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Crossword clues for cake

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
cake
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a birthday cake
▪ She had a birthday cake with 21 silver candles on it.
a chocolate cake/biscuit/pudding etc
▪ For her birthday he made a chocolate cake.
a cream cake/bunBritish English (= a cake with cream inside)
be caked with blood (=covered with dry blood)
▪ The cat's fur was caked with blood.
cake pan
cake slice
cake tin
caked with mud (=covered in mud)
▪ boots caked with mud
cake/soup etc mix
▪ Add water to the cake mix and bake at 375°F.
Christmas cake
devil's food cake
Dundee cake
Eccles cake
fairy cake
hot cake
▪ Copies of the book are selling like hot cakes.
Madeira cake
oat cake
pound cake
simnel cake
sponge cake
the wedding cake
▪ The bride and groom cut the wedding cake.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ A big birthday cake came out for Sandra with eighteen candles which she ceremoniously blew out.
▪ And of course the birthday boy should always get the biggest slice of cake.
▪ But Harry can expect a big cake, a pile of cards ... and a special phone call from home.
chocolate
▪ According to friends close to her then, her only vice was a double portion of her favourite chocolate cake.
▪ Each of us receives a slice of heavenly chocolate cake.
▪ There's been a chocolate cake.
▪ To serve, set several orange slices alongside a slice of chocolate cake.
▪ She would have been on the floor for those pastries, and after the chocolate cake.
▪ A chocolate nut upside-down cake was the request of Teresa Ipock of Longview, Wash.
▪ His winning concoction was Macadamia Fudge Torte: chocolate cake with fudge-filled cavities, topped by macadamia nut streusel.
▪ A molten chocolate cake served with a scoop of chestnut ice cream borders on a religious experience.
cream
▪ And then Emily fetched the cream cakes in from the fridge.
▪ Abba were a sausage on the cream cake of pop.
▪ There were always cream cakes and I would be brought mine ceremoniously on a plate.
▪ For a treat for myself I'd occasionally buy a cream cake.
▪ Fat people can't stop eating because someday there will be no more cream cakes.
▪ The blow was softened somewhat by the relocation of a cream cake factory bringing 700 jobs.
▪ At your workplace you find that it is somebody's birthday and they treat everyone to a cream cake.
▪ And finally the Danube dances past Vienna, home of the waltz, great composers and superb cream cakes!
hot
▪ All the rage, she says, selling like hot cakes.
▪ If you are having hot cakes, also order hash browns.
▪ Opren was selling like hot cakes.
▪ Sirloin Stockade has a great dessert item -- hot fudge cake -- which is an undercooked brownie-like substance saturated with fudge sauce.
▪ It should sell like hot cakes if I knock it into the right sort of shape.
▪ Cards depicting Santa in horribly compromising positions are selling like hot cakes.
▪ It smelled of hot cake rising in the oven.
▪ The thing which put Sunday tea apart from that of the rest of the week was the lovely hot Wiltshire dough cake.
large
▪ A nearby tray was furnished with a mug and a large plate scattered with the crumbs of a large slice of cake.
▪ Form into 10 large crab cakes.
▪ Cut a little off the wide base of the large cake so that it will sit firmly as the domed body of the clown.
▪ Newspaper colleagues greeted Xi with a large cake on his arrival back in Hong Kong late Saturday night.
▪ They may believe that a smaller share of a larger cake is absolutely bigger than a larger share of a smaller cake.
▪ In his right hand was a large cake with jam on it.
▪ The cold buffet lunch, of high standard, included a large cake in the shape and colours of Searcher.
▪ Spread top of smaller cake with jam, invert on to larger cake and press down firmly.
round
▪ Early birthdays were preserved in snapshots: round cakes blazing in the blackness, her own clapped hands in the high chair.
▪ Shape the crawfish mixture into round cakes, approximately 2 ounces each.
▪ Almost at once she was back again staggering under the weight of an enormous round chocolate cake on a china platter.
▪ Cover the round cake with white icing.
▪ I have spent my entire holiday handing round cakes and business.
small
▪ Half fill the small basins with cake mixture and fill the large basin with the remainder.
▪ Cut the risen surfaces off the small cakes and sandwich these together with the marmalade to form the head.
▪ They may believe that a smaller share of a larger cake is absolutely bigger than a larger share of a smaller cake.
▪ Prices start at £3.75 for small gift cakes and £6.50 for large party versions.
▪ Then he had three small cakes and an apple.
▪ Spread top of smaller cake with jam, invert on to larger cake and press down firmly.
▪ Spread rest of smaller cake with jam and cover with remaining marzipan, as before.
▪ The whole of East-West trade is at present only a small piece of a small slice of a rather small cake.
■ NOUN
birthday
▪ A willingness to learn and perseverance are much more important than candles on a birthday cake.
▪ The Poole family, grouped rather self-consciously round the birthday cake on Earth, lapsed into a sudden silence.
▪ Dot had made Eth a birthday cake with 15 candles, which happened to be her age when they met.
▪ Were birthday cakes, wishbones, wells and fountains, or churches better than or equal to stars?
▪ In part two: A slice of history.The birthday cake that was sheer folly.
▪ Vivid memories of her childhood holidays go on and on about birthday cakes, pumpkin pies, fruitcakes, and homemade candy.
▪ A big birthday cake came out for Sandra with eighteen candles which she ceremoniously blew out.
▪ It's a birthday cake for you Duncan.
crab
▪ Guests began with crab cakes, caviar, creme fraiche, smoked salmon and mini beef wellingtons.
▪ Form into 10 large crab cakes.
▪ I am having a blast, as I crunch on crab cakes with jicama slaw and lemon chive aioli.
▪ Baltimore Mayor Kurt Schmoke is putting up a crab cake dinner, and a tour of Baltimore.
▪ The happy hour food menu includes hot wings, chicken quesadillas, onion rings and crab cakes, among others.
▪ Pan-fried Louisiana crab cakes with remoulade sauce and Cobb salad with creamy tarragon sauce are perennial lunchtime favorites.
madeira
▪ Uncooked madeira cake mixture can be frozen in an airtight container.
mix
▪ It wasn't as splashy as water - it was sort of like cake mix.
▪ In a large mixing bowl combine cake mix and pudding.
▪ Christmas tree cake rack Miniature trees on a rack for sponge cake mixes and jellies.
▪ Stir nuts and water into remaining cake mix mixture, then sprinkle over filling.
mixture
▪ Uncooked madeira cake mixture can be frozen in an airtight container.
▪ You may want to measure it from the top of the pan to the cake mixture.
▪ Half fill the small basins with cake mixture and fill the large basin with the remainder.
▪ Léonie went on licking the cake mixture out of the bowl.
▪ Divide the cake mixture between the cans and place on a greased baking tray.
▪ The octopus body is made from a tubular cake, achieved by baking cake mixture in an empty food can.
▪ Spread half the cake mixture into a greased and lined cake tin.
▪ Divide the cake mixture between them.
pan
▪ The Clown and Doll cake pans come with two icing bags and nozzles.
▪ Press into greased 10-by-13-inch cake pan.
▪ Grease two 9-inch layer-cake pans, line bottoms with wax paper and grease paper.
▪ Oil a 9-by-1 2-inch cake pan and pour polenta into it.
▪ Grease and flour two cake pans.
▪ If you decide to use a tube pan instead of a cake pan, it may take 10 minutes more to bake.
▪ Butter and dust with flour a 10-inch cake pan. 2.
potato
▪ Slide the potato cake from the pan on to a plate.
pound
▪ His plate held the last few crumbs of a generous slice of pound cake.
▪ She made potato salad and deviled eggs and tea and I brought green beans and a pound cake.
▪ After ripening, use as a topping for pudding, pound cake or ice cream.
▪ She had been in the midst of baking a pound cake and it had come out too heavy.
▪ I got a pound cake from Patience mailed in September.
▪ He puts butter on already buttery things like croissants and pound cake.
recipe
▪ This has to be one of the easiest-to-make Christmas cake recipes ever.
▪ Many cake recipes call for all-purpose flour, but those that suggest cake flour do so for a reason.
rice
▪ From top, Smoked salmon rolls with pesto rice, Christmas jewel basmati salad, Basmati rice cake.
▪ In celebration of a new weight control year, the Quaker Oats Co. has developed yet another rice cake flavor.
▪ Lunch Rice cakes, low-fat cheese, tomatoes and onion, apple.
▪ Basmati rice cake Serves 6-8 1 Boil the rice for 3 minutes in water, then drain.
▪ Deep-fried glutinous rice cakes Glutinous rice is sweet and its sticky texture makes it easy to mould.
seed
▪ He'd like Mrs Peters and her seed cake.
sponge
▪ Foodstuff varies from fried egg and chips to sausage rolls and sponge cakes.
▪ Brush the glaze while still hot over a fruit cake, but allow to cool slightly before spreading over a sponge cake.
▪ It was rising like a sponge cake.
▪ Both are light sponge cakes with jam and vanilla filling, decorated with soft fondant icing.
▪ Desmond's wife brought them tea and a sponge cake that was still warm.
▪ Card magic cake Buy some regular sponge cake from a local store.
▪ They lay within the cracked rocks like the jam in a crazy sponge cake.
▪ Use the following techniques for lining tins for quick and madeira sponge cakes, and for fruit cakes.
tin
▪ Victorine balanced the cake tin on the palm of her outstretched hand and frowned at it.
▪ She lifts a cake tin out of her tote bag.
▪ Pour into a 7in round cake tin. 2.
▪ Fold in the lemon juice and zest. 4 Pour into the prepared cake tin and smooth the top level.
▪ There are plenty of cake tins in this month's equipment feature on page 68 to inspire creative cake baking.
▪ I've got all her cake tins and her chopping board, which still smells very evocatively of her wonderful Wienerschnitzel.
▪ There were a number of cake tins and Melanie opened one and found last night's currant cake.
▪ Spread half the cake mixture into a greased and lined cake tin.
wedding
▪ The final chapter - on whither the wedding cake - had this reviewer in helpless stitches.
▪ Encrusted with statues, pillars, and reliefs, it looks like a huge wedding cake in stone.
▪ Everybody saved all their food coupons for the wedding cake.
▪ We all eat wedding cakes from Gisella Tect.
▪ The white pony comes complete with veil, wedding cake, wedding ring, comb and ribbon, for perfect grooming!
▪ But this is no ordinary wedding cake - it's a knitted one!
▪ Three sides of the Piazza were bordered by arched colonnades, tiers upon tiers of them, like a massive wedding cake.
▪ And to round it off their was a tiered wedding cake - all provided by Mrs White.
■ VERB
bake
▪ It can be found in baking a cake, pruning a tree, or holding a children's party.
▪ Explanation Both baking powder and baking soda are used in baking cakes and some breads.
▪ They were baked in bread, cakes and buns and crushed to make juice.
▪ They put up streamers and got hats and baked a couple of cakes.
▪ Pat Bateson's analogy is to consider baking a cake.
▪ A black family moves in - the neighbours bake them a cake.
▪ She can bake wonderful cakes full of wildflowers, but she never quite finds the sweetness she craves.
bring
▪ This time, Eleanor had brought a cake of her own - she was good at making them.
▪ They brought boxes of moon cakes and swallows' nests and bags of lotus seeds.
▪ This time she had brought him an almond cake and some chocolate.
▪ Jessica often rewarded Dutsch for his friendliness by bringing him cookies and cakes.
buy
▪ If he hadn't eaten it, I would have bought the cake at the auction and got rid of it.
▪ They were buying Eccles cakes and treacle tart and currant buns and iced tarts with bright-red cherries on top.
▪ Card magic cake Buy some regular sponge cake from a local store.
▪ For a treat for myself I'd occasionally buy a cream cake.
▪ You can buy wonderful cakes and not have to bake them.
▪ They saw Commander Abigail, with his rolled-up towel and bathing-trunks under his arm, buying cake from Mrs Stead-Carter.
▪ Next door to that I could buy carrot cake ice-cream.
cover
▪ Use to cover the cake, smoothing around the sides and over the cake drum.
▪ Roll out marzipan to a round large enough to cover the cake.
▪ In this country you cover the cake with poisoned icing.
▪ Trim off excess icing around the base. Cover the round cake with white icing.
▪ It is mainly used for modelling, but can also be used for covering cakes.
▪ Use some red icing to cover the smallest cake and place on top of the green and white parcels.
cut
▪ Holding firm with one hand, cut and shape the cake as illustrated.
▪ He had short-cropped hair and a jawline lean and sharp enough to cut cake.
▪ Some of the world's most beautiful women have also cut more birthday cakes than Clinton.
▪ Retirement celebrations and cut into their retirement cake.
▪ Alistair Gentleman and Bob Bomont cut the celebration cake.
▪ How to cut the cake is yet to be resolved.
▪ The proceedings were opened by Fiona Richmond who cut the celebration cake and presented the raffle prized.
▪ Leave to dry. 4 Cut the cake in half vertically.
cutting
▪ He is shown, composed after the initial welcome shock, cutting his specially made cake.
▪ He directed them in blowing out the candles and cutting the cake.
▪ Cell divisions cleave the egg, like cutting a cake, and result in a multicellular structure.
▪ Children often use dough in imitation of pastry; rolling, cutting and making cakes, pies or pasties.
▪ He and his brother would take delight in cutting out oat cakes.
eat
▪ The small boy ate ten griddle cakes and the man eight.
▪ I go to wine bars, I eat carrot cake.
▪ Then he ate one-third of a cake, leaving one-sixth unaccounted for.
▪ There was a time, a generation or two back, when it was fashionable to eat bits of cake yeast.
▪ The audience sat in a warm honey glow, drinking tea and eating richly iced cake.
▪ And for the rest of the morning on into early afternoon, HsingHsing eats cake and bamboo and carrots and gruel.
▪ It also lets feminist psychologists have and eat their methodological cake.
▪ So I said my line, which was: Who ate the Easter cake?
ice
▪ We pay him to put icing on the cake, and tie him to us.
▪ The background is icing on the cake.
▪ Greening had a day not with just icing on the cake, but with lashings of clotted cream too.
▪ But within that reddish brown icing on the white cake, you can see the neurons arranged into a half-dozen layers.
▪ Although an extra £50, this really was the icing on the cake of a fabulous week.
▪ The prospects of a change in government banking policy has been the icing on the cake.
▪ A year ago, Holiday Inn put the icing on the cake at two of its Florida properties.
make
▪ Gran did that, you know, as usual, and she made the cake and I've iced it.
▪ You can make this cake at home.
▪ In her spare time she makes and decorates cakes of different shapes and sizes for all occasions.
▪ This extends to not allowing your children to lick the egg beaters after making a cake if you used fresh eggs.
▪ When the cake is cool, slice it across with a large knife to make two cakes.
▪ Reading a cookery book about how to make a cake is very different from the actual doing of it.
▪ She took up the pastime after impressing friends and family when she made an engagement cake for her brother-in-law.
place
▪ Trim the top of one cake flat and place the other cake on top of it.
▪ Spread a little buttercream over the centre of the marzipan circle and place the second cake on top of this.
▪ Another possibility is to place two rectangular cakes together to make a football pitch.
sell
▪ All the rage, she says, selling like hot cakes.
▪ They didn't sell many cakes.
▪ There are stalls selling sweets, cakes, espetada and wine.
▪ Mrs Stead-Carter had sold her cakes and was hurrying between the kitchen and the tea-tables.
▪ But it's all we do we don't even sell cake decorations or equipment.
▪ Cafes sell cakes made without sugar.
▪ Opren was selling like hot cakes.
▪ It should sell like hot cakes if I knock it into the right sort of shape.
serve
▪ Canned salmon sold at eleven cents a can, and Aunt Pat splurged now and then and served fried salmon cakes.
▪ A slave was serving Jehana with sweet cakes on a tray.
▪ They had served a cake, so big you could walk inside it, shaped like an igloo.
▪ A Tea Garden, serving home made cakes, is set in one of the walled gardens.
▪ A snack bar serves tea and cakes.
slice
▪ In my dream, I am slicing a cake with Mary Wollstonecraft.
▪ Mter slicing the cake for the cameramen, he will step to the microphones for his usual birthday observations.
wed
▪ It is now a tawdry tourist symbol, an elaborately frosted wedding-cake up which climbing companies yo-yo hundreds of clients.
▪ We cut the enormous multilayered white wedding cake without incident and toasted our marriage with champagne.
▪ He walked past the jewelry shops, every bakery window with a pink-and-white wedding cake.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be a piece of cake
▪ But there is no use pretending the Saturn-Pluto effect will be a piece of cake.
▪ Glacier walking is a piece of cake; well this bit was, with rolling hills of dazzling serenity.
▪ My bone marrow was harvested a couple of weeks ago and the whole thing was a piece of cake.
▪ Normally, walking along tarmac is a piece of cake after the rocky excursion along a ridge.
▪ Should be a piece of cake.
▪ That was a piece of cake compared to finding a square mile without an ad.
▪ The one he was allocated, Parky, a homely, Hoomey-sized bay, was a piece of cake compared with Bones.
be selling/going like hot cakes
sell like hot cakes
slab of cake/chocolate/meat etc
▪ Ahead of him a morose-looking man in a cardigan was sorting through slabs of meat in plastic containers.
▪ One of the occupied tables contained a man and woman and child, tucking in to great slabs of meat.
▪ She simply looks satisfied, as if she had just bitten into the most delicious slab of chocolate she ever tasted.
the icing on the cake
▪ A year ago, Holiday Inn put the icing on the cake at two of its Florida properties.
▪ And for the family business with such humble beginnings the expansion is just the icing on the cake.
▪ And just to put the icing on the cake he has named it Black Forest Chateau.
▪ Female speaker It's an added bonus, the icing on the cake.
▪ I would also endorse heartily our bikes, which provided the icing on the cake.
▪ Items such as these are the icing on the cake.
▪ The prospects of a change in government banking policy has been the icing on the cake.
▪ This is just the icing on the cake.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a birthday cake
▪ Do you want a piece of cake?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A plastic Santa was sledging across the snow-white surface of a cake.
▪ Each of us receives a slice of heavenly chocolate cake.
▪ From top, Smoked salmon rolls with pesto rice, Christmas jewel basmati salad, Basmati rice cake.
▪ Many cake recipes call for all-purpose flour, but those that suggest cake flour do so for a reason.
▪ Noreen, frankly, wanted her cake and to eat it as well.
▪ Pour into greased and floured 9-by-13-inch cake pan.
▪ She would have been on the floor for those pastries, and after the chocolate cake.
▪ When the cake is cool, slice it across with a large knife to make two cakes.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
blood
▪ The cloth was caked with her blood.
▪ His eyes opened and he saw his finger caked with blood.
▪ My trousers were caked with blood.
▪ On Jan. 9, officials confiscated a large residential dumpster caked with dried blood on the inner sides and bottom.
▪ Despite the caked blood and the chalky bruised skin I recognised the victim.
▪ Later, I helped her sponge off the caked blood.
mud
▪ The hand was caked in mud, the fingers hooked into a claw.
▪ The left side of her face is caked with bloodied mud.
▪ She took the can in her gloved hand, which was caked in black mud.
▪ At noon, Ron Malcolm appeared at the door, wearing boots caked with dried mud and a red baseball cap.
▪ His boots were still caked with mud, but they could wait.
▪ Bodies caked in mud, the rescuers gather for a debriefing session; up sound.
rice
▪ My husband and the minister wives who come to the party do not care for the rice cake.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be a piece of cake
▪ But there is no use pretending the Saturn-Pluto effect will be a piece of cake.
▪ Glacier walking is a piece of cake; well this bit was, with rolling hills of dazzling serenity.
▪ My bone marrow was harvested a couple of weeks ago and the whole thing was a piece of cake.
▪ Normally, walking along tarmac is a piece of cake after the rocky excursion along a ridge.
▪ Should be a piece of cake.
▪ That was a piece of cake compared to finding a square mile without an ad.
▪ The one he was allocated, Parky, a homely, Hoomey-sized bay, was a piece of cake compared with Bones.
be selling/going like hot cakes
slab of cake/chocolate/meat etc
▪ Ahead of him a morose-looking man in a cardigan was sorting through slabs of meat in plastic containers.
▪ One of the occupied tables contained a man and woman and child, tucking in to great slabs of meat.
▪ She simply looks satisfied, as if she had just bitten into the most delicious slab of chocolate she ever tasted.
the icing on the cake
▪ A year ago, Holiday Inn put the icing on the cake at two of its Florida properties.
▪ And for the family business with such humble beginnings the expansion is just the icing on the cake.
▪ And just to put the icing on the cake he has named it Black Forest Chateau.
▪ Female speaker It's an added bonus, the icing on the cake.
▪ I would also endorse heartily our bikes, which provided the icing on the cake.
▪ Items such as these are the icing on the cake.
▪ The prospects of a change in government banking policy has been the icing on the cake.
▪ This is just the icing on the cake.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ His plimsolls were now caked in heavy clods of wet earth and his jersey was already wet from his soaked mackintosh.
▪ It was caked with dirt, but he slipped it on anyway.
▪ The hand was caked in mud, the fingers hooked into a claw.
▪ Their lashes would be heavily caked whereas the newcomers were fearful of the technique at first.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Cake

Cake \Cake\ (k[=a]k), n. [OE. cake, kaak; akin to Dan. kage, Sw. & Icel. kaka, D. koek, G.kuchen, OHG. chuocho.]

  1. A small mass of dough baked; especially, a thin loaf from unleavened dough; as, an oatmeal cake; johnnycake.

  2. A sweetened composition of flour and other ingredients, leavened or unleavened, baked in a loaf or mass of any size or shape.

  3. A thin wafer-shaped mass of fried batter; a griddlecake or pancake; as buckwheat cakes.

  4. A mass of matter concreted, congealed, or molded into a solid mass of any form, esp. into a form rather flat than high; as, a cake of soap; an ague cake.

    Cakes of rusting ice come rolling down the flood.
    --Dryden.

    Cake urchin (Zo["o]l), any species of flat sea urchins belonging to the Clypeastroidea.

    Oil cake the refuse of flax seed, cotton seed, or other vegetable substance from which oil has been expressed, compacted into a solid mass, and used as food for cattle, for manure, or for other purposes.

    To have one's cake dough, to fail or be disappointed in what one has undertaken or expected.
    --Shak.

Cake

Cake \Cake\, v. i. To form into a cake, or mass.

Cake

Cake \Cake\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Caked; p. pr. & vb. n. Caking.] To concrete or consolidate into a hard mass, as dough in an oven; to coagulate.

Clotted blood that caked within.
--Addison.

Cake

Cake \Cake\, v. i. To cackle as a goose. [Prov. Eng.]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
cake

early 13c., from Old Norse kaka "cake," from West Germanic *kokon- (cognates: Middle Dutch koke, Dutch koek, Old High German huohho, German Kuchen). Not now believed to be related to Latin coquere "to cook," as formerly supposed. Replaced its Old English cognate, coecel.\nWhat man, I trow ye raue, Wolde ye bothe eate your cake and haue your cake? ["The Proverbs & Epigrams of John Heywood," 1562]\nOriginally (until early 15c.) "a flat, round loaf of bread." Piece of cake "something easy" is from 1936. The let them eat cake story is found in Rousseau's "Confessions," in reference to an incident c.1740, long before Marie Antoinette, though it has been associated with her since c.1870; it apparently was a chestnut in the French royal family that had been told of other princesses and queens before her.

cake

c.1600, from cake (n.). Related: Caked; caking.

Wiktionary
cake

Etymology 1 n. 1 A rich, sweet dessert food, typically made of flour, sugar(,) and eggs and baked in an oven, and often covered in icing. 2 A small mass of baked dough, especially a thin loaf from unleavened dough. 3 A thin wafer-shaped mass of fried batter; a griddlecake or pancake. 4 A block of any of various dense materials. 5 (context slang English) A trivially easy task or responsibility; from '''a piece of cake'''. 6 (context slang English) money. vb. 1 (context transitive English) coat (something) with a crust of solid material. 2 To form into a cake, or mass. Etymology 2

vb. (context UK dialect obsolete intransitive English) To cackle like a goose.

WordNet
cake
  1. n. a block of solid substance (such as soap or wax); "a bar of chocolate" [syn: bar]

  2. small flat mass of chopped food [syn: patty]

  3. made from or based on a mixture of flour and sugar and eggs

  4. v. form a coat over; "Dirt had coated her face" [syn: coat]

Wikipedia
Cake

Cake is a form of sweet dessert that is typically baked. In its oldest forms, cakes were modifications of breads but now cover a wide range of preparations that can be simple or elaborate and share features with other desserts such as pastries, meringues, custards and pies.

Typical cake ingredients are flour, sugar, eggs, butter or oil, a liquid, and leavening agents, such as baking soda and/or baking powder. Common additional ingredients and flavourings include dried, candied or fresh fruit, nuts, cocoa, and extracts such as vanilla, with numerous substitutions for the primary ingredients. Cakes can also be filled with fruit preserves or dessert sauces (like pastry cream), iced with buttercream or other icings, and decorated with marzipan, piped borders, or candied fruit.

Cake is often served as a celebratory dish on ceremonial occasions, for example weddings, anniversaries, and birthdays. There are countless cake recipes; some are bread-like, some rich and elaborate, and many are centuries old. Cake making is no longer a complicated procedure; while at one time considerable labor went into cake making (particularly the whisking of egg foams), baking equipment and directions have been simplified so that even the most amateur cook may bake a cake.

Cake (disambiguation)

A cake is a sweet, baked form of food.

Cake may also refer to:

Cake (2005 film)

Cake is a 2005 romantic comedy film directed by Nisha Ganatra.

Cake (album)

Cake is the debut studio album by Scottish pop/rock band, The Trash Can Sinatras.

Cake (2014 film)

Cake is a 2014 American drama film written by Patrick Tobin, directed by Daniel Barnz, and starring Jennifer Aniston, Adriana Barraza, Felicity Huffman, William H. Macy, Anna Kendrick, and Sam Worthington. It debuted in the Special Presentations section of the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival.

Aniston's performance received strong praise and earned her nominations for the Screen Actors Guild Award and Golden Globe Award.

Cake (band)

Cake (stylized CAKE) is an American alternative rock band from Sacramento, California. Consisting of singer John McCrea, trumpeter Vince DiFiore, guitarist Xan McCurdy, bassist Gabe Nelson and drummer Paulo Baldi, the band has been noted for McCrea's sarcastic lyrics and monotone vocals, DiFiore's trumpet parts, and their wide-ranging musical influences, including country music, Mariachi, rock, funk, Iranian folk music and hip hop.

Cake was formed in 1991 by McCrea, DiFiore, Greg Brown, Frank French and Shon Meckfessel, who soon left and was replaced by Nelson. Following the self-release of its debut album, Motorcade of Generosity, the band was signed to Capricorn Records in 1995 and released its first single, " Rock 'n' Roll Lifestyle", which hit number 35 on the Modern Rock Tracks music chart and was featured on MTV's 120 Minutes; French and Nelson then left the band, and were replaced by Todd Roper and Victor Damiani. Cake's second album, 1996's Fashion Nugget, went platinum on the strength of its lead single, " The Distance". Following a tour of Europe and the United States, both Brown and Damiani announced they were leaving Cake, which led to speculation about the band's future; McCrea eventually recruited Xan McCurdy to take over on guitar, and persuaded Nelson to return.

Prolonging the Magic, the band's third album, was released in 1998 and went platinum, having shipped over one million units; this was followed three years later by Comfort Eagle, the band's first album on Columbia Records, featuring the single " Short Skirt/Long Jacket" which hit number 7 on the Modern Rock Tracks chart. Following a series of tours, including several versions of the Unlimited Sunshine Tour, the band released Pressure Chief in 2004, its second and last album on Columbia. After creating its own label, Upbeat Records, the band released Showroom of Compassion in 2011, which became its first album to debut at the top of the Billboard charts, selling 44,000 copies in the first week after release.

Cake (firework)

A cake firework, also known as a multiple tube device is a firework comprising a series of Roman candles, small aerial shells, or a combination of both, connected together by a high-speed fuse. Typically, the internal fusing is set to fire each tube in series, or to fire several tubes at the same time, or a combination of these. Typically a cake will resemble from the outside a simple cube or other rectangular covered shape; after firing, a large number of cardboard tubes (the candles) will be visible in the top of the firework (the paper cover having been blown off by the discharging stars). In a traditional cake, all the candles point upwards; a variant is called the fan or angle cake.

Cakes are one of the most popular types of firework, as they can create spectacular and long-lasting effects from a single ignition while minimising safety concern. In the UK, the reclassification of aerial shells to Category 4 has popularised cakes as a method for achieving similar effects while staying within safety guidelines, particularly by firing multiple candles at the same time.

Cakes vary greatly in size, weight and duration. Some last only a few seconds and contain only a few tubes, while others may last for several minutes, contain upwards of 1,000 tubes, and measure over a cubic yard in size. Large "finale Cakes" containing dozens of shells up to 4" diameter are not uncommon, and some cakes, particularly those containing large amounts of dragon's eggs, can weigh over 100 pounds prior to discharge.

Cake (TV series)

Cake (or Cake TV) was a sitcom and How-to television series that originally aired on the KOL's Secret Slumber Party and KEWLopolis lineup on CBS. The show was broadcast from September 16, 2006 to December 9, 2006 in its first run and was broadcast from December 16, 2006 to September 12, 2009 in reruns only. The show was produced by DIC Entertainment in association with Brookwell McNamara Entertainment ( Sean McNamara & David Brookwell).

Only 13 episodes of this series were produced; In 2007, when asked about the show, series producer and writer Susie Singer Carter said that the show was in its second season. But although those season two episodes never aired (if it was produced at all), it is assumed that at this point the series has ended its run. On September 19, 2009, Cake was officially removed from the CBS lineup.

Cake (advertisement)

Cake is a television and cinema advertisement launched in 2007 by Škoda Auto to promote the new second-generation Fabia supermini car in the United Kingdom. The 60-second spot forms the centrepiece of an integrated advertising campaign comprising appearances on television, in cinemas, in newspapers and magazines, online, and through direct marketing. The campaign and its component parts were handled by the London branch of advertising agency Fallon Worldwide. Cake was directed by British director Chris Palmer. Production was contracted to Gorgeous Enterprises, with sound handled by Wave Studios. It premiered on British television on 17 May 2007.

The campaign was a critical, popular, and financial success. It has been credited for the significant improvements in awareness and public opinion of the brand, and received honours from a number of advertising festivals and awards ceremonies, including several from the British Television Advertising Awards, the Cannes Lions International Advertising Festival, and the Creative Circle Awards.

A "meaner" version of the advert was made to promote the vRS model of the Fabia.

Usage examples of "cake".

The acridity of its oil is modified in the seeds by combination with another fixed oil of a bland nature which can be readily separated by pressure, then the cake left after the expression of this fixed oil is far more pungent than the seeds.

Lynn Flewelling Seregil must have been generous, Alec thought as she piled his trencher with plump sausages and oat porridge, then fetched a pitcher of milk and some hot ash cakes to go with it.

Fairly rose, indicating that Lars Aquavit and Annette should grab their cake plates and join her for their dessert in the kitchen.

And beside this can Jean would find, every day, something particular,--a blossom of the red geranium that bloomed in the farmhouse window, a piece of cake with plums in it, a bunch of trailing arbutus,--once it was a little bit of blue ribbon, tied in a certain square knot--so--perhaps you know that sign too?

Then the gas is turned on, with supernumerary argand lamps and manifold waxlights, to illuminate countless cakes, of all prices and dimensions, that stand in rows and piles on the counters and sideboards, and in the windows.

Then he had Samae serve them tea and cakes while they watched the guards strike the camp, everything but the awning and the carpet under which the two sat.

The man with all the pots and pans on his bicycle, the nun eating the baguette as she trundles along, the old woman shooing the geese, the businessman in his car eating a cake and attempting to look important.

I can have my cake and eat it too, you know, in regards to not bailing on Ruby.

Lombro had walked up to Ralph Bales and, as the children were cutting the cake, struck up a conversation.

Becca managed the julienne soup, but the whole steamed salmon, served with lobster cakes and cucumbers bechamel, was quite another matter.

When Osman and al-Noor reached his double storeyed house in the south quarter, which lay between the Beit el Mai, the treasury, and the slave market, dawn was breaking and a dozen of his aggagiers were sitting in the courtyard being fed by the house slaves a breakfast of honey-roasted lamb and dhurra cakes with steaming pots of syrupy black Abyssinian coffee.

I was saying to the Bibliomaniac this morning, your buckwheat cakes are, to my mind, the very highest development of our modern civilization, and to have even one of them wasted seems to me to be a crime against Nature herself, for which a second, third, or fourth shaking up of this earth would be an inadequate punishment.

There was no pipeclay here to be caked onto crossbelts and musket slings, no blackball to be used on boots and no grease and powder to be slathered on the hair.

Some cakes under a wire cover looked very nice, and just as Blinky was crawling along the shelf to try one, he caught sight of a tiny mouse peeping out of his hole.

She found the Boggles in the tea-room beside an empty coffee-pot and plates covered in cake crumbs.