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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

cash

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cash box (=for keeping a supply of money in, for example in a shop)
▪ Thieves stole £100 from a cash box at the school.
a cash card (also an ATM card especially AmE) (= one you use to get cash from a machine)
▪ You should report stolen cash cards immediately.
a cash crisis (=a lack of money)
▪ In April the company sold another 30% of its stock to ease its cash crisis.
a cash crop (=grown to be sold rather than used)
▪ Cotton is grown as a cash crop in the savannah.
a cash payment (=a payment in cash)
▪ He provided pills to athletes in return for cash payments.
a cash prize
▪ There's a $5,000 cash prize for the winner.
a cash/ATM machine (=for giving you money from your bank account)
▪ I need to stop at a cash machine.
be short of money/cash/funds
▪ Our libraries are short of funds.
cash a cheque (=exchange a cheque for the amount of money it is worth)
▪ The company had cashed the cheque but not sent the goods.
cash advance
▪ It seems so easy to get a $100 cash advance every few days at a local ATM machine.
cash and carry
cash bar
cash box
cash card
cash cow
cash crop
cash desk
cash discount
cash dispenser
cash flow problems
▪ The builder is unable to pay due to cash flow problems.
cash flow
▪ We expect a rise in both our production and our cash flow.
cash incentives
▪ The scheme gives farmers cash incentives to manage the countryside for wildlife.
cash machine
cash payouts
▪ Some of the victims have been offered massive cash payouts.
cash register
cash/budget/financial etc crunch
▪ Cost cutting had enabled the organization to survive a previous cash crunch.
electronic cash
hard cash
hard-earned money/cash etc
▪ Don’t be too quick to part with your hard-earned cash.
pay (in) cash
▪ You have to pay in cash for the tickets.
petty cash
spot cash
▪ They won’t take credit; they want spot cash.
surplus cash/funds/revenues
▪ Surplus cash can be invested.
the monetary/cash value (=the value of something in money)
▪ They made an attempt to assess the cash value of the contract.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
electronic
▪ The authorities reacted by ruling that tamper-proof electronic cash registers must be used.
▪ So she places her smart card containing electronic cash provided as part of a bank service into the smart-card reader.
▪ Mostly, they hand over a credit-card number, but some transactions already use electronic cash.
▪ Of course, electronic cash does not have to be held on a Card.
▪ This contains an invisible watermark ... detectable only to electronic tills and cash dispensers.The company says it should be impossible to copy.
extra
▪ District councillors are under no illusion that the extra cash they are providing is enough to solve the problem entirely.
▪ Some of the extra cash was needed to remove asbestos from the building.
▪ Your bright idea could even earn you some extra cash.
▪ When I had a little extra cash I decided I would buy new speakers.
▪ Mr Patten hinted that extra cash for public sector housebuilding will go where shortages are greatest.
▪ The extra cash would fund research related to the new generation of satellites planned for later in the 1980s.
▪ Unfortunately most of the extra cash grabbed was swallowed up by bad debts.
▪ Trinity say that no extra cash is available and that Jackson must honour his existing contract.
future
▪ Economic value - as this is based on future cash flows from the asset the economic value is likely to be reduced.
▪ In other words, it is the rate that equates future net cash flows to the initial investment outlay.
▪ Relevant costs and revenues are defined as future cash flows that will be changed by the decision under review.
▪ The basic answer lies in the guesses about future cash flow.
▪ It is important when answering questions on relevant costing to identify all future cash flows affected by a particular decision.
▪ A valuer who knows what he is doing will value on the basis of one key criterion: available future cash flow.
▪ Wednesday brings surprise news affecting future cash decisions.
▪ Whether a company acquires an asset through loan or leasing, it is committed to making future cash payments.
hard
▪ Intellectuals were called on to transform their knowledge into hard cash.
▪ Luckily, the chatter of cold hard cash later persuaded the state to sell the name to the highest bidder.
▪ John's role was to get together as much hard cash as possible.
▪ Two Model Village awards will not suffice our merchants for cold, hard cash.
▪ Chamois and crystal hunters began to convert their mountain skills into hard cash by becoming mountain guides for the more adventurous tourists.
▪ The social types turned out en masse to cheer on their friends and to put a little hard cash on the line.
▪ For the City has not been prepared to back his business with hard cash.
▪ There was very little hard cash.
large
▪ A handful are sitting on large cash surpluses.
▪ Disney, which has a large cash hoard, also might be interested, sources said.
▪ You see, often I carry large sums of cash and need protection.
▪ Medal winners will receive large cash prizes from the government and be treated like royalty.
▪ In order to avoid large cash payments to the public on a particular date, the Bank purchases government securities before they mature.
▪ The homesteader needed a small filing fee, and a much larger amount of cash to survive until the farm got going.
▪ He said the recession could even encourage MBOs as large companies raise cash by disposing of subsidiary organisations.
▪ As airlines grew, their large cash flows were used to justify huge borrowings for takeovers and expansion.
net
▪ In other words, it is the rate that equates future net cash flows to the initial investment outlay.
▪ Total inflows minus total outflows results in the predicted net cash gain or loss during the month.
▪ The Wetherby, Yorkshire company now has £600,000 net cash.
▪ National Medical generated $ 193 million in net cash from operations in 1994.
▪ It was easily affordable: the rights issue last year strengthened the finances and left year end net cash of £77m.
▪ After starting last year with net debt of £6.3m, it now has net cash of almost £4m.
▪ The problem with a high-tech start-up is that you have a net cash outflow.
▪ Despite the costs of launching Carlton Television, the company still has a strong balance sheet, with net cash of £50.3m.
petty
▪ We now have to buy it from our petty cash.
▪ This is not a buck here or a buck there in the petty cash till.
▪ Completion and interpretation of petty cash transactions. 3 Materials and Stationery Use and control; methods of economy.
▪ They are entered in the petty cash book.
▪ These items are usually paid for out of the petty cash.
▪ If you work in retailing, you may be asked to look after the petty cash.
▪ Borrowing money from colleagues at work, petty cash, or from neighbours is a fast way of making yourself unpopular.
ready
▪ Both have so far proved effective, which shows that ready cash is more versatile than credit cards and cheque books.
▪ Phagu clipped the goats and wound the hair into skeins which he would sell for ready cash in town.
▪ I pass up a roadside rest area, a happy hunting ground for new cars and ready cash.
▪ There is not so much ready cash in my treasury.
▪ With ready cash in your bank account you can spend the money as you want.
▪ He made over his share in Leopold's estate to Nannerl in return for 1,000 gulden of ready cash, which he desperately needed.
short
▪ So whether you're visiting Perth or Penzance, you need never go short of cash.
▪ Before Diller came in, they were short on cash and needed to get a product out fast.
▪ In August 1910 the Boro were short of cash.
▪ If your company is short on cash, it becomes very tempting not to remit these taxes.
▪ They can be sold quickly on the Stock Exchange if banks are short of cash.
▪ They're not short of cash.
▪ Alternatively, if those banks subject to statutory cash requirements were short of cash, they could attract cash away from the uncontrolled institutions.
▪ Yet, because of its magpie genesis, the new Look was vulnerable to the sharp-eyed but short of cash.
spare
▪ In fact all the games mentioned were inexpensive, they had to be, few people had spare cash for inessentials.
▪ We had three children in quick succession, and no spare cash.
▪ Any spare cash he preferred to donate to more worthy causes.
▪ I know people don't have any spare cash at the moment so thought this would be a good alternative.
▪ If I ask for extra to buy baby clothes, he says he doesn't have the spare cash.
▪ Past boy friends who could use a bit of spare cash.
▪ So, whenever you have some spare cash to hand, pay it into Premier Savings and watch it grow.
surplus
▪ Financing decisions Fixed asset investment can be funded from several sources: equity, surplus cash, loans or leasing.
▪ It would suit them better to use their surplus cash to aid starving children in other countries.
▪ Gradually coffee came to replace maize as the main agricultural produce of the community and foodstuffs were bought with surplus cash.
■ NOUN
alternative
▪ No cash alternative to the prize will be offered. 10.
▪ Granada offered an increased cash alternative of 362p.
▪ The draw to this raffle, which includes cash alternatives, is due to take place at the Dairy Event in September.
▪ We regret that if, for any reason, the winners can not accept their prizes there can be no cash alternative.
▪ No cash alternatives will be given. 5 Only one entry per person.
▪ No cash alternative is available. 6.
▪ There is no cash alternative to the prizes. 2.
box
▪ Possibly somewhere between 1901 and the present, Bobsworth had been caught with his hand in the cash box.
▪ They were arrested three weeks later in Liverpool when they were again seen to remove the cash box from a kiosk.
▪ Clinic raided: Burglars stole about £100 from a cash box at the clinic in Zetland Street, Northallerton.
▪ Responsibility for the photocopier cash box. 9.
▪ Jewellery has always been the Arabian woman's cash box.
▪ The imprest would also be £3.77, so that the petty cash box contains £20 for the next day.
▪ Phone cash goes Thieves broke into a cash box in a telephone kiosk at Braintree railway station and stole about £300.
card
▪ Imagine that a child has a cash card.
▪ The account offers a cash card and 1 per cent bonus for the first six months.
▪ Some cash cards have special links with international networks and make no charge for obtaining cash.
▪ Hence the helpful and revealing insights of the staff into his cash card habits.
crop
▪ Potatoes are the only cash crop though even some of these are used for fodder.
▪ Wine formed the most important cash crop, while cereal production generally took the form of subsistence farming.
▪ Poppies are a major cash crop.
▪ Thus it is both a cash crop and a fodder crop.
▪ Why don't producer nations simply switch crops and either become more self-sufficient in food, or produce a different cash crop?
▪ Specific cash crops were profitable only in certain districts.
▪ Unemployment soared, and many small producers of cash crops went bankrupt.
▪ Coffee was introduced into the central highlands in the 1840s, and quickly became the most important cash crop.
dispenser
▪ Been to the cash dispenser, got a statement, then withdrawn everything except four pounds ninety-five to keep the account open.
▪ She gave a similar answer when he asked her to open the automatic cash dispenser.
▪ Be very careful when you withdraw money from street cash dispensers.
▪ And at Barclays cash dispensers you can check your balance and order a statement.
▪ Their victims include a woman who is withdrawing money from a cash dispenser, and a gunsmith.
▪ It would cost around four million pounds to convert every cash dispenser in the country to being voice activated.
▪ Many of the building societies have also linked together so that their cash dispenser machines are networked.
▪ Jon Newsome has big trouble with his cash dispenser card - he regularly puts it in the wrong way round.
flow
▪ Shaftesbury Homes' report was praised for a good treasurer's report, accounts and cash flow statement.
▪ To improve cash flow, Kmart eliminated its dividend, cut expenses and boosted earnings.
▪ What effect would not giving credit have on your sales, your cash flow and your profits? 4.
▪ In terms of cash flow during the childrearing years, many families and most single parents really are poor.
▪ For the bold punter, a bid above 100p is unlikely without some signs of positive management action to stabilise cash flow.
▪ But Duran's failure to control his cash flow had him ducking under the ropes again 18 months later.
▪ This delayed cash flow will alter the net present value of an arbitrage transaction which involves buying shares.
▪ Lack of stock control Goods which can not be quickly used or sold but put strains on cash flow.
flows
▪ In other words, it is the rate that equates future net cash flows to the initial investment outlay.
▪ A little care is needed to calculate the cash flows for column 5.
▪ It is important when answering questions on relevant costing to identify all future cash flows affected by a particular decision.
▪ One man's new tricks to manage cash flows and control risk are another's source of financial enslavement and greater risk-taking.
