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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

brew

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a storm is brewing (=is likely to start soon)
▪ He could feel that a storm was brewing.
home brew
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
up
▪ His face was like something brewed up out of spit and bile.
▪ At lunchtime, when everyone was brewing up, the navigator plotted all those little legs on to a map.
▪ In 1983, microbiologist Julian Adams dis-covered a clue when he brewed up a soup of cloned E. coli bacteria.
▪ The Hot Pot can not fire this turn and may not fire next turn while a fresh pot is brewed up.
▪ I think it's as well I did, especially in view of what's brewing up now.
▪ And he's hoping to brew up a shock for his old mates tonight.
▪ Barry Jones boiled over when he saw 63-year-old Vera brewing up for a local hospice on her day off.
■ NOUN
beer
▪ The Technical Committee looks at all aspects of brewing and serving beer.
▪ It monitors new developments in brewing and serving beer.
▪ A sign over the door proclaimed that the hostelry still brewed its own beer.
▪ If a woman brewed a better beer than her neighbours her house became the favoured one in the locality - the local.
▪ Those who wished to brew beer for their own household could use the abbey brewery - again upon a proportional payment.
▪ They brew as much beer in a day, as Morland produce at Abingdon in a week.
coffee
▪ One of us made a fire and we brewed coffee and lay in the autumn sun.
▪ The burning wood takes the edge off the morning cold, and it helps brew our coffee.
▪ The pudding went down like a dream, in blessed silence, and Christopher and Francis disappeared to brew coffee.
▪ Company also sells tea cups and pots as well as baked goods and brewed coffee.
▪ Back indoors, she brewed coffee and ate a hasty breakfast before settling down to work.
Coffee brewed from ground coffee beans costs more than coffee made from an instant product.
▪ She got up, brewed a pot of coffee, went to her study and started work.
▪ While she went to brew coffee Fletcher introduced Patrick and Chris to the man who had been waiting in the sitting room.
pot
▪ She let herself in and ministered to their needs, brewing a pot of tea and lighting a good fire.
▪ After the game, Hicks would brew a pot of verbena tea and turn in early.
▪ She got up, brewed a pot of coffee, went to her study and started work.
▪ My next step will be to brew us a pot of chrysanthemum tea.
▪ It was ten o'clock; she brewed a pot of tea and made one more effort to contact Harris.
▪ We say nothing while she brews herself a pot of cherry almond.
storm
▪ All morning it has been calm but now we are threatened by a storm that has been brewing out to the west.
▪ It just munches grass, unaware of the ethical storm brewing around it.
tea
▪ She let herself in and ministered to their needs, brewing a pot of tea and lighting a good fire.
▪ The extract from an herb can be either brewed in a tea or taken directly into the mouth.
▪ It was ten o'clock; she brewed a pot of tea and made one more effort to contact Harris.
▪ Edusha brewed tea, putting herring roe, cheese, and butter on the table.
▪ They would sit in the lavatories and brew up tea in a can by holding a candle underneath.
▪ I brewed tea and drank it.
▪ Having eaten it, he brewed some tea and took her a cup.
▪ Edusha brewed some tea and found half a loaf of bread, some butter and cheese.
trouble
▪ But trouble is brewing for the present Lord Mayor.
▪ The message was clear: Atmospheric trouble was brewing.
▪ By then it was clear that fresh trouble was brewing in the Angoumois.
▪ What trouble is brewing with the excess carrier?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ An argument is brewing over the tax cuts.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Any wonder that there is a campaign-finance scandal brewing in Washington?
▪ Health-care bonds anywhere are risky these days, especially with changes brewing in Medicare and Medicaid.
▪ His face was like something brewed up out of spit and bile.
▪ My next step will be to brew us a pot of chrysanthemum tea.
▪ She let herself in and ministered to their needs, brewing a pot of tea and lighting a good fire.
▪ The pudding went down like a dream, in blessed silence, and Christopher and Francis disappeared to brew coffee.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
local
▪ For example, in beer advertisements there is a strong appeal to working class loyalty, often to particular, local brews.
potent
▪ Nationalism - from Prague to Paris, from Berlin to Budapest - is a potent, perilous brew.
▪ As for the potent brew itself, that won't be ready until Christmas.
■ NOUN
home
▪ The communion wafers and wine, have been replaced with a wholemeal loaf and a bottle of home brew.
▪ Before I put the home brew in them, I had an obsession to get the dirt out.
▪ It took three pints of home brew, each, before we stopped scratching.
▪ So will Geoff branch out with his home brew.
■ VERB
make
▪ He must have got enough Nescafé there to make brews for the whole of Frankfurt.
▪ Mary made her special brews to take the swelling down.
▪ Television, oil spills and dying animals make a strong political brew.
▪ Together the rumours and the snippets of information, the suspicions and the lies, make a pretty fearful brew.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A change into dry clothes before gearing up and a quick brew.
▪ As for the potent brew itself, that won't be ready until Christmas.
▪ Each brew master was a craftsman with a personalized understanding of how beer should taste.
▪ Earl Grey never seemed such a decent chap, and we laze back to enjoy his brew.
▪ In the days when most types of beer were dark, wheat brews were seen as being relatively pale and often cloudy.
▪ Off we went to a rickety bar in Sabinal Mextown and spent an hour sopping up the brew.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Brew

