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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

care

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
antenatal care
▪ regular antenatal care
care home
Care in the Community
care label
care package
care worker
community care (=care for the sick, the old etc in their community rather than in hospital)
▪ Several voluntary organizations are involved in providing community care.
customer service/care (=serving and looking after customers)
▪ Our aim is always to raise the level of customer service.
day care centre/services/facilities
▪ subsidized day care facilities
day care
▪ subsidized day care facilities
dental treatment/care
▪ Dental care was free in the 60s.
extra care
▪ Drivers are advised to take extra care.
extreme care/caution
▪ It is necessary to use extreme caution with chemicals.
great care
▪ John always takes great care over his work.
health care (=care from doctors, nurses etc)
▪ Many Americans cannot afford even basic health care.
health care
▪ The government has promised wide-ranging health care for all.
hospital treatment/care
▪ What do older people think of hospital care?
intensive care unit
▪ The man is in the hospital’s intensive care unit.
intensive care
▪ He is still in intensive care in Bristol General Hospital.
left...in the care of
▪ She left her son in the care of a friend.
loving care
▪ the loving care with which the house has been restored
loving care
▪ What that child needs is plenty of loving care.
medical attention/treatment/care
▪ The injury required urgent medical attention.
not that I care (=I do not care)
▪ Sarah has a new boyfriend – not that I care.
primary care
▪ a primary care physician a doctor who provides primary care
primary health care
residential care
respite care
sb’s creative/caring/feminine etc side
▪ The art program is meant to bring out children’s creative side.
the caring professions (=ones that involve looking after people)
▪ A high proportion of people in the caring professions are women.
the health care system
▪ The West should be helping these countries to develop modern health care systems.
wraparound care
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
extra
▪ With Spectra or Dyneema, we have to adjust in the sleeving, and here a little extra care pays off dividends.
▪ The Senate added a $ 16 billion tobacco tax to provide extra health care funding for uninsured children.
▪ On the way down, the path can be muddy and steep and in places needs extra care.
▪ Take extra care if you are travelling.
▪ They tipped me for the extra care.
▪ We need to take extra care when talking to elderly people because they may not see or hear so well.
▪ In areas where gardens are protected and some extra care is provided, most cabbage varieties can be virtually a year-round crop.
good
▪ Others mentioned the convenience of having a booked admission date and better surroundings and care.
▪ He danced her around the room, promised to take better care of her than anyone ever had.
▪ Felicity loves it too, and probably takes far better care of it than I ever did.
▪ We know that owners take better care of homes than renters.
▪ She took good care of him.
▪ Not all good day care is so costly.
▪ We have to get him out Voice over Those who are to be brought out will receive the best of care.
▪ We want better education, better roads, and better health care, for the same tax dollar.
great
▪ George is very kind and caring and took great care over Lennie.
▪ In some stores, great care has gone into making that transformation pleasant.
▪ Reintroduction of food after elemental regimens must nevertheless be undertaken with the greatest of care irrespective of whether or not elimination diets are used.
▪ He began to weigh his words with great care, struggling to express himself as economically and clearly as possible.
▪ She wears a pink suede jacket with a studded fringe which she takes great care to hang.
▪ Taking great care where she placed her feet, she trod softly down the stairs.
▪ My choice had to be made with the greatest care and the most alert diagnostic skill.
▪ The stock must be chosen with great care.
institutional
▪ We re-interviewed those principal carers whose relatives, etc had moved to permanent institutional care by the end of one year.
▪ The avoidance of unnecessary institutional care by assessment of need for care.
▪ As we saw in Chapter 2 approximately 5 percent of those aged 65 + live in some form of institutional care.
▪ In institutional care there should be no place for such people.
▪ First is the possibility of an unnecessary increase in the number of old people consigned to institutional care.
▪ Even so, they were generally being sustained at home at a cost below that of institutional care.
▪ Only about 3-4% of all people aged 65+ are in some form of institutional care.
▪ Cases were closed when a client died, moved away, or went into permanent institutional care.
intensive
▪ Infusion of 50 to 100 mEq per 12 hours requires very close monitoring, usually in an intensive care setting.
▪ For the moment, Becky remains in intensive care, after falling from her horse on Saturday.
▪ Her son remained in guarded condition Monday in an intensive care unit.
▪ We have had public reports of a mortally ill little girl being unable to gain treatment in a paediatric intensive care unit.
▪ He was put on a life support machine in intensive care.
▪ This is not reported in the available literature on intensive care and may be a unique finding.
▪ Will he accept that there is indeed an acute shortage of intensive care beds for children?
medical
▪ There were lectures on quite advanced medical care, on intelligence-gathering, signalling and demolitions.
▪ They mix medical care and great menu variety for safe, often lifetime weight loss.
▪ Finally, such medical care will generally involve invasive drug therapy.
▪ Women detainees often get inadequate medical care.
▪ General practitioners have always had to manage and plan their businesses and are constantly adapting to changes in medical care.
▪ These include expenses for training and lost productivity, which equal and / or exceed medical care costs.
▪ With good medical care they often get better for a while.
▪ Or should they be blamed on inadequate medical care, poor diet or other environmental factors?
nursing
▪ Every nurse in the ward is responsible for promoting good nursing care.
▪ The following is an example of some cognitive objectives for teaching the nursing care of a patient recovering from heart surgery.
▪ The expected benefits of improved knowledge and nursing care by the learner can be summarised in aims and objectives.
▪ This can occur at any time but particularly when the student has been observed or supervised in her nursing care.
▪ Communication within the caring team, and the formation of nursing care plans, ensures continuity of patient care.
▪ He or she may have several diseases concurrently which will complicate nursing care.
▪ The student will learn realistic ways of ensuring good nursing care even when the workload is heavy.
▪ To develop an understanding of the psychological aspects of nursing care. 4.
patient
▪ Computer generated protocols Editor, - Richard J Lilford and colleagues show that structured methods of recording data can improve patient care.
▪ It is often the physician, as the person responsible for the activities required for patient care, who adopts this style.
▪ But better patient care is the ultimate aim.
▪ In these days of siege, psychiatrists must treat disaffection through militant group action and advocating conscientious, high-quality patient care.
▪ Criticism of the service side of training should be encouraged so improvements in student learning and patient care can be developed.
▪ The patient care records are reviewed against the established criteria.
▪ Hospitals now sell patient care including operations, X-rays, and blood tests, charging for everything.
▪ As well as acting as a support for the patient she will be gaining additional information relevant to her understanding of patient care.
personal
▪ They combined domestic, personal care, and specialist skills, taught by other professionals, such as physiotherapy, or speech therapy.