▪ It recognises that money has a time value by discounting future cash flows at an appropriate discount rate.
▪ The money yield requires forecasts of all future cash flows from the bond.
▪ The result may then be used to discount the unadjusted cash flows.
▪ This is mistaken because the charge to revenue accounts does not reflect cash flows, only loan redemptions.
injection
▪ Manchester-based Eyeline faces closure unless it gets an urgent 12,000 cash injection.
▪ The club needs an immediate cash injection of £8,000.
▪ Donations are the key, although Crisis makes a cash injection of around £50,000.
▪ Thirteen landowners from Kesgrave are planning High Court action against the authority after giving a cash injection of £1.9 million.
▪ West Berlin was always a social security case, getting massive cash injections from Bonn.
▪ Mr Gleeson said it would be unfair to suggest the cash injection had something to do with the forthcoming General Election.
▪ It also announced that it would take no new orders as it hunts around for a cash injection to keep it solvent.
▪ The government can also offset the £ 100 cash injection by future taxation or borrowing and thus prevent deposit creation.
limit
▪ The discipline of cash limits was repeatedly disregarded, with political factors often intervening to soften the government's monetarist convictions.
▪ In general these cash limits were tighter than the losses industries had previously been making.
▪ In other words, cash limits were not expected to be adjusted during the subsequent year to take account of inflation.
▪ Central government generally has cash limits imposed on clearly defined blocks of expenditure.
▪ A cash limit is also applied to nationalized industries to restrict their ability to borrow from sources other than the government.
▪ We will reform the Social Fund, removing its cash limit and converting most loans into grants.
▪ From 1982 the two separate sets of targets used by the Labour government - volume and cash limit - were abolished.
machine
▪ The weekly-paid Greater Glasgow Health Board employees first discovered the bank's mistake when they tried to withdraw money from cash machines.
▪ Then whenever you want to make your payment, just key in the amount at any Birmingham Midshires cash machine.
▪ Then, one of them went to a cash machine to try to get money from her account.
▪ Even the bank's cash machine may get a face, or many, depending on the customer.
▪ Only £700m was withdrawn from cash machines in 1979 - it is now about £50 billion a year.
▪ Half way through the next working day, Rainbow pauses at a cash machine.
▪ Exchanges done through cash machines which can not issue receipts are exempt from this provision.
▪ There were no cheque accounts, no building society cash machines and the 90-day account and Tessas were still some years off.
payment
▪ These range from the handling of simple, yet administratively inconvenient, cash payments to sophisticated electronic payment schemes.
▪ The rules cover not only cash payments but also the settlement of household bills.
▪ In a very real sense, payment of dividends represents a choice between future capital gains and current cash payments.
▪ Some types of life assurance provide a cash payment on a director's retirement to buyout his or her shareholding.
▪ It includes all cash payments by the government, and all cash receipts.
▪ The matter was soon settled by a cash payment.
▪ They received an average cash payment of £12,468.
register
▪ The authorities reacted by ruling that tamper-proof electronic cash registers must be used.
▪ By the time I got my chance at the cash register, my white friends had been promoted to management.
▪ So methods have been developed to dissuade you from wandering off to somebody else's cash register.
▪ Exasperated customers were elbowing through the aisles in search of the cash registers.
▪ National chromed cash register, £220.
▪ If anything, he said, what they heard was that cash register.
▪ An attractive girl with a cheerful smile and laughing eyes was sitting at the cash register by the doorway.
▪ And do you really need three adding machines and two cash registers?
■ VERB
carry
▪ Sadly, she never carries cash, so any hope of seeing her choose something unusually revolting for daughter-in-law Fergie soon faded.
▪ When police arrested Nestor Padron on suspicion of skimming meter receipts, he was carrying $ 850 in cash, Maher said.
▪ You see, often I carry large sums of cash and need protection.
▪ To avoid loss, carry the cash in a hidden neck or waist pouch.
▪ Senior officers say more and more criminals are prepared to carry firearms in cash raids.
▪ The main perceived benefit was the lack of need to carry cash or cheques.
▪ Funny how the rich don't carry cash.
▪ The Wolf prize also carries cash award of £60,000.
hand
▪ Steven White, 21, terrified staff at five banks into handing over cash, Southwark Crown Court heard.
▪ Just hand him the cash and he will make his own choices.
▪ A leading councillor is concerned about the way the Government is handing out community care cash.
▪ If they guessed on which side it fell, he handed over £100 cash.
▪ The 69-year-old man, from Elsdon Street, handed over the cash on odd occasions over the past year.
▪ In each of the robberies the raider handed over notes demanding cash and claiming he had a gun.
keep
▪ We have also noted that all debits and credits are not maintained separately because authorities tend to keep only one cash book.
▪ The open top rested on the floor, a good place to keep cash, I thought.
▪ She kept her cash in a shoebox under the bed.
▪ But maybe you should keep all the cash for yourself.
▪ Some folk may be tempted to stay on the sidelines and keep cash in the bank or building society.
▪ Still, demand for most junk bonds is still strong, because investors keep putting cash into high yield funds.
▪ Like many old people he ignored advice not to keep cash in his home.
need
▪ But to buy some more you need more cash.
▪ They say their business makes sense for winners who need immediate cash to pay off debts, start up businesses or invest.
▪ All banks need to maintain a cash ratio large enough to meet the cash requirements of their depositors.
▪ This creates room for new borrowing under the debt limit and allows the Treasury to sell fresh securities and raise needed cash.
▪ Voice over Maybe not baggage, but you will need a lot of cash.
▪ The second liquidity need is the same liquidity need that individuals have-firms need to maintain some cash balances to meet unexpected emergencies.
▪ Corporate diversification may often be due to a sense of needing to use up cash surpluses, rather than risk-spreading.
▪ But I needed cash quickly to set up in that line of business.
offer
▪ They can not compete with dealers who offer a warranty, cash discount, credit, part-ex and back-up etc.
▪ Homeless children scrounge for spare change, and newspapers carry ads from people offering their kidneys for cash.
▪ Make employers offer workers a cash alternative to free parking.
▪ Rather than offer the global working class cash for labour, it offers cash for food, water and air.
▪ Nearly all large commercial banks now offer highly sophisticated cash management systems for their commercial accounts.
▪ The deal enables it to offer creditors a 25% cash dividend to keep the company in business.
▪ He probably also knew that Banister had offered to channel cash from the New Orleans rackets to maintain the team of shooters.
pay
▪ And he sometimes paid them in cash, to speed things up.
▪ Workers were paid in cash, and no receipts were required.
▪ You can pay by cash or by cheque.
▪ It also shows why most aggressive, self-confident executives would rather be paid in stock than cash.
▪ If you pay by cash you will normally obtain a receipt as proof of payment.
▪ Manufacturers, through brokers, pay incentives, either cash or products, to stock particular foods or to promote them.
▪ Embarrassed, she paid by cash and wrestled with her conscience all the way home.
▪ That will be paid off by using cash flow, or replacing it with medium or long-term bonds.
provide
▪ Life assurance can provide the cash you need - at the right time.
▪ Some types of life assurance provide a cash payment on a director's retirement to buyout his or her shareholding.
▪ The legislation would also provide cash benefits to states that reduce births by unmarried women.
▪ For clubs in decent pitches though, offices or leisure complexes on part of their land can also provide cash.
▪ Guy Banister saw to it that exile leaders knew who was providing cash for arms and ammunition.
▪ And for no better reason than this Dickensian Government will not provide the cash.
▪ This would counter rural-urban migration as well as improve living standards and provide a cash income.
raise
▪ Their traditional ways of raising cash are too expensive: big firms can save millions by borrowing in New York or London.
▪ By eliminating this technique to raise cash without realizing a capital gain, the Treasury proposes to force investors to pay up.
▪ No charity can raise that sort of cash single-handed.
▪ There also is talk that the private company might go public, selling stock to raise more cash for growth.
▪ Foremost among the fun activities which raised the cash were sponsored stay-awakes and lock-ins by the Year 11 and Year 7 youngsters.
▪ Once you become an entrepreneur, it will be much harder to raise this kind of cash.
▪ The youngsters took part in an arduous sponsored swim to raise the cash.
▪ The Contrafund, for example, raised its cash and bond weighting to 15. 4 percent from 9. 2 percent.
receive
▪ She also received a cash lump sum from her Personal Accident Policy.
▪ Medal winners will receive large cash prizes from the government and be treated like royalty.
▪ They received an average cash payment of £12,468.
▪ The institutions, in return, receive cash collateral from the brokers.
▪ She had received £70 in cash, repaid £35, and still owed £101 15s.
▪ They must be duly authorised and signed by the person receiving the cash.
▪ Despite their wealth, each receives a hefty cash handout from the Civil List.
spend
▪ The second reason is the fact that most people have a limited budget and are already spending all their cash on games.
▪ Ownership has to make a commitment to spend that cash.
▪ So he spent the cash on his home and family.
▪ Why is it so easy to spend your cash when it can take so long to earn?
▪ There's no denying it, if you don't spend a lot of cash, you go down.
▪ All ludicrous examples of local councils wantonly spending excess cash are gratefully received.
▪ But as Ken Goodwin reports, nothing much has changed when it comes to how children choose to spend their cash.
strap
▪ The slump leaves the Government strapped for cash forcing National Savings to compete aggressively for money.
use
▪ The original Norfolk rotation was used to grow cash crops on strong land, yet never were two successive cash crops taken.
▪ Banks are generating record profits and using excess cash to buy out competitors and repurchase their own shares.
▪ The Tory party used cash and back channels and foreign donations to influence elections and change laws.
▪ Futures are highly liquid and can be used to raise cash quickly.
▪ It would suit them better to use their surplus cash to aid starving children in other countries.
▪ I intend to use the cash to pick up some refreshments for the men.
▪ Mostly, they hand over a credit-card number, but some transactions already use electronic cash.
▪ Xerox is expected to use the cash to pay down debt from the insurance unit.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be pressed for time/cash etc
be rolling in money/dough/cash/it
▪ Mel Levine is rolling in dough.
▪ After all, this man was a tycoon as well as a doctor; he must be rolling in money.
▪ Because the people who are rolling in it certainly are.
cold (hard) cash
▪ After a year, the igloo-shaped stadium has cost the citizens $ 20 million in very cold cash.
▪ Luckily, the chatter of cold hard cash later persuaded the state to sell the name to the highest bidder.
▪ No cold cash in the Nugent icebox, however, so I moved on.
▪ The other driving force is cold cash and order books.
ready money/cash
▪ He was only willing to sell it for ready cash.
▪ Any peasant short of ready money now had to resort to a usurer.
▪ Both have so far proved effective, which shows that ready cash is more versatile than credit cards and cheque books.
▪ I pass up a roadside rest area, a happy hunting ground for new cars and ready cash.
▪ Less need for travelers' checks at many destinations because of the growing availability of automated teller machines worldwide dispensing ready cash.
▪ Phagu clipped the goats and wound the hair into skeins which he would sell for ready cash in town.
▪ There is not so much ready cash in my treasury.
▪ With ready cash in your bank account you can spend the money as you want.
strapped (for cash)
▪ Could you lend me $10? I'm a little strapped for cash.
▪ If only all those years ago she had not been so strapped by convention.
▪ If she strapped them down to make herself look boyish they just stuck out a foot farther down, and ached.
▪ If they are afraid of rats, an iron cage of rats strapped over the chest or face is used.
▪ Still strapped in the chair in the corner.