Brew \Brew\ (br[udd]), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Brewed (br[udd]d); p. pr. & vb. n. Brewing.] [OE. brewen, AS. bre['o]wan; akin to D. brouwen, OHG. priuwan, MHG. briuwen, br[=u]wen, G. brauen, Icel. brugga, Sw. brygga, Dan. brygge, and perh. to L. defrutum must boiled down, Gr. bry^ton (for fry^ton?) a kind of beer. The original meaning seems to have been to prepare by heat. [root]93. Cf. Broth, Bread.]

  1. To boil or seethe; to cook. [Obs.]

  2. To prepare, as beer or other liquor, from malt and hops, or from other materials, by steeping, boiling, and fermentation. ``She brews good ale.''
    --Shak.

  3. To prepare by steeping and mingling; to concoct.

    Go, brew me a pottle of sack finely.
    --Shak.

  4. To foment or prepare, as by brewing; to contrive; to plot; to concoct; to hatch; as, to brew mischief.

    Hence with thy brewed enchantments, foul deceiver!
    --Milton.

Brew

Brew \Brew\, v. i.

  1. To attend to the business, or go through the processes, of brewing or making beer.

    I wash, wring, brew, bake, scour.
    --Shak.

  2. To be in a state of preparation; to be mixing, forming, or gathering; as, a storm brews in the west.

    There is some ill a-brewing towards my rest.
    --Shak.

Brew

Brew \Brew\, n. The mixture formed by brewing; that which is brewed.
--Bacon.

Wikipedia

Brew

Brew may refer to:

Brew (horse)

Brew (foaled 1994 in New Zealand) is a small, plain bay Thoroughbred gelding who won the 2000 Melbourne Cup for trainer Mike Moroney and jockey Kerrin McEvoy. He carried the lightweight of 49.5 kilos and defeated the veteran Yippyio and the stablemate Second Coming. After finishing second to Yippyio in the Moonee Valley Cup, Brew qualified for the Melbourne Cup by winning The Dalgety on Derby Day, three days before the Cup. Brew was a son of the Sir Tristram and the champion New Zealand racemare and Japan Cup winner Horlicks but was gelded before showing his best form. The Melbourne Cup was Brew's last win.

Brew is now at Living Legends, the International Home of Rest for Champion Horses located in Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale, Victoria, Australia1.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

brew

Old English breowan "to brew" (class II strong verb, past tense breaw, past participle browen), from Proto-Germanic *breuwan "to brew" (cognates: Old Norse brugga, Old Frisian briuwa, Middle Dutch brouwen, Old High German briuwan, German brauen "to brew"), from PIE root *bhreuə- "to bubble, boil, effervesce" (cognates: Sanskrit bhurnih "violent, passionate," Greek phrear "well, spring, cistern," Latin fervere "to boil, foam," Thracian Greek brytos "fermented liquor made from barley," Russian bruja "current," Old Irish bruth "heat;" Old English beorma "yeast;" Old High German brato "roast meat"), the original sense thus being "make a drink by boiling." Related: Brewed; brewing.

brew

c.1500, "a brewed beverage," from brew (v.).

Wiktionary

brew

n. 1 The mixture formed by brewing; that which is brewed; a brewage. 2 (context slang English) A beer. 3 (context British NZ English) A cup of te

  1. 4 (context British NZ English) The act of making a cup of tea. 5 (context British informal English) A hill. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To prepare (usually a beverage) by steeping and mingle; to concoct. 2 (context transitive English) To foment or prepare, as by brewing; to contrive; to plot; to hatch. 3 (context intransitive English) To attend to the business, or go through the processes, of brewing or making beer. 4 (context intransitive English) To be in a state of preparation; to be mixing, forming, or gathering.

WordNet

brew

  1. n. drink made by steeping and boiling and fermenting rather than distilling [syn: brewage]

  2. v. prepare by brewing; "people have been brewing beer for thousands of years"

  3. sit or let sit in boiling water so as to extract the flavor; "the tea is brewing"

Usage examples of "brew".

The bartender glanced across the room at Muftak, muttered something under his breath, then grudgingly took the glass and refilled it with the ruby brew.

The air smelled of musky damp fur and baked scales, of nic-i-tain smoke, of space suits that had not been decontaminated in months, and of intoxicants from dozens of different worlds, Reegesk stepped to the bar, ordered a cup of Rydan brew from Wuher the bartender, and scanned the room for a likely customer.

And they teach the serpents there to entwine themselves up on long sticks out of the ground and of the scales of these serpents they brew out a brewage like to mead.

Of these one firm, namely, Messrs Guinness, owning the largest brewery in the world, brewed upwards of two million barrels, paying a sum of, roughly, one million sterling to the revenue.

The light beers in vogue to-day are less alcoholic, more lightly hopped, and more quickly brewed than the beers of the last generation, and in this respect are somewhat less stable and more likely to deteriorate than the latter were.

Mashing is, without a doubt, the most important of the brewing processes, for it is largely in the mash-tun that the character of the beer to be brewed is determined.

The sea-freshened air brought with it the fragrance of jasmine which bloomed alongside the veranda, mingled with the tantalizing aroma of hot, glazed meats, bread, brewed coffee, and tangy fresh fruits that graced the table for the morning meal and presented to Captain Beauchamp as he paused in the doorway a most heavenly scent after long months of sea fare.

The door slammed behind the obese man, and Dora scurried to fetch what Ruark had requested, setting out fruits, bread, and meats, while she brewed a pot of strong tea.

If there was trouble to be brewed, he was the master brewer, and he would see this mixture to its best fermentation.

For a bone-dry planet, Tatooine sure brewed some of the best beverages in the galaxy-expensive, but very tasty.

I got up and went to help Kennie repair the union, while Tom brewed a billy of tea over the fire.

Hule, and he felt a great need for the companionship of people of his own kind with whom he could be completely open, so he made his way directly through the forest to the more or less permanent encampment of a Hulish man named Nabjor who brewed good mead and sold it at a fair price.

He eventually came to the narrow crevice between two large standing boulders where Nabjor had brewed his mead.

Aejys crossed the room to her private liquor cabinet and took out her last two bottles of a rare Faery brewed wine, the best vintage she owned.

This tendency to centralize brewing operations became more and more marked with each succeeding decade.