▪ The charge nurse and the nursing supervisor are the ones to talk to if there is any problem with personal care.
▪ All our residents receive a very special, personal kind of care.
▪ About 1 in 4 were in nursing and personal care facilities or offices and clinics of physicians.
▪ Looking at the evidence available, there seem to be four main principles which determine who offers personal care.
▪ For personal care the chain of complaint is: physician, charge nurse, nursing supervisor, hospital administrator, hospital director.
▪ My brief review of personal care given by relatives has stressed the theme of variation, especially by gender.
▪ The study, at a large Fortune 100 manufacturing company, focused on employees who provide personal care to an older relative.
primary
▪ However, it is possible that the clients who benefit mostly from primary care might be the nurses themselves.
▪ Medical groups often woo primary care doctors while sharply limiting the number o f specialists allowed on their referral lists.
▪ It recommends that resources for the developments in primary and community care to pump-prime and provide transitional support be secured urgently.
▪ Lahey Hitchock operates the largest physician practice in the state, employing more than 200 primary care doctors.
▪ Undergraduate students have begun to recognise the importance of primary care.
▪ Some primary care doctors' incomes have gone up slightly, and the others have seen their incomes remain steady.
▪ Thus hospital recommendations, based on discounted prices, can result in high cost commitments for primary care.
▪ Under managed care, patients are assigned to a primary care physician who determines what health services they will receive.
private
▪ A large number of private care agency customers are elderly or disabled people who are not social services clients.
▪ A private care home in my constituency accepted an elderly lady for respite care.
▪ The hon. Member for Wakefield said that he did not like private institutional care.
▪ Further moves could also be made towards increasing the two-way interaction between public and private health care sectors.
▪ Nine out of 10 directors say there should be compulsory registration of private care agencies.
▪ That also means a commitment to private residential care as much as to local authority residential care.
▪ Compensation packages for expatriates coming to Britain usually cover schooling costs, private medical care and housing costs.
▪ There are good examples of what can be done in private care.
reasonable
▪ Employees have a duty to take reasonable care in the performance of their duties.
▪ If a teacher fails to exercise reasonable care to protect his or her students from injury, the teacher is negligent.
▪ You must take reasonable care to avoid acts or omissions which you can reasonably foresee would be likely to injure your neighbour.
▪ If teachers do not use reasonable care, there is a breach of duty, and they are negligent.
▪ Employees are themselves under a duty to take reasonable care not to injure others in the course of their work.
▪ The duty in the law of negligence is not a duty to exercise reasonable care to avoid risk of causing injury.
▪ As it fails to enable Alan to take reasonable care for his own safety it will not have this effect.
▪ But if Clarence had exercised reasonable care, the court would have to decide whether the Trust were at fault.
residential
▪ It is supposed to end the uncertainty surrounding the limits of control of young people in residential care.
▪ The next chapter explores social work practice where a family member begins to need residential care.
▪ Out of 174 local authorities, 97 or over half had no residential care facilities for children and 24 had no arrangements at all.
▪ Women outnumber men by three to one in residential care.
▪ Thus Southwark, which exports 70% of adults needing residential care, will not receive adequate funding to pay for future placements.
▪ Fostering breakdowns account for an increasing number of admissions to residential care.
▪ That also means a commitment to private residential care as much as to local authority residential care.
▪ Then after ten weeks in residential care a family meeting was planned.
social
▪ Key points are: The report considers key national issues under the headings of community regeneration and social and community care.
▪ Coherent planning and coordination of health and social care would be facilitated by coterminous boundaries between the two authorities.
▪ These opinions will then be borne in mind when it comes to planning future health and social care policies.
▪ Many social services staff care considerably about the inadequacies of the policies they administer.
▪ Family support services. 5. Social care planning to mobilize packages of care. 6.
▪ At what point does social care become nursing?
▪ The care of stroke patients involves a plethora of different health and social care workers.
▪ For the minority who receive social care, the characteristics are significant reminders of their individuality and diversity.
special
▪ Both groups need very special care - yet so often they are the forgotten people in our community.
▪ The brave became a great chief, and he always took special care of his colt, which became a great horse.
▪ Bright new facilities and therapies were provided, plus enlightened teaching and special care.
▪ He took special care of the remaining one, and often slept with it in the corral.
▪ Thousands upon thousands of dollars would go into special care, training, and equipment for her.
▪ One example might be where a newborn child developed an infection requiring special care, but recovered in a few days.
▪ Country roads are often narrow and winding, so drivers should take special care and slow down.
■ NOUN
child
▪ It did nothing to provide better child care for women wishing to return to work.
▪ Most of them are wealthy men whose wives raise their children. Child care is not high on their agenda.
▪ Power relationships and relationships within informal networks are vitally important in all child care work.
▪ And the state, asked to investigate, says that dressing up is an appropriate part of a child care curriculum.
▪ In this area, solicitors can specialise in matters such as child care and other areas which specifically relate to local government.
▪ Instead of hiring child care I traded it with other parents: I had a list as long as my arm.
▪ We also have vacancies in specialist departments such as medicine and child care where the appropriate qualifications and experience are essential.
▪ Fortunately, women have changed sufficiently to make child care an issue.
customer
▪ This isn't just customer care: this is better margins and hard profit.
▪ Training implies that they do not, yet nobody seems to be able to point to any deterioration in customer care.
▪ Nothing about environmental impact, customer care, or good business practices.
▪ The delegation looked at a range of hotel operations including food preparation, customer care programmes, sales and marketing and budgeting.
▪ John had high standards of customer care and quality service.
▪ He still had a lot of contacts who valued his priorities of customer care and quality.
▪ Hotels have high standards of customer care and lift maintenance organisations have to understand these requirements.
day
▪ And an information day is being planned for anyone wanting to learn more about the day care centre appeal.
▪ Child care: day care, nursery school, babysitting.
▪ You are the person who actually provides the day to day care for residents.
▪ According to industry statistics, companies lose a total of $ 3 billion a year to workers' day care problems.
▪ Full day care facilities are available on request.
▪ His vision of the future is centered on individuals: job training, access to college, day care and so forth.
▪ The State of California shall provide a child welfare building to serve as day care centres for single parents.
▪ He pledged that pensioners using the earmarked homes for short stays and for day care would be found alternative facilities.
facility
▪ Day care facilities for the mentally handicapped include what used to be known as adult training centres.
▪ We re licensed as an acute care facility.
▪ Out of 174 local authorities, 97 or over half had no residential care facilities for children and 24 had no arrangements at all.
▪ With this merger, there are concerns about what happens to the workers in these health care facilities.
▪ Full day care facilities are available on request.
▪ About 1 in 4 were in nursing and personal care facilities or offices and clinics of physicians.
▪ Meanwhile, however, the lack of adequate community care facilities has led to a campaign to save the old mental hospitals.
▪ There are no health care facilities. 7.
health
▪ The result should be health care that is more predictable and efficient.
▪ It is essential that Londoners have the same rights of access to acute health care as their provincial counterparts.
▪ Process is defined as the sequence of established activities or procedures used by providers in the delivery of health care.
▪ In order to do this health authorities must have comprehensive information about the existing use of health care.
▪ Reproductive health care, crucial to women, was, as it had ever been, slighted.
▪ In Britain for the foreseeable future the ultimate purchaser of 80% or more of health care will continue to be the Treasury.
▪ Physicians and other health care workers are trying to design a health care system.
home
▪ In-service training, weekly group meetings and monthly supervision sessions were all provided for the home care aides.
▪ Long-term nursing home care would be the only benefit not available as soon as some one became a legal California resident.
▪ In the last decade the private sector has started to develop the amount of residential and nursing home care it provided.
▪ In the last six months of 1994 we had 65 people on home care.
▪ It has become the main provider of affordable home care for the elderly.
▪ Spending most of each day in out-of-#home care is a real risk factor for a baby.
▪ The night sitter left at 7 a.m. and the home care aide was due to come at 8 a.m.
▪ The numbers of men, women and children covered by home care with 24 hour on call has doubled in a year.
hospital
▪ Products offered by service industries include hospital care, dental treatment, holiday arrangements and accountancy services, for example. 5.
▪ She still needed hospital care but certainly seemed to be getting better.
▪ She is in hospital care until the baby-swop is sorted out.
▪ The training of more specialists and the provision of more day hospital care was duly set out.
▪ A constant theme in research concerned with the hospital care of older people is the discharge from hospital back to the community.
▪ Private nursing homes have higher levels of frailty than residential homes but not usually as high as long-stay hospital care.
▪ However, hospitals can not be closed down overnight and there is a need for a more positive approach to hospital care.
order
▪ For those reasons I allow the appeal and I substitute an interim care order.
▪ I was still under a care order so the Social Services put me in a hostel.
▪ The order will terminate when the child ceases to be of compulsory school age or if a care order is made.
▪ It can make a care order, a supervision order, a s8 order and a family assistance order.
▪ It can also make a s8 order in addition to a supervision order but not a care order.
▪ The local authority asserted that the threshold conditions, under which a care order could be made, had been met.
▪ The courts must now make care orders committing children to the care of the local authority.
▪ Social workers say they never had enough evidence of maltreatment to go to court for a care order.
plan
▪ The addition of the care plan will enable service agreements to be tailored to meet the needs of the individual user.
▪ Investor-owned managed care plans routinely take 20 percent to 30 percent of premium dollars off the top for profit and administration.
▪ As part of the care plan.
▪ The products and the care plans they produce are more in-depth.
▪ Communication within the caring team, and the formation of nursing care plans, ensures continuity of patient care.
▪ Her health care plan drew fire.
▪ They must also show their HIV/AIDS services are fully integrated into their community care plans.
▪ For some people, personal care plans will be drawn up.
reform
▪ Then there is the still unworkable sum which overhangs all this budgeting: how much health care reform will cost.
▪ The goals and activities in this plan are consistent with the goals set forth in recently proposed plans for health care reform.
▪ Many general practitioners fear that the community care reforms will increase their own workload, too.
▪ Doble pointed to one prime example of poor communication between elected officials and constituents: the health care reform debate.
▪ It also examines the relation between care management and care programming and raises some questions about future developments in the light of community care reforms.
▪ A far-reaching and comprehensive strategy, carefully integrated with broader plans for health care reform, is required.
▪ In the autumn of 1991 the Bush administration showed no interest in health care reform.
▪ The debate over health care reform in 1993-94 offers a vivid example.
respite
▪ This has worked well for both permanent and respite care.
▪ Any possibility of further reductions in respite care should be strenuously resisted.
▪ Coupled with the financial implications if carers decided they could no longer shoulder this burden the case for supporting respite care becomes overwhelming.
▪ Some proposals include provision of a day centre and respite care.
▪ It briefly outlines activities such as helplines, respite care services and consultation on community care proposals.
▪ A private care home in my constituency accepted an elderly lady for respite care.
▪ It is also developing a respite care service.
▪ A carers group might help, but what about some form of respite care for both the carer and the son?
service
▪ They could not cope even with very enhanced staffing levels and very supportive community care services.
▪ To deal with illness, they fund health care services.
▪ We are entering a period of deterioration in health care services.
▪ The salons, formerly known as Toni &038; Guy, offer clients a complete hair care service and have been completely refurbished.
▪ How much is spent on health care services?
▪ And it establishes care trusts and sets out legislation on long-term care excluding nursing care from community care services.
▪ An important feature will be the investigation of the relationship between women workers and women users of primary health care services.
▪ We've already identified a need for a home care service which we aim to meet.
system
▪ This paper underlines the importance of maintaining a functional health care system even during times of political change and unrest.
▪ Whatever Congress does to fix it is likely to put severe pressures on the rest of the health care system.
▪ We can now deal with the main problems that could arise in the new community care system.
▪ That was the conclusion of a General Accounting Office report in 1992 on fraud in the health care system.
▪ Primary care physicians' experience of financial incentives in managed-care systems.
▪ Once they are enmeshed in the often-chaotic foster care system it is extraordinarily difficult to get out of it.
▪ New hair care system One of the most exciting happenings in hair and scalp care lately comes from respected trichologist Philip Kingsley.
▪ Our health care system is out of control.
take
▪ He was offering me the trip of a lifetime, and all I had to do was take care of the meals.
▪ When sanding take care not to round the sharp edges.
▪ The expert's advice today was take care.
unit
▪ From these studies we've developed criteria to identify who needs to go to a coronary care unit and who doesn't.
▪ There is a 16-bed intensive care unit and two operating rooms that can also be expanded.
▪ Mrs Carrington takes up the account from the time when her husband was admitted to the intensive care unit.
▪ Ludington plans to introduce the therapy into the transitional care unit that caters to preemies at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
▪ Facilities will include an intensive care unit and an oiled bird cleaning facility.
▪ He is in stable condition in the intensive care unit at Kaiser Medical Center in Vallejo.
▪ The second is, if there are to be intensive care units, what share of resources should they have?
▪ Her son remained in guarded condition Monday in an intensive care unit.
worker
▪ Hazards associated with heating and walking are examples of matters to which care workers must attend.
▪ Maritza started to work with the foster care workers to get her children back.
▪ The revised guidelines are expected to avoid giving care workers specific advice on how to physically restrain absconders.
▪ Social workers and other primary care workers are well placed to identify people who have long-term social difficulties and poor coping resources.
▪ Health care workers should have a tuberculin skin test at least every two years.
▪ Yet it illustrates vividly the extent of the power which may be implicit in the relationship between care worker and old person.
▪ Further information: Recruiting and employing a personal care worker by M Dunne.
■ VERB
manage
▪ The St Helens project was initiated and led by the health authority but really managed by the joint care planning team.
▪ Under the regional managed care systems, most Medicaid patients would be served by health maintenance organizations.
▪ Doctors' incomes Doctors are generally earning less these days as managed care becomes a larger part of the medical marketplace.
▪ Meanwhile, economists argue about whether the true cost of healthcare has even gone down under managed care.
▪ He says that managed care firms integrate physical and mental health care.
▪ Shares of the managed-care company rose 1 1 / 2 to 58 1 / 4.
▪ California leads the nation in shifting to managed care, with San Diego County in the vanguard.
▪ But now, cost pressures in competitive managed care markets have led to cost-cutting.
need
▪ To succeed, you needed to take great care that you peaked just as the winning-post hove into view.
▪ This child also needs consistency in his care and love.
▪ The next chapter explores social work practice where a family member begins to need residential care.
▪ Who is likely to need long-term care insurance?
▪ On the way down, the path can be muddy and steep and in places needs extra care.
▪ They are usually set up near their convents, for premature and sick children need constant care.
▪ We need to take extra care when talking to elderly people because they may not see or hear so well.
▪ It will need your care to become established, especially in hot, dry weather.
provide
▪ Reflect the principal aspirations of the professions to provide better care.
▪ Or one county could provide child care while the next county did not.
▪ He says they've got the interests of the whole county to consider and they want to provide modern patient care.
▪ As the staff looks toward the future, its game plan is to provide quality care.
▪ The Health Education Council project on providing effective health care in a multi-racial society provides a useful checklist for assessing local services.
▪ She had a network of neighbors and relatives that provided child care.
▪ Community-based clinics, such as Aldershot Health Centre, can provide complete care for leg ulcers.
▪ Some patients report troubles persuading their managed-care health plans to provide cutting-edge care.
receive
▪ When a child or young person is received into care a placement with a carer or carers has to be made.
▪ He estimated that half had been receiving substandard care.
▪ I must give you my personal assurances that this infant is receiving perfect care.
▪ Or it could mean you received no care at all.
▪ Did they receive similar care at the same time or in the same order?
▪ Also, the percentage of District women who receive adequate prenatal care has improved somewhat since the start of the decade.
▪ Further requests were made to receive S into care.
▪ In many places, the children of these immigrants were prevented from going to school or receiving medical care.
require
▪ This requires care and patience in the preparation, performance, and marking of the tests but it can be most rewarding.
▪ Obviously, sleeping pills are not harmless; they are drugs that require caution and care in use.
▪ A child may, for instance, be born with serious handicaps or developmental problems requiring extended periods of care.
▪ Or should they concentrate their efforts on looking after those sufferers who require nursing care in day hospitals or wards?
▪ It does not require science to inform us that infants require infant care and children require child care.
▪ If the disorder is severe the patient may also require full care and, very occasionally, physical control.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
domiciliary services/care/visits etc
▪ Developments in day care, the home help service and other domiciliary services were the currency of growth in these departments.
▪ Hence domiciliary visits by medical staff are an integral part of any specialist service.
▪ It supplements care by kin, but families continue to provide the bulk of domiciliary care.
▪ Last year only voluntary Welfare Officer alone, made over 102 domiciliary visits.
▪ Nevertheless, companies trading in domiciliary care are now beginning to multiply - some from a base in the residential sector.
▪ One of the principal domiciliary services is that of home helps.
▪ Success typically gives access to one existing service, such as domiciliary care, and rejects another, such as residential care.
▪ Traditionally the burden of long-term domiciliary care has fallen on women.
don't give a hoot/don't care two hoots
not care/give tuppence
not know/care beans (about sb/sth)
tender loving care
▪ Mom gave us kids a lot of tender loving care.
▪ Right now I just need some tender loving care.
▪ At some level they still cling to the idea that tender loving care is the only factor in raising kids.
▪ Hospitals needed some one to give tender loving care to chil-dren, social agencies had various similar needs, and so on.
▪ It is the routine and tender loving care of the staff that create the best atmosphere.
▪ Lucky patients get superb nursing care, infused with professionalism and tender loving care.
▪ Mandy had plied her with tender loving care until the tears had come.
▪ The Backup New yachts suffer from teething problems, and older yachts need lots of tender loving care.
▪ Voice over Millie will need tender loving care and a lot of medical treatment before going home.
▪ With glass and tender loving care it can be done.
the utmost importance/respect/care etc
▪ Brian was always keen to stress that the comfort and wellbeing of the birds was of the utmost importance.
▪ Everyone has the utmost respect for Rickey Henderson.
▪ How soon and how broadly will you communicate that the changes at hand are of the utmost importance?
▪ Hygiene and safety take priority on the sunbeds while personal supervision is regarded as of the utmost importance on the toning tables.
▪ In fact I have the utmost respect for it.
▪ In particular in the sophisticated world of alchemy, the resonances of chemical and other truths were of the utmost importance.
▪ It is of the utmost importance that it is the mind of the human operator doing the selecting.
▪ Professors Berry and Mott are right to stress that the support of the child and the family is of the utmost importance.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Care of the environment has become a priority in government thinking.
▪ All employees have been trained in the care of young children.
▪ hair-care products
▪ I'd advise you to follow a new skin care routine.
▪ Movies set you free from your cares for a while.
▪ She has become a leading expert on the care and maintenance of Renaissance paintings.
▪ skin care lotions
▪ The note on the box read, "Fragile - handle with care."
▪ These photocopiers require a little extra care to keep them running right.
▪ Your father will need constant medical care.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A comprehensive review of the patient can be achieved through the use of the care plan.
▪ Finally, such medical care will generally involve invasive drug therapy.
▪ He had spent two hours taking care of his tires in the rain.
▪ I planned this thing with care.
▪ It recommends that resources for the developments in primary and community care to pump-prime and provide transitional support be secured urgently.
▪ Mud-Pony-Boy healed the horse with loving care and herbal compresses for the injured foot.
▪ Take care to fit the diodes and electrolytic capacitors the correct way round.
▪ The other is preventive health care for all, including prenatal care.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
about
▪ All you've ever cared about is being approved of, like a little girl at a party.
▪ In the end, all you really cared about was what the Krausses of this world would think.
▪ Even the cash-flow predictions they cared about so much were nothing to her but answers she wanted ticked.
▪ The results were shocking, at least to people who care about squandered money.
▪ All he cares about are women and booze.
▪ Because no one I cared about ever looked at me as if I were beautiful.
▪ I care the way Jefferson cared about his rats and their portal shunts.
▪ The last person West buried that he cared about was his wife.
deeply
▪ Billie could see their closeness when Adam let her out, saw that they cared deeply for each other.
▪ We care deeply about u hat governments do, but this is a book about how they work.
▪ I care deeply about the comedy in the movie, that it's well-executed and fresh.
▪ He cared deeply about his beloved state of Massachusetts and about our country and its future.
▪ Yes, she had really cared deeply.
▪ He cared deeply for the human condition.
▪ It hurt her to think that Fernando cared deeply enough for another woman to do it.
▪ The marriage was a good one and Brenda and her husband clearly cared deeply about each other.
enough
▪ Some one cares enough to sponsor his education.
▪ He couldn't move as Richmann passed out of his field of vision, not caring enough to even notice Carrefour any longer.
▪ She thought she would never care enough about anyone to give birth to them or to kill them.
▪ She had not tried hard enough because she did not care enough.
▪ Only Jezrael doesn't care enough to find me, does she?
▪ I don't frankly think he cares enough either way to worry.
▪ After months of weeping and shouting and apologising, she did not care enough.
for
▪ Once the young are born they may be cared for by both their parents for many days.
▪ They want to have babies, but only as many as they can care for.
▪ Some older people want to be cared for by their children, others most definitely do not.
▪ Some small but particularly beautiful areas of woods, cliffs and islands are preserved and cared for by the National Trust.
▪ He was cared for by the Sisters of Mercy at the Horsforth home for retired clergy.
▪ If the message could have been from some one you care for, then where's the harm in it?
▪ Thus, those who are committed to caring for and working with old people have first to face two facts.
how
▪ Sailors waiting there hauled them roughly on to the ship, not caring how they landed.
▪ Alyssia didn't care how she looked.
▪ I don't care how long it takes us.
▪ As far as he is concerned, nobody cares how accurate our portrayal of Claudia's love life is.
▪ And even people who say they don't care how they look care how they look.
▪ Since Caliban wants to give, I don't care how much paper I waste.
▪ Obviously Delia Cope is a white middle class racist woman who really doesn't care how she oppresses us as Black women.
less
▪ Many of them care less about the exchange rate than about what is shown on the chart on the right.
▪ Today, corporations have become more streamlined and less caring.
▪ But at this moment Kate could not have cared less if he was a mass murderer.
▪ Guess their Sunday viewers are mostly trailer dwellers who could care less about public affairs.
▪ I was sopping, and I didn't care less.
▪ Now I seem to care less and less.
▪ They sort of couldn't care less if you were going to leave at the end of the fourth year.
▪ The suits overseeing news and editorial functions have no loyalty to this community and could care less about it.
much
▪ He didn't much care for it now that he looked at it closely.
▪ Nobody cared much what happened to it.
▪ I do not care much now about the way the women gape at me when I walk around in the village center.
▪ If Mr Parnham doesn't like it and we're both fired then I don't much care.
▪ Their menus had been planned with as much care as any part of the mission.
▪ Anyhow, he did not care much.
▪ Though I was floundering, I did not much care.
really
▪ She had contrarily thought that if he really cared he would have come running after her.
▪ In the end, all you really cared about was what the Krausses of this world would think.
▪ Do you know, sometimes I feel that the only person he really cares for on this earth is the Begum.
▪ I don't really care about what happened last year.
▪ I have to say I didn't really care much for that kind of approach.
▪ How deeply did people really care?
▪ Even if that flat pass from Wilkinson was forward, it was so short that nobody really cared.
▪ But be honest, do you really care?
■ NOUN
baby
▪ Sangenic is so easy and quick to use that it allows you more time to care for your baby.
▪ The infant's death occurred when her father was caring for the baby while his wife was at work.
▪ It was then that Carrie took over, dividing her time between caring for her baby and attending to her customers.
▪ You will soon see how Pampers are caring for your baby ... and your baby's world.
▪ I share at least half the household duties, including feeding and caring for the baby while my partner works and plays.
▪ The couple caring for the baby in their Middlesbrough home realise there is a long way to go.
▪ Visits Heidi's mum Christine, who is unable to care for baby because of severe post-natal depression, visits every day.
▪ I no longer need to work and she was delighted when I offered to care for the baby during the week.
child
▪ They get married and move, and may have young children to care for.
▪ The study was of 482 children who were cared for by a private pediatric practice in suburban Philadelphia.
▪ The animal kingdom gets its fair share of attention as children learn how to care for pets.
▪ With one small child to care for, she went on welfare, and soon won a scholarship to college.
▪ Currently grandparents are raising 3. 4 million children; 6 million families depend on grandparents for primary child care.
▪ Girl, now show me my way, for I have a child to care for.
▪ Eliminating state barriers to checking criminal backgrounds of child care workers.
family
▪ Relatives are often fearful of complaining lest there is a backlash in the kind of treatment or care the family member receives.
▪ Women who really care about their families make it fresh every day.
▪ They don't care about their families.
▪ She was cared for by various families of the city and earned money for her board by attending small children.
▪ They don't care about the family man getting shot, they don't care about the families.
▪ What did Claire care about families?
▪ He didn't care if his family thought him great.
health
▪ However, in health care the concept is more difficult to explain.
▪ She spends $ 300 or less on health care a year and pays $ 1, 625 in Medicare and Medigap premiums.
▪ Take, for example, the vexed subject of health care.
▪ She knew nothing about health care.
▪ The trend is likely to place unprecedented demands on the health care system, principally for nursing and custodial care.
▪ It was also a strong year for health care investing.
▪ No employer would have to pay more than 7. 9 percent of payroll on health care.
▪ During the quarter, investors continued to snap up selected stocks in two hot industries: technology and health care.
hospital
▪ The new hospital will care for the annual 3,000 or so wildlife casualties in the area.
▪ But they believe there will always be a need for hospitals to care for volatile children who have exhausted every other alternative.
▪ The staff were used to the rigours of war ... The hospital was opened to care for Amnerican casualties in 1942.
▪ Improving models I work in a psychiatric hospital on a unit caring for functionally ill elderly people.
▪ Relatives may make a gift to a local hospital that has cared for a loved one.
▪ The trial continues. HOSPITAL nurses caring for elderly patients are fighting plans to ban uniforms on the wards.
others
▪ Spurred by the horrors he witnessed in war, Cheshire dedicated his life to caring for others after it was over.
▪ Of course, he'd given up medicine to pursue comedy, but he was absolutely at his best when caring for others.
▪ He seemed to care little about what others, beyond his parents, thought of him.
▪ Lucky child, to be so well cared for while others suffer so much!
▪ I have cared for others all of my adult life.
▪ The ultimate virtue, I thought, is caring for others.
▪ Who relieves the state of the burden of caring for others?
parent
▪ Many adult children gain great happiness from caring for a much-loved parent in the closing years of their life.
▪ Will restoring some economic equity to the family guarantee that every child will have responsible and caring parents?
▪ It's the strain of caring for a parent with Alzheimers disease.
▪ The ideal of caring for aging parents is sufficiently strong that even the most undeserving aging parents can ride its coattails.
▪ We are also taught to be caring and nurturing parents.
▪ The opportunity exists right there to be a wise and caring parent.
▪ Many daughters who are caring full-time for a parent or parents at home have financial worries too.
▪ It is women who have traditionally borne the daily burden of caring for ill parents, children, relatives and friends.
patient
▪ The abilities of staff and availability of facilities to care for critically ill patients vary in all areas of health care.
▪ In both black and Latino practices, doctors were more likely to care for the poor patients.
▪ These will be in effect, a statement of the treatment and care a patient should receive with associated standards attached.
▪ He had been caring for a stroke patient who seemed to understand much of what was said to him.
▪ The student who has cared for a patient is in the best position to evaluate and report on his or her progress.
▪ Most people caring for diabetic patients realise the importance of the patient actively participating in the very first injection of insulin.
▪ As a junior nurse it is important that you receive extra instruction and practice under supervision before caring for these patients.
▪ Specialist nurses Many health authorities employ nurses in specialist roles to care for patients with particular needs.
people
▪ The government's being urged to provide more financial support for people who care for sick or disabled relatives.
▪ Few people notice or perhaps care when such inspections are directed at commercial enterprises.
▪ Some older people want to be cared for by their children, others most definitely do not.
▪ A few people care about news, and only a tiny percentage of those care about serious news.
▪ There are some people who don't care if you are a hero or not.
▪ Only shallow people care about appearances, so if I look like this, I must be deep.
▪ But other people wouldn't care about that.
▪ James was also tremendously loyal to people he cared about, and in him I found a true friend.
■ VERB
love
▪ I really want to know she is loved and cared for.
▪ The heart-centred loving and caring aspect of our make-up is where compassion resides.
▪ What is important, however, is to convey to children that they are loved and cared for.
seem
▪ He didn't seem to care that Nick was so much younger than he was.
▪ He seemed to care little about what others, beyond his parents, thought of him.
▪ But very few people seem to care.
▪ But the public seemed not to care.
▪ He didn't seem to care.
▪ But my psychology professors seemed not to care at all about minorities.
▪ Few academic historians seem to care about the literary elegance that sustains the essay form.
▪ The building is crawling with people who seem to care less about the job itself than about holding on to it.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
domiciliary services/care/visits etc
▪ Developments in day care, the home help service and other domiciliary services were the currency of growth in these departments.
▪ Hence domiciliary visits by medical staff are an integral part of any specialist service.
▪ It supplements care by kin, but families continue to provide the bulk of domiciliary care.
▪ Last year only voluntary Welfare Officer alone, made over 102 domiciliary visits.
▪ Nevertheless, companies trading in domiciliary care are now beginning to multiply - some from a base in the residential sector.
▪ One of the principal domiciliary services is that of home helps.
▪ Success typically gives access to one existing service, such as domiciliary care, and rejects another, such as residential care.
▪ Traditionally the burden of long-term domiciliary care has fallen on women.
don't give a hoot/don't care two hoots
not care/give tuppence
not give a fig/not care a fig (about/for sth/sb)
not give/care a sod
not know/care beans (about sb/sth)
tender loving care
▪ Mom gave us kids a lot of tender loving care.
▪ Right now I just need some tender loving care.
▪ At some level they still cling to the idea that tender loving care is the only factor in raising kids.
▪ Hospitals needed some one to give tender loving care to chil-dren, social agencies had various similar needs, and so on.
▪ It is the routine and tender loving care of the staff that create the best atmosphere.
▪ Lucky patients get superb nursing care, infused with professionalism and tender loving care.
▪ Mandy had plied her with tender loving care until the tears had come.
▪ The Backup New yachts suffer from teething problems, and older yachts need lots of tender loving care.
▪ Voice over Millie will need tender loving care and a lot of medical treatment before going home.
▪ With glass and tender loving care it can be done.
the utmost importance/respect/care etc
▪ Brian was always keen to stress that the comfort and wellbeing of the birds was of the utmost importance.
▪ Everyone has the utmost respect for Rickey Henderson.
▪ How soon and how broadly will you communicate that the changes at hand are of the utmost importance?
▪ Hygiene and safety take priority on the sunbeds while personal supervision is regarded as of the utmost importance on the toning tables.
▪ In fact I have the utmost respect for it.
▪ In particular in the sophisticated world of alchemy, the resonances of chemical and other truths were of the utmost importance.
▪ It is of the utmost importance that it is the mind of the human operator doing the selecting.
▪ Professors Berry and Mott are right to stress that the support of the child and the family is of the utmost importance.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Buy her some flowers to show her you really care.
▪ I'm very lucky to have a husband, family and friends who care about me.
▪ Of course I care about Kirsty - that's why I want to help her.
▪ Of course I care about the homeless and the unemployed, but what can I do?
▪ She thinks we're interfering but we're only doing it because we care.
▪ Some kids' parents don't care what they do.
▪ Thousands are dying from disease and starvation and yet no one seems to care.
▪ We make a range of natural, additive-free foods for people who really care what they eat.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But audiences didn't care if the film died.
▪ But Theresa would not care, being almost glad to be all wrong in some sphere.
▪ Despite knowing all this, and caring about it, I would sometimes lose the rag with him.
▪ He was saying that he cared about them too much to let them feed on self-delusion.
▪ If Foley were a traitor, he did not care who knew it, it would seem.
▪ The building is crawling with people who seem to care less about the job itself than about holding on to it.
▪ We care not a pin, though they are ne'er so sad.
Wikipedia

Care

Care may refer to:

Care (band)

Care were a new wave band formed by Paul Simpson and Ian Broudie in 1983 in Liverpool, England. Care was created after the split of The Wild Swans when singer Paul Simpson (also ex-keyboardist for the Teardrop Explodes) came together with guitarist Ian Broudie (previously of Big in Japan and Original Mirrors). The first single was released in June 1983.

Care (Shriekback album)

Care is the first full-length Shriekback album, released in 1983 as a follow-up to the Tench EP. The single "Lined Up" was a minor club hit and reached number 39 on the Australian ARIA charts. "Lined Up" was released twice in the UK (the second time as a remix), peaking at number 89 initially and number 78 for the remix. The album itself spent 3 weeks on the Billboard album chart, peaking at number 188.

Care (Law & Order: UK)

"Care" is the first episode of the British police procedural and legal television program, Law & Order: UK. "Care" follows the case of a dead infant dropped off at a hospital to the corrupt estate agent whose negligence caused his death. Written by Chris Chibnall, directed by Omar Madha, and produced by Richard Stokes, "Care" originally aired on .

CARE (relief agency)

CARE International (Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere)

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Founded

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Leadership

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Field

Scope

Website

CARE (Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere) is a major international humanitarian agency delivering emergency relief and long-term international development projects. Founded in 1945, CARE is nonsectarian, impartial, and non-governmental. It is one of the largest and oldest humanitarian aid organizations focused on fighting global poverty. In 2014, CARE reported working in 90 countries, supporting 880 poverty-fighting projects and humanitarian aid projects, and reaching over 72 million people.

CARE's programmes in the developing world address a broad range of topics including emergency response, food security, water and sanitation, economic development, climate change, agriculture, education, and health. CARE also advocates at the local, national, and international levels for policy change and the rights of poor people. Within each of these areas, CARE focuses particularly on empowering and meeting the needs of women and girls and promoting gender equality.

CARE International is a confederation of fourteen CARE National Members, each of which is registered as an autonomous non-profit non-governmental organization in the country. The fourteen CARE National Members are CARE Australia, CARE Canada, CARE Danmark, CARE Deutschland-Luxembourg, CARE France, CARE India, CARE International Japan, CARE Nederland, CARE Norge, CARE Österreich, Raks Thai Foundation (CARE Thailand), CARE International UK, CARE USA, and CARE Peru. Programs in developing countries are usually managed by a Country Office, but CARE also supports projects and may respond to emergencies in some countries where they do not maintain a full Country Office.

CARE (New Zealand)

CARE (from the full term 'Citizens Association for Racial Equality') was a New Zealand organisation that fought against racism towards minority groups in New Zealand.

During the 1960s, CARE attacked policies such as the common de facto policy of banks not to employ Māori and compulsory pregnancy test for recent immigrants from Samoa. CARE became particularly famous in New Zealand through its vocal opposition to South African apartheid, particularly via organising resistance to any links with South Africa during the apartheid era. CARE was heavily involved in the huge protests against the 1981 Springbok Tour.

Its long term secretary was Tom Newnham.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Care

Care \Care\ (k[^a]r), n. [AS. caru, cearu; akin to OS. kara sorrow, Goth. kara, OHG chara, lament, and perh. to Gr. gh^rys voice. Not akin to cure. Cf. Chary.]

  1. A burdensome sense of responsibility; trouble caused by onerous duties; anxiety; concern; solicitude.

    Care keeps his watch in every old man's eye, And where care lodges, sleep will never lie.
    --Shak.

  2. Charge, oversight, or management, implying responsibility for safety and prosperity.

    The care of all the churches.
    --2 Cor. xi. 28.

    Him thy care must be to find.
    --Milton.

    Perplexed with a thousand cares.
    --Shak.

  3. Attention or heed; caution; regard; heedfulness; watchfulness; as, take care; have a care.

    I thank thee for thy care and honest pains.
    --Shak.

  4. The object of watchful attention or anxiety.

    Right sorrowfully mourning her bereaved cares.
    --Spenser.

    Syn: Anxiety; solicitude; concern; caution; regard; management; direction; oversight. -- Care, Anxiety, Solicitude, Concern. These words express mental pain in different degress. Care belongs primarily to the intellect, and becomes painful from overburdened thought. Anxiety denotes a state of distressing uneasiness fron the dread of evil. Solicitude expresses the same feeling in a diminished degree. Concern is opposed to indifference, and implies exercise of anxious thought more or less intense. We are careful about the means, solicitous and anxious about the end; we are solicitous to obtain a good, anxious to avoid an evil.

Care

Care \Care\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Cared; p. pr. & vb. n. Caring.] [AS. cearian. See Care, n.] To be anxious or solicitous; to be concerned; to have regard or interest; -- sometimes followed by an objective of measure. I would not care a pin, if the other three were in. --Shak. Master, carest thou not that we perish? --Mark. iv. 38. To care for.

  1. To have under watchful attention; to take care of.

  2. To have regard or affection for; to like or love.

    He cared not for the affection of the house.
    --Tennyson.

WordNet

care

  1. v. feel concern or interest; "I really care about my work"; "I don't care"

  2. provide care for; "The nurse was caring for the wounded" [syn: give care]

  3. prefer or wish to do something; "Do you care to try this dish?"; "Would you like to come along to the movies?" [syn: wish, like]

  4. be in charge of, act on, or dispose of; "I can deal with this crew of workers"; "This blender can't handle nuts"; "She managed her parents' affairs after they got too old" [syn: manage, deal, handle]

  5. be concerned with; "I worry about my grades" [syn: worry]

care

  1. n. the work of caring for or attending to someone or something; "no medical care was required"; "the old car needed constant attention" [syn: attention, aid, tending]

  2. judiciousness in avoiding harm or danger; "he exercised caution in opening the door"; "he handled the vase with care" [syn: caution, precaution, forethought]

  3. an anxious feeling; "care had aged him"; "they hushed it up out of fear of public reaction" [syn: concern, fear]

  4. a cause for feeling concern; "his major care was the illness of his wife"

  5. attention and management implying responsibility for safety; "he is in the care of a bodyguard" [syn: charge, tutelage, guardianship]

  6. activity involved in maintaining something in good working order; "he wrote the manual on car care" [syn: maintenance, upkeep]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

care

Old English caru, cearu "sorrow, anxiety, grief," also "burdens of mind; serious mental attention," from Proto-Germanic *karo (cognates: Old Saxon kara "sorrow;" Old High German chara "wail, lament;" Gothic kara "sorrow, trouble, care;" German Karfreitag "Good Friday"), from PIE root *gar- "cry out, call, scream" (cognates: Irish gairm "shout, cry, call;" see garrulous).\n

\nDifferent sense evolution in related Dutch karig "scanty, frugal," German karg "stingy, scanty." The sense development in English is from "cry" to "lamentation" to "grief." Meaning "charge, oversight, protection" is attested c.1400, the sense in care of in addressing. To take care of "take in hand, do" is from 1580s.

care

Old English carian, cearian "be anxious, grieve; to feel concern or interest," from Proto-Germanic *karo- "lament," hence "grief, care" (cognates: Old High German charon "to lament," Old Saxon karon "to care, to sorrow"), from the same source as care (n.). OED emphasizes that it is in "no way related to L. cura." Related: Cared; caring.\n

\nTo not care as a negative dismissal is attested from mid-13c. Phrase couldn't care less is from 1946; could care less in the same sense (with an understood negative) is from 1957. Care also figures in many "similies of indifference" in the form don't care a _____, with the blank filled by fig, pin, button, cent, straw, rush, point, farthing, snap, etc., etc.\n

\nPositive senses, such as "have an inclination" (1550s); "have fondness for" (1520s) seem to have developed later as mirrors to the earlier negative ones.

Wiktionary

care

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context obsolete English) grief, sorrow. 2 Close attention; concern; responsibility. 3 worry. 4 maintenance, upkeep. 5 The treatment of those in need (especially as a profession). Etymology 2

vb. (label en intransitive) To be concerned about, have an interest in.

Usage examples of "care".

Notary take care to set it down that the said abjuration was made by one gravely suspected of heresy, so that if she should be proved to have relapsed, she should then be judged accordingly and delivered up to the secular Court.

The gap between what was human, with this smart, caring woman, and what was inhuman, with the gomers and the abusers, became too much.

The sisters were busy with their toddlers doing that Yuppie shuffle of day care for the abysmally affluent.

I highly recommend codeine and acetaminophen for putting your cares behind you.

Ravensbund as he ruled the rest of Achar, but as far as the Ravensbundmen knew or cared, the Achar King had as much control over them as he did over the Forbidden.

Malipiero would often inquire from me what advantages were accruing to me from the welcome I received at the hands of the respectable ladies I had become acquainted with at his house, taking care to tell me, before I could have time to answer, that they were all endowed with the greatest virtue, and that I would give everybody a bad opinion of myself, if I ever breathed one word of disparagement to the high reputation they all enjoyed.

Distracted with the care, not of acquiring, but of preserving an empire, oppressed with age and infirmities, careless of fame, and satiated with power, all his prospects of life were closed.

Both he and the actress concluded that Branicki had had a quarrel with her rival, and though she did not much care to place him in the number of her adorers, she yet gave him a good reception, for she knew it would be dangerous to despise his suit openly.

And who cared about werewolves infecting the unwary so long as you could get a good manicure or acupuncture treatment?

There are cases where it is advisable, in states too poor or niggardly to care adequately for their defectives and delinquents, but eugenists should favor segregation as the main policy, with sterilization for the special cases as previously indicated.

The translations have all been made with care, but for the sake of younger pupils simplified and modernized as much as close adherence to the sense would permit.

Abu Obeidah admonished his brethren not to despise the baser origin of Dames, since he himself, could he relinquish the public care, would cheerfully serve under the banner of the slave.

Parents who are sensitive to this unstated plea and who, through acts of love, concern, restraint, and respect, demonstrate repeatedly It Is You We Care About will find the years of adolescence can produce rewards and surprises far beyond their expectations.

Though Catholic adoption services took considerable care in the placement of children, they were not pointlessly slow and obstructive, as were public agencies, especially when the would-be adopters were solid members of the community like Hatch and Lindsey, and when the adoptee was a disabled child with no option except continued institutionalization.

I wished them a good night, and as soon as I was in bed the god of dreams took me under his care, and made me pass the night with the adorable Mdlle.