Find the word definition

Crossword clues for brake

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
brake
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
air brakes
anti-lock braking system
brake fluid
brake light
brake shoe
coaster brake
disc brakes
emergency brake
parking brake
the stopping/braking distance (=how far you travel in a car after pressing the brakes)
▪ What’s the stopping distance at 30 miles an hour?
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
antilock
▪ Be gentle on brakes unless you have antilock brakes.
front
▪ The brakes consisted of two inefficient rear brakes and one transmission front brake, usually full of oil.
▪ As I rode away, I noticed that the front disc brake still faded erratically.
▪ He's now heavy on the front brake, while his right foot strokes the rear brake lever.
▪ The front brakes have three-pot calipers, while there's a two-pot caliper at the back.
▪ The car in front brakes, the car with the trailer doesn't.
▪ Stand by the bicycle, apply the front brake and try to push the bicycle forwards.
rear
▪ The brakes consisted of two inefficient rear brakes and one transmission front brake, usually full of oil.
▪ He's now heavy on the front brake, while his right foot strokes the rear brake lever.
▪ Do the test again with the rear brake.
■ NOUN
air
▪ One set of coaching stock has been converted to air brakes and is intended to be worked by this loco.
▪ The silence was broken occasionally by a muffled gasp or a quivering sigh that was more like the hiss of air brakes.
▪ As he pulled out, the blast of a horn howled behind him and a juggernaut's air brakes oozed violently.
disc
▪ As I rode away, I noticed that the front disc brake still faded erratically.
▪ Both the transmission controls are heavy, and the all-#disc brakes need a hefty shove despite their servo.
fluid
▪ If poor quality replacements have been fitted they may react with the brake fluid.
▪ She had to stoop again for the case, and so she caught sight of the pool of brake fluid at once.
hand
▪ The automatic vacuum brake was fitted in conjunction with a hand brake for the guard's use.
▪ The filler is on top of the box on a small square plate just in front of the hand brake drum.
▪ But things like hand brake levers and diff lock activators come in different places.
pedal
▪ The brake pedal is on the right, the accelerator in the middle.
▪ I found the brake pedal and the wheels locked.
▪ I suggest you check that your stop lights work when you press the brake pedal.
▪ He thought: we could have pressed the brake pedal.
▪ So even with the brake pedal to the floor on wet roads, you can still retain steering control.
▪ Chain your steering wheel to the clutch, brake pedal or a seat.
▪ The coach in front of Fenn's hired car came to a halt and he reluctantly eased his foot down on the brake pedal.
▪ The brake pedal likewise; when fitted with anti-lock brakes, pedal response is woefully mushy.
shoe
▪ There were brake shoes acting both on the wheels and on the track.
▪ The oil is getting into the wheel bearings and forcing grease past the oil seal and on to the brake shoes.
▪ Any two surfaces rubbing together produce frictional heat, such as a brake shoe pressing against a brake-drum.
■ VERB
act
▪ Unfortunately, widespread foot-dragging continues to act as a brake on debt relief.
▪ The answer is of course that higher interest rates often act like sticky brakes.
▪ In April 1992 they persuaded Boris Yeltsin to put three industrialists into the government to act as a brake on the free-marketeers.
▪ The water itself acts as a brake.
apply
▪ Mrs Thatcher is anxious to apply the brakes.
▪ She saw his physical symptoms as evidence that he was trying unsuccessfully to apply the brakes on a natural evolutionary process.
▪ That's because with intervention stocks rising, the Commission has to apply the brakes.
▪ If the driver does not respond, a back-up system automatically applies the brakes or makes less engine power available.
▪ The same applies to the brakes.
▪ Seasoned observers have no doubt that the vocal response of so many has been instrumental in applying a brake.
▪ Stand by the bicycle, apply the front brake and try to push the bicycle forwards.
fit
▪ The automatic vacuum brake was fitted in conjunction with a hand brake for the guard's use.
▪ This will take us about three months to complete after which we will concentrate on fitting brake and lubrication gear.
hit
▪ Every time I hit the brakes it was grin-and-bear-it stuff.
▪ The chain-link fence swerved in, and this time I hit the brakes hard.
▪ The blonde hit the brakes too late and the wheels cut and thrust into the water, screaming.
▪ He must remember not to hit the brake too hard; it would lock the rear wheel and lay the bike down.
▪ I turned into a gentle left hand bend, saw a queue of cars ahead and hit the brake.
jam
▪ Most people naively imagine they will stop immediately when they jam on the brakes.
▪ When he jammed the brakes on she was better balanced.
▪ He jammed his brakes, and stopped his circling feet.
lock
▪ Alain went for the gap, Steve moved over and Alain locked up the brakes flat-out in top.
put
▪ Shortages can put a brake on development.
▪ Everybody kept putting on their brakes.
▪ And that will put a brake on industrial well-being.
▪ If Peres and Labor are defeated, the Likud Party has vowed to put the brakes on the peace movement.
▪ The Communists have climbed on the bandwagon, but only to put the brakes on.
▪ If I did not put on the brakes, I might be swept away into assimilation, which I resisted.
▪ But looking after five-month-old daughter Atlanta has put a brake on her clothes shopping sprees.
▪ Yet continuity in this case implies Washington putting a brake on Kim's sunshine diplomacy.
slam
▪ Death Horror-struck, all he could do was slam on the brakes and pray.
▪ My friend grabbed my arm and yelled and I slammed on the brakes.
▪ If they don't agree on promotion, the stadium's financial backers may slam on the brakes.
▪ All she could do was to slam on the brakes and shut her eyes.
use
▪ The horse finds balance by bringing his hocks underneath him and also uses this means for brakes and acceleration.
▪ If there is a possible area for a safe landing, use the brakes and get down into it.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
foot pedal/brake/pump etc
▪ He then, with a foot pedal, activates the wire-cutter.
▪ I also use a Boogie and split the signal from a foot pedal to two amps usually.
▪ I hear the rat-ta-ta-tat of the foot pedal, as she stitches along.
▪ The amount of push, and therefore the direction the nose points, is controlled by pushing the foot pedals.
jam on the brakes
▪ Most people naively imagine they will stop immediately when they jam on the brakes.
slam on the brakes
▪ I slammed on the brakes, skidding to a stop.
▪ All she could do was to slam on the brakes and shut her eyes.
▪ Death Horror-struck, all he could do was slam on the brakes and pray.
▪ If they don't agree on promotion, the stadium's financial backers may slam on the brakes.
▪ My friend grabbed my arm and yelled and I slammed on the brakes.
▪ The driver slammed on the brakes; the Jeep screeched to a halt.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The back brake on my bike needs adjusting.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Council officials say lives were at risk from mechanical defects, including faulty brakes.
▪ Feather the brakes, I reminded myself.
▪ Once again, anti-lock brakes and traction control are standard.
▪ She could see at once that the brakes would be useless.
▪ She had to stoop again for the case, and so she caught sight of the pool of brake fluid at once.
▪ The brakes sometimes slow the car, but not always.
▪ The drum brakes are also rather vintage.
▪ The trains were fitted throughout with the Westinghouse brake, in accordance with Continental practice, and with steam-heating apparatus.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
hard
▪ Doyle swerved, running the car on to the right hand verge, and braked hard.
▪ Clayt braked hard, pulled off and cut the engine.
▪ But he might still have been able to stop in time if he'd braked hard enough.
▪ Desperate not to have to overtake, he'd braked hard and had felt the car shimmy dangerously.
▪ He braked hard to a halt outside the Co-op in Newtown, just as Billy and Mary turned the comer.
▪ Streuer had to brake hard, and on purpose he just nudged my backside with the front of his bike.
▪ He braked hard and managed to stop before impact, but the woman fell on to the road in front of his car.
▪ He almost missed the turning off the taxiway to the runway and had to brake hard at the last minute.
sharply
▪ A car had come fast behind them, a silver-grey car, and it had braked sharply.
▪ The executive jet settled on its main wheels and braked sharply as the thrust-reverse and spoilers were deployed.
▪ As she peered ahead of her, something shot across the road in front of the car, forcing her to brake sharply.
▪ Di was just about to drop elder son Wills back at school when she braked sharply to avoid an oncoming motor.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
foot pedal/brake/pump etc
▪ He then, with a foot pedal, activates the wire-cutter.
▪ I also use a Boogie and split the signal from a foot pedal to two amps usually.
▪ I hear the rat-ta-ta-tat of the foot pedal, as she stitches along.
▪ The amount of push, and therefore the direction the nose points, is controlled by pushing the foot pedals.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A bus came round the corner and braked sharply.
▪ I saw a roadblock ahead, and braked.
▪ She had to brake suddenly to avoid a dog in the road.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Clayt braked hard, pulled off and cut the engine.
▪ He braked for drugs, booze, and hookers, and wrote a good book about a bum existence.
▪ I couldn't pull over without forcing some one else to brake and I simply didn't have the power to get away.
▪ I endeavored to brake, but succeeded only in causing the most extreme and painful sensations under my fingernails.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Brake

Brake \Brake\ (br[=a]k), imp. of Break. [Arhaic]
--Tennyson.

Brake

Brake \Brake\, n. [OE. brake fern; cf. AS. bracce fern, LG. brake willow bush, Da. bregne fern, G. brach fallow; prob. orig. the growth on rough, broken ground, fr. the root of E. break. See Break, v. t., cf. Bracken, and 2d Brake, n.]

  1. (Bot.) A fern of the genus Pteris, esp. the Pteris aquilina, common in almost all countries. It has solitary stems dividing into three principal branches. Less properly: Any fern.

  2. A thicket; a place overgrown with shrubs and brambles, with undergrowth and ferns, or with canes.

    Rounds rising hillocks, brakes obscure and rough, To shelter thee from tempest and from rain.
    --Shak.

    He stayed not for brake, and he stopped not for stone.
    --Sir W. Scott.

    Cane brake, a thicket of canes. See Canebrake.

Brake

Brake \Brake\ (br[=a]k), n. [OE. brake; cf. LG. brake an instrument for breaking flax, G. breche, fr. the root of E. break. See Break, v. t., and cf. Breach.]

  1. An instrument or machine to break or bruise the woody part of flax or hemp so that it may be separated from the fiber.

  2. An extended handle by means of which a number of men can unite in working a pump, as in a fire engine.

  3. A baker's kneading though.
    --Johnson.

  4. A sharp bit or snaffle.

    Pampered jades . . . which need nor break nor bit.
    --Gascoigne.

  5. A frame for confining a refractory horse while the smith is shoeing him; also, an inclosure to restrain cattle, horses, etc.

    A horse . . . which Philip had bought . . . and because of his fierceness kept him within a brake of iron bars.
    --J. Brende.

  6. That part of a carriage, as of a movable battery, or engine, which enables it to turn.

  7. (Mil.) An ancient engine of war analogous to the crossbow and ballista.

  8. (Agric.) A large, heavy harrow for breaking clods after plowing; a drag.

  9. A piece of mechanism for retarding or stopping motion by friction, as of a carriage or railway car, by the pressure of rubbers against the wheels, or of clogs or ratchets against the track or roadway, or of a pivoted lever against a wheel or drum in a machine.

  10. (Engin.) An apparatus for testing the power of a steam engine, or other motor, by weighing the amount of friction that the motor will overcome; a friction brake.

  11. A cart or carriage without a body, used in breaking in horses.

  12. An ancient instrument of torture. --Holinshed. Air brake. See Air brake, in the Vocabulary. Brake beam or Brake bar, the beam that connects the brake blocks of opposite wheels. Brake block.

    1. The part of a brake holding the brake shoe.

    2. A brake shoe.

      Brake shoe or Brake rubber, the part of a brake against which the wheel rubs.

      Brake wheel, a wheel on the platform or top of a car by which brakes are operated.

      Continuous brake . See under Continuous.

Brake

Break \Break\ (br[=a]k), v. t. [imp. broke (br[=o]k), (Obs. Brake); p. p. Broken (br[=o]"k'n), (Obs. Broke); p. pr. & vb. n. Breaking.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak, Sw. braka, br["a]kka to crack, Dan. br[ae]kke to break, Goth. brikan to break, L. frangere. Cf. Bray to pound, Breach, Fragile.]

  1. To strain apart; to sever by fracture; to divide with violence; as, to break a rope or chain; to break a seal; to break an axle; to break rocks or coal; to break a lock.
    --Shak.

  2. To lay open as by breaking; to divide; as, to break a package of goods.

  3. To lay open, as a purpose; to disclose, divulge, or communicate.

    Katharine, break thy mind to me.
    --Shak.

  4. To infringe or violate, as an obligation, law, or promise.

    Out, out, hyena! these are thy wonted arts . . . To break all faith, all vows, deceive, betray.
    --Milton

  5. To interrupt; to destroy the continuity of; to dissolve or terminate; as, to break silence; to break one's sleep; to break one's journey.

    Go, release them, Ariel; My charms I'll break, their senses I'll restore.
    --Shak.

  6. To destroy the completeness of; to remove a part from; as, to break a set.

  7. To destroy the arrangement of; to throw into disorder; to pierce; as, the cavalry were not able to break the British squares.

  8. To shatter to pieces; to reduce to fragments.

    The victim broke in pieces the musical instruments with which he had solaced the hours of captivity.
    --Prescott.

  9. To exchange for other money or currency of smaller denomination; as, to break a five dollar bill.

  10. To destroy the strength, firmness, or consistency of; as, to break flax.

  11. To weaken or impair, as health, spirit, or mind.

    An old man, broken with the storms of state.
    --Shak.

  12. To diminish the force of; to lessen the shock of, as a fall or blow.

    I'll rather leap down first, and break your fall.
    --Dryden.

  13. To impart, as news or information; to broach; -- with to, and often with a modified word implying some reserve; as, to break the news gently to the widow; to break a purpose cautiously to a friend.

  14. To tame; to reduce to subjection; to make tractable; to discipline; as, to break a horse to the harness or saddle. ``To break a colt.''
    --Spenser.

    Why, then thou canst not break her to the lute?
    --Shak.

  15. To destroy the financial credit of; to make bankrupt; to ruin.

    With arts like these rich Matho, when he speaks, Attracts all fees, and little lawyers breaks.
    --Dryden.

  16. To destroy the official character and standing of; to cashier; to dismiss. I see a great officer broken. --Swift. Note: With prepositions or adverbs: To break down.

    1. To crush; to overwhelm; as, to break down one's strength; to break down opposition.

    2. To remove, or open a way through, by breaking; as, to break down a door or wall. To break in.

      1. To force in; as, to break in a door.

      2. To train; to discipline; as, a horse well broken in. To break of, to rid of; to cause to abandon; as, to break one of a habit. To break off.

        1. To separate by breaking; as, to break off a twig.

        2. To stop suddenly; to abandon. ``Break off thy sins by righteