; "After drinking too much, the students vomited"; "He purged continuously"; "The patient regurgitated the food we gave him last night" [syn: vomit, vomit up, purge, sick, cat, be sick, disgorge, regorge, retch, puke, barf, spew, spue, chuck, upchuck, honk, regurgitate, throw up] [ant: keep down]

Wiktionary

cast

n. 1 An act of throwing. 2 Something which has been thrown, dispersed etc. 3 A small mass of earth "thrown off" or excreted by a worm. 4 The collective group of actors performing a play or production together. Contrasted with crew. 5 The casting procedure. 6 An object made in a mould. 7 A supportive and immobilising device used to help mend broken bones. 8 The mould used to make cast objects 9 (context hawking English) The number of hawks (or occasionally other birds) cast off at one time; a pair. 10 A squint. 11 visual appearance. 12 The form of one's thoughts, mind etc. 13 An animal, especially a horse, that is unable to rise without assistance. 14 Animal and insect remains which have been regurgitated by a bird. 15 A group of crabs. vb. 1 (label en heading physical) ''To move, or be moved, away.'' 2 # (label en now somewhat literary) To throw. (from 13thc.) 3 # To throw forward (a fishing line, net etc.) into the se

  1. (from 14thc.) 4 # Specifically, to throw down or aside. (from 15thc.) 5 # (label en of an animal) To throw off (the skin) as a process of growth; to shed the hair or fur of the coat. (from 15thc.) 6 # (label en obsolete except in set phrases) To remove, take off (clothes). (from 14thc.) 7 # (label en nautical) To heave the lead and line in order to ascertain the depth of water. 8 # (label en obsolete) To vomit. 9 # (label en archaic) To throw up, as a mound, or rampart. 10 # (label en archaic) To throw out or emit; to exhale. 11 To direct (one's eyes, gaze etc.). (from 13thc.)

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

cast

c.1200, "to throw, fling, hurl," from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse kasta "to throw" (cognate with Swedish kasta, Danish kaste, North Frisian kastin), of uncertain origin. Meaning "to form in a mold" is late 15c. In the sense of "warp, turn" it replaced Old English weorpan (see warp (v.)), and itself largely has been superseded now by throw, though cast still is used of fishing lines and glances. Meaning "calculate, find by reckoning; chart (a course)" is from c.1300.

cast

mid-13c., "a throw, an act of throwing," from cast (v.). In early use especially of dice, hence figurative uses relating to fortune or fate. Meaning "that which is cast" is from c.1550s. Meaning "dash or shade of color" is from c.1600. The sense of "a throw" carried an idea of "the form the thing takes after it has been thrown," which led to widespread and varied meanings, such as "group of actors in a play" (1630s). OED finds 42 distinct noun meaning and 83 verbal ones, with many sub-definitions. Many of the figurative senses converged in a general meaning "sort, kind, style" (mid-17c.). A cast in the eye (early 14c.) preserves the older verbal sense of "warp, turn."

Usage examples of "cast".

From the summit he was cast down headlong, and dashed in pieces on the pavement, in the presence of innumerable spectators, who filled the forum of Taurus, and admired the accomplishment of an old prediction, which was explained by this singular event.

The acroterion is cast in the reclining form of a pretty young man, hands bound above his head, ankles bound as well, and a gag tied tightly across his mouth.

He must needs weave his phantasy into some quietly melancholy fabric of didactic or allegorical cast, in which his meekly resigned cynicism may display with naive moral appraisal the perfidy of a human race which he cannot cease to cherish and mourn despite his insight into its hypocrisy.

Where we read that, after the casting of lots, the sample lives are exhibited with the casual circumstances attending them and that the choice is made upon vision, in accordance with the individual temperament, we are given to understand that the real determination lies with the Souls, who adapt the allotted conditions to their own particular quality.

Already his visions of her as she would be were creeping into her mind, looking desirable, alluring, and she was having more and more trouble casting them out.

I should have wished to have limited my story to Beaufort and his message, but as the council seemed to be intent upon hearing a full account of my journey, I told in as short and simple speech as I could the various passages which had befallen me--the ambuscado of the smugglers, the cave, the capture of the gauger, the journey in the lugger, the acquaintance with Farmer Brown, my being cast into prison, with the manner of my release and the message wherewith I had been commissioned.

He cast another glace of longing and terror at the amplifier as he passed.

Truth once more, but if you cling to apostasy, then even as he foretold, you will be cast into the Fire, and all other unbelievers with you.

But as soon as they were united at Anagni and Fundi, in a place of security, they cast aside the mask, accused their own falsehood and hypocrisy, excommunicated the apostate and antichrist of Rome, and proceeded to a new election of Robert of Geneva, Clement the Seventh, whom they announced to the nations as the true and rightful vicar of Christ.

How had I not noticed, in the archive, that the region represented on those maps had exactly the brooding, spread-winged shape of my dragon, as if he cast his shadow over it from above?

In a few moments more the fire just at one point became blinding, and in another second the sun emerged, the first arrowy shaft passed into her chamber, the first shadow was cast, and it was day.

There was simply not the time to cast it into rhyme or metre, to take care with assonance and ambiguity.

Then, thanks to me, the needle in the compass took its true direction again, and the ship, blown to the northeast by that frightful hurricane, has just been cast on the coast of Africa, just on this land of Angola which I wished to reach.

And yet these exceptions are either too few in number, or too recent in time, entirely to remove the imputation of ignorance and obscurity which has been so arrogantly cast on the first proselytes of Christianity.

The light had a dull golden cast and a grainy quality, as if mixed in with particles of gloom, and the smell, while it plainly was that of a cleaning agent, did not have the astringency of an industrial cleaner.