▪ The cameras beamed live views of shuttle crew members as they were strapped by colleagues into the cramped cockpit.
▪ The.303 and the shotgun were in a waterproof bag strapped to the side of the pack.
▪ This was deep reading at full tilt, a sprint with lead survival gear strapped to your back.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Are you paying cash for these items?
▪ By age 15, Sean was stealing cash from his mother to buy drugs.
▪ Do you have a couple of dollars in cash?
▪ I'll write you a cheque, and you can pay me back in cash later.
▪ I don't have much cash at the moment. Could I pay you next week?
▪ I heard she paid cash for her house back in the sixties.
▪ She earns extra cash by working as a waitress.
▪ The Health Authority says that it simply has no extra cash from its £136 million budget.
▪ Thieves stole a large amount of cash, and jewellery worth £50,000.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Debt would be sold for cash at a discount or converted into 17- to 25-year bonds.
▪ Discreet chorales endorse the beadle, who gathers cash on a wooden plate.
▪ Horsham has the right to deliver either the shares or their cash equivalent.
▪ If she didn't come I'd make arrangements for her to have set amounts of cash from time to time.
▪ John's role was to get together as much hard cash as possible.
▪ Once you become an entrepreneur, it will be much harder to raise this kind of cash.
▪ Swensson saved up and bought a new car -- a 1925 Ford -- for $ 485 cash.
▪ The state had to borrow $ 7 billion last July to keep from running out of cash.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
in
▪ And clubs can't help cashing in - by constantly changing the colour and style of their football strips.
▪ Shuchuk took a beautiful set-up pass from Kevin Todd in front of the net and cashed in at 17: 39.
▪ People were seen queuing overnight outside travel agents to be able to cash in on a £20 holiday for four!
▪ Marketing expert Mark Roesler testified Thursday that Simpson could cash in on his name.
▪ He was simply cashing in before Bill Clinton takes office.
▪ The Ottawa-based maker of computerized communications equipment cashed in on optimistic prospects for the Internet, the global computer network.
▪ Worst still, she was planning to cash in on Ivor's insurance policies.
▪ Some of the publishers cashing in on the lucrative confession craze profess to being disturbed by it.
out
▪ Excel always treats negative money as cash out and positive money as cash in.
▪ One possibility is simple: New money coming in would pay for the shares of those cashing out.
■ NOUN
check
▪ The fact that he would never be able to cash the check did not trouble him.
▪ The Casas de Cambio pockets a 1 percent spiff from cashing pay checks after hours.
▪ People would open a checking account, so they could cash a check at the market.
cheque
▪ At Barclays Bank he paid in the cheque from James Salperton and cashed a cheque of his own.
▪ The money will come, I will deposit it, Fakhru will cash his cheque.
▪ A: I need to cash a cheque.
▪ Lloyds Bank cashed a Gieves cheque for £27,000, the crew were paid and a crisis averted.
▪ When he cashes the cheque, he has stolen the amount stated on the face of the cheque.
chip
▪ His attitude-as well as those of other old partners-toward the firm changed once he had cashed in his chips.
▪ Maybe they should cash in chips now.
million
▪ The Company's financial position at March 31 includes $ 834.9 million of cash, cash equivalents and securities available for sale.
▪ Metropolitan Life owns about 96 % of the portfolio, and will receive $ 323 million in cash for its interest.
▪ That means First Interstate managers could reap about $ 300 million in pretax profits cashing in their options.
option
▪ This wealth will continue to fluctuate with the share price until he decides to cash in the options.
▪ That means First Interstate managers could reap about $ 300 million in pretax profits cashing in their options.
■ VERB
give
▪ He also criticised with profits policy charges and the poor returns given to individuals who cash in their policies early.
▪ So give the kids cash for a pizza delivery, and let the grown-ups enjoy a relaxing meal in the shade.
▪ A man armed with a pocketknife ordered a male pedestrian to give him cash.
hope
▪ Fidelity Investments is hoping to cash in on some of this traffic by offering three new unit investment trusts.
pay
▪ No interest paid if cashed in within first year.
▪ A number of banks and building societies are paying generous rates to cash Isa customers.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
cold (hard) cash
▪ After a year, the igloo-shaped stadium has cost the citizens $ 20 million in very cold cash.
▪ Luckily, the chatter of cold hard cash later persuaded the state to sell the name to the highest bidder.
▪ No cold cash in the Nugent icebox, however, so I moved on.
▪ The other driving force is cold cash and order books.
ready money/cash
▪ He was only willing to sell it for ready cash.
▪ Any peasant short of ready money now had to resort to a usurer.
▪ Both have so far proved effective, which shows that ready cash is more versatile than credit cards and cheque books.
▪ I pass up a roadside rest area, a happy hunting ground for new cars and ready cash.
▪ Less need for travelers' checks at many destinations because of the growing availability of automated teller machines worldwide dispensing ready cash.
▪ Phagu clipped the goats and wound the hair into skeins which he would sell for ready cash in town.
▪ There is not so much ready cash in my treasury.
▪ With ready cash in your bank account you can spend the money as you want.
strapped (for cash)
▪ Could you lend me $10? I'm a little strapped for cash.
▪ If only all those years ago she had not been so strapped by convention.
▪ If she strapped them down to make herself look boyish they just stuck out a foot farther down, and ached.
▪ If they are afraid of rats, an iron cage of rats strapped over the chest or face is used.
▪ Still strapped in the chair in the corner.
▪ The cameras beamed live views of shuttle crew members as they were strapped by colleagues into the cramped cockpit.
▪ The.303 and the shotgun were in a waterproof bag strapped to the side of the pack.
▪ This was deep reading at full tilt, a sprint with lead survival gear strapped to your back.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And all the departing officers would be allowed to immediately cash in any of their unvested options and restricted stock.
▪ No interest paid if cashed in within first year.
▪ Then she sees Trotter's purse lying open with the money she has cashed from the county welfare.
Wikipedia

Cash

Cash refers to money in the physical form of currency, such as banknotes and coins.

In bookkeeping and finance, cash refers to current assets comprising currency or currency equivalents that can be accessed immediately or near-immediately (as in the case of money market accounts). Cash is seen either as a reserve for payments, in case of a structural or incidental negative cash flow or as a way to avoid a downturn on financial markets.

Cash (The Young Ones)

"Cash" was the eighth episode of British sitcom The Young Ones. It was written by Ben Elton, Rik Mayall and Lise Mayer, and directed by Paul Jackson. It was first aired on BBC Two on 15 May 1984.

Cash (2007 film)

Cash is a 2007 Bollywood action thriller film directed by Anubhav Sinha. It features Ajay Devgn, Suniel Shetty, Esha Deol, Ritesh Deshmukh, Zayed Khan, Shamita Shetty and Dia Mirza in the lead roles. The film was released on 3 August 2007.

Cash (unit)

Cash or li is a traditional Chinese unit of weight.

The terms "cash" or "le" were documented to have been used by British explorers in the 1830s when trading in Qing territories of China.

Under the Hong Kong statute of the Weights and Mesaures Ordinance, 1 cash is about . Currently, it is candareen or catty, namely .

Cash (Chinese coin)

Cash was a type of coin of China and East Asia from the 2nd century BC until the 20th century AD.

Cash (2008 film)

Cash (sometimes stylised as Ca$h) is a French crime caper film from 2008, directed by Eric Besnard and starring Jean Dujardin, Jean Reno, Valeria Golino and Ciarán Hinds.

Cash (disambiguation)

Cash refers to money in the physical form of currency, such as banknotes and coins.

Cash may also refer to:

  • Cash (Chinese coin) (方孔錢 fāng kǒng qián), a type of usually copper or brass coin with a hole in the middle used in East Asia
  • Cash (currency), the name of several historical currency units in Asia
    • Chinese cash (currency) (文 wén), a historical Chinese currency unit
    • Vietnamese cash (văn), a historical Vietnamese currency unit and a type of copper coin
  • Cash (mass) (厘 ), a traditional Chinese weight unit
  • Cash's, or J.J Cash Ltd., a manufacturer of ribbons an other woven products, based in Coventry, England.

Cash (currency)

The cash is a name for several historical currencies used in Asia. It is applied to units used in China, Vietnam, and the Princely states of Madras and Travancore in British India. It is also occasionally used to refer to the Korean mun and the Japanese mon.

Skr.karsha 'a weight of silver or gold equal to of a tulā' (Williams); Singhalesekāsi coin. The early Portuguese writers represented the native word by cas, casse, caxa, the Fr. by cas, the Eng. by cass: the existing Pg.caixa and Eng. cash are due to a natural confusion with CASH n.1. From an early date the Portuguese applied caixa (probably on the same analogy) to the small money of other foreign nations, such as that of the Malay Islands, and especially the Chinese, which was also naturally made into cash in English. (Yule)" The English word " cash," meaning "tangible currency," is an older word from Middle Frenchcaisse.

Cash (2010 film)

Cash (stylized as Ca$h) is a 2010 American independent crime- thriller film directed by Stephen Milburn Anderson that stars Sean Bean and Chris Hemsworth.

Cash (1933 film)

Cash is a 1933 British comedy film directed by Zoltan Korda and starring Edmund Gwenn, Wendy Barrie and Robert Donat. It was made by Alexander Korda's London Film Productions.

Cash (surname)

Cash is an Anglo-Scottish surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Alan-Michael Cash (born 1987), American football player
  • Andrew Cash (born 1962), Canadian singer-songwriter
  • Bill Cash (born 1940), British Member of Parliament
  • Chris Cash (American football) (born 1980), player for the Atlanta Falcons
  • Craig Cash (born 1960), English comedy writer and performer
  • Dave Cash (baseball) (born 1948), former Major League baseball player
  • Dave Cash (disc jockey) (born 1942), British radio presenter
  • Dave Cash (Yiddish comedian), Romanian-born, Yiddish comedian
  • David Cash (born 1969), birth name of American wrestler performing as "Kid Kash"
  • Doug Cash (1919–2002), Australian politician
  • Dylan Cash (born 1994), American child actor
  • Fred Cash (born 1940), African-American soul singer
  • Gerald Cash (1917–2003), 3rd Governor-General of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas
  • George Cash (born 1946), Australian politician
  • James Cash, Jr. (born 1947), American businessman
  • Jim Cash (1941–2000), American film writer
  • John Cash, co-founder of Cash's
  • Johnny Cash (1932–2003), American singer-songwriter
    • June Carter Cash (1929–2003), Johnny's wife
    • John Carter Cash (born 1970), Johnny's son
    • Rosanne Cash (born 1955), Johnny's daughter
    • Tommy Cash (born 1940), Johnny's brother
    • Carey Cash, Johnny's grand-nephew
    • Kellye Cash, Johnny's grand-niece
  • Joseph Cash, co-founder of Cash's
  • Kevin Cash (born 1977), American Major League baseball catcher
  • Martin Cash (1808–1877), famous escaped convict in Australia
  • Michaelia Cash (born 1970), Australian politician
  • Norm Cash (1934–1986), American Major League baseball player
  • Pat Cash (born 1965), Australian professional tennis player
  • Peter Cash, Canadian singer-songwriter
  • Porkchop Cash (born 1955), stage name of American professional wrestler Bobby Cash
  • Ray Cash, American rapper
  • Ron Cash (1949–2009), American Major League Baseball player
  • Rosalind Cash (1938–1995), American singer and actress
  • Steve Cash (born 1946), American singer-songwriter
  • Swin Cash (born 1979), American Woman's National Basketball Association player
  • Tabatha Cash (born 1973), French pornographic actress
  • W. J. Cash (1900–1941), American author and journalist
  • William Cash (journalist), British journalist
  • William H. H. Cash (1843-1924), American businessman and politician
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Cash

Cash \Cash\, n. sing. & pl. A Chinese coin.

Note: In 1913 the cash (Chinese tsien) was the only current coin made by the chinese government. It is a thin circular disk of a very base alloy of copper, with a square hole in the center. 1,000 to 1,400 cash were equivalent to a dollar.

Cash

Cash \Cash\, v. t. [See Cashier.] To disband. [Obs.]
--Garges.

Cash

Cash \Cash\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Cashed; p. pr. & vb. n. Casing.] To pay, or to receive, cash for; to exchange for money; as, cash a note or an order.

Cash

Cash \Cash\ (k[a^]sh), n. [F. caisse case, box, cash box, cash. See Case a box.] A place where money is kept, or where it is deposited and paid out; a money box. [Obs.] This bank is properly a general cash, where every man lodges his money. --Sir W. Temple. [pounds]20,000 are known to be in her cash. --Sir R. Winwood. 2. (Com.)

  1. Ready money; especially, coin or specie; but also applied to bank notes, drafts, bonds, or any paper easily convertible into money.

  2. Immediate or prompt payment in current funds; as, to sell goods for cash; to make a reduction in price for cash.

    Cash account (Bookkeeping), an account of money received, disbursed, and on hand.

    Cash boy, in large retail stores, a messenger who carries the money received by the salesman from customers to a cashier, and returns the proper change. [Colloq.]

    Cash credit, an account with a bank by which a person or house, having given security for repayment, draws at pleasure upon the bank to the extent of an amount agreed upon; -- called also bank credit and cash account.

    Cash sales, sales made for ready, money, in distinction from those on which credit is given; stocks sold, to be delivered on the day of transaction.

    Syn: Money; coin; specie; currency; capital.

Wiktionary

cash

Etymology 1 n. 1 money in the form of notes/bills and coins, as opposed to cheques/checks or electronic transactions. 2 (context informal English) Money. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To exchange (a check/cheque) for money in the form of notes/bills. 2 (context poker slang English) To obtain a payout from a tournament. Etymology 2

n. Any of several low-denomination coins of India or China, especially the Chinese copper coin. Etymology 3

vb. To disband.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

cash

1590s, "money box;" also "money in hand, coin," from Middle French caisse "money box" (16c.), from Provençal caissa or Italian cassa, from Latin capsa "box" (see case (n.2)); originally the money box, but the secondary sense of the money in it became sole meaning 18c. Cash crop is attested from 1831; cash flow from 1954; the mechanical cash register from 1878.\n

\nLike many financial terms in English (bankrupt, etc.), ultimately from Italian. Not related to (but influencing the form of) the colonial British cash "Indian monetary system, Chinese coin, etc.," which is from Tamil kasu, Sanskrit karsha, Sinhalese kasi.

cash

"to convert to cash" (as a check, etc.), 1811, from cash (n.). Encash (1865) also was sometimes used. Related: Cashed; cashing.

WordNet

cash

  1. n. money in the form of bills or coins [syn: hard cash, hard currency]

  2. prompt payment for goods or services in currency or by check [syn: immediate payment] [ant: credit]

cash

v. exchange for cash; "I cashed the check as soon as it arrived in the mail" [syn: cash in]

Gazetteer

Cash, AR -- U.S. town in Arkansas

Population (2000): 294
Housing Units (2000): 141
Land area (2000): 0.365484 sq. miles (0.946600 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.365484 sq. miles (0.946600 sq. km)
FIPS code: 11920
Located within: Arkansas (AR), FIPS 05
Location: 35.798207 N, 90.933464 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 72421
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Cash, AR
Cash

Usage examples of "cash".

Martin Cash was a fellow countryman, born at Enniscorthy in County Wexford, and when he had been sent to Norfolk Island, he had talked freely of his exploits as absconder and bushranger, taking great pride in both.

In spite of all these considerations, I felt a sort of pleasure in accepting for ready cash all the counterfeit coins that she had spread out before me.

Most of them were short on cash, all of them had a reason to want Aden quiet or dead.

You could put an Adjutor into a cold sweat simply by suggesting something with cash value or money-making potential might be damaged.

Mask stole from Malvin, you may rest assured that Alker - should he be the Mask - would not dare to produce that cash.

As silent partner, Alker had supplied the required cash, only to find that he owed Malvin more than he could raise, due to trick clauses in the agreements that they signed.

A notary she trusted had estimated that the land had a market value of four to five hundred dollars an arpent and if Duddy wanted all of it and could pay the price he needed twenty thousand dollars cash.

Paying off the arsonist was not a problem - they had untraceable cash in abundance at their disposal and they had taken great care not to leave themselves open to identification by their pyrophilic agent.

Ban Sar Din, but he looked to the back of the ashram, even as he filled his other pocket with more jewels and cash.

Cash, a younger friend of George Eliot, and took tea with two most interesting, old ladies--one 82, and the other 80--who had befriended the famous authoress when she was poor and stood almost alone.

Most often, it dribbled in unpredictably in cash payments made in small bills that she counted out in front of me, making me feel guilty and avaricious for each and every dollar I was collecting.

The bundles of cash she stuffed into her purse, and the Baggie of cocaine she emptied into the toilet, which she patiently flushed three times.

I figured I had about a week and a half left of exchanging leftover baht and rupees before I completely ran out of cash, and the only way to get money from my parents was to return to the never-ending circuit of second opinions.

In my indignation I begged Rigerboos to come with me to Piccolomini, telling him that he might cash it without remark, and that otherwise he would witness what happened.

State expenses, that of those one hundred and forty millions and a great mass of private treasure besides, accumulated from various sources, a mere fifteen million remained for bequest, much of this not easily realizable in cash.