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Buggy

Buggy may refer to:

  • horse and buggy, refers to a light, simple, two-person carriage of the late 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries, drawn usually by one or two horses
  • Buggy (automobile), the generalization of
    • Buggy body, early automobile body style
    • Dune buggy, a recreational vehicle with large wheels, and wide tires, designed for use on sand dunes, beaches, or desert recreation
      • Sandrail, a variant of the dune buggy
    • Kite buggy, a light, purpose-built vehicle powered by a traction kite (power kite)
    • Moon buggy
    • Swamp buggy, a vehicle used to traverse boggy swamp terrain
    • Truggy, truggie is a specialized off-road vehicle
  • Class of off-road radio-controlled cars
    • 1:10 radio-controlled off-road buggy
    • 1:8 radio-controlled off-road buggy
    • Large Scale Off-Road, typically 1:5 or 1:6 scale and historically 1:4 scale
  • Baby carriage, AKA a pushchair, perambulator, stroller or pram
  • Gravity racer, an unmotorised go-kart
  • Fire chief's vehicle, a car, truck, or SUV that is used by a fire chief at fire scenes
  • Buggy (surname)
  • Buggy the Clown, an antagonist in the One Piece manga/anime series
  • (obsolete) insane (as in "bugsy")
  • A U.S. nuclear test conducted under Operation Crosstie and Operation Plowshare.
  • Punch buggy, a car game generally played by children in which participants punch each other in the arm upon first sight of a Volkswagen Beetle

Buggy (automobile)

Buggy is generally used to refer to any lightweight automobile with off road capabilities and sparse bodywork. Most are built either as a kit car or from scratch.

Buggy (surname)

Buggy is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Hugh Buggy (1896–1974), Australian journalist
  • Ned Buggy (born 1948), Irish hurler
  • Niall Buggy (born 1948), Irish actor
  • Paddy Buggy (1929–2013), Irish hurler
  • Regina Buggy (born 1959), American field hockey player
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

buggy

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
baby buggy
dune buggy
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
baby
▪ People with baby buggies have to walk in the roadway and residents, I think, have to make a detour.
▪ Backache is a constant complaint as I stoop over low baths, sinks, baby buggies and shopping trolleys.
▪ He was in a baby buggy and beside him was holdall containing clothes, bottles and baby wipes.
▪ The tests offer for pushchairs and baby buggies comes from Cheshire's trading standards service as part of National Consumer Week.
dune
▪ Others roared over the sands in newly-designed Land Rovers, on revolutionary dune buggies and motor bikes.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And his electrically-powered Sungift 400 buggy was nearly blown over every time a juggernaut roared by.
▪ And never be too proud to be seen riding in a little buggy like this, instead of a limousine.
▪ Both Head Huggers can be used in buggies, bouncing cradles and baby carriers too.
▪ He was found beneath his buggy.
▪ Others roared over the sands in newly-designed Land Rovers, on revolutionary dune buggies and motor bikes.
▪ People appeared and thickened-walkers, riders, drivers of buggies and wagons.
▪ Rescue teams used everything from golf buggies to a sea king helicopter to search the area adjoining the golf course.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Buggy

Buggy \Bug"gy\, a. [From Bug.] Infested or abounding with bugs.

Buggy

Buggy \Bug"gy\, n.; pl. Buggies.

  1. A light one horse two-wheeled vehicle. [Eng.]

    Villebeck prevailed upon Flora to drive with him to the race in a buggy.
    --Beaconsfield.

  2. A light, four-wheeled vehicle, usually with one seat, and with or without a calash top. [U.S.]

    Buggy cultivator, a cultivator with a seat for the driver.

    Buggy plow, a plow, or set of plows, having a seat for the driver; -- called also sulky plow.

WordNet

buggy

  1. adj. informal or slang terms for mentally irregular; "it used to drive my husband balmy" [syn: balmy, barmy, bats, batty, bonkers, cracked, crackers, daft, dotty, fruity, haywire, kooky, kookie, loco, loony, loopy, nuts, nutty, round the bend, around the bend, wacky, whacky]

  2. infested with bugs

  3. n. a small lightweight carriage; drawn by a single horse [syn: roadster]

  4. [also: buggiest, buggier]

Wiktionary

buggy

a. 1 Infested with insects 2 (context computing English) Containing programming errors 3 Resembling an insect n. A small horse-drawn cart.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

buggy

"light carriage," 1773, of unknown origin. Extended to baby carriages by 1890.

buggy

"infested with bugs," 1774, from bug (n.) + -y (2).

Usage examples of "buggy".

However, a friendly yokel gave me a lift out to Billabong in a very dirty and springless buggy, so that the mistake was not a fatal one, though it gave me a very uncomfortable drive.

Bongo do but reach into a baby buggy which a Mama is pushing past on the sidewalk on the Garden side of the street, and snatch out a baby, though what Bongo wants with this baby nobody knows to this day.

A good many roads have been made in the State, and the Chinese are building buggies, gharries, and wagons, and many of the richer ones own them and import Sumatra ponies to draw them.

As the dune buggy lurched forward, Org gave a yelp, his eyes as wide as saucers.

Staggering to where Org lay, Zeb lifted the small dog and carried it to the dune buggy.

There were people on Jet Skis and old Everglades swamp buggies and even battered tourist pedalos, many of them laden with stuff.

And as I sez this, Josiah turned and almost flew down the steps and into the buggy.

Some day I might be flashing past in a buggy or saloon-carriage--or, the chances are it will be you--and you might look out the window and see an old swaggy tramping along in the dust, or camped under a strip of calico in the rain in the scrub.

Children in buggies were pushed up the hill to Hempstead Heath to picnic in the yellowing grass or catch tiddlers in Whitestone Pond.

The minute the buggy and its accompanying band of riders left the boundary of the Triple C land to make the ride into town, Webb was confronted by the changes less than one year had brought.

Pieces of his remarks drifted to Webb as he helped Ruth out of the buggy, enough for him to get the gist of it.

I felt that though some comforted and edified by his talk, still, my heart was not there, not there in that double buggy with 2 seats, but wuz afur off with my pardner.

There had been no Carl Brego, no Lisa Dissat trying to be Mary Broll, no Lisa Dissat striding angrily away from me in the hot, buggy night.

When they pass the Catholic church, Tress gives her a poke because they are in the exact spot where Mamo crosses herself every time she goes past in the buggy.

There had been light snow that night, but Renner could still make out their snow buggy tracks in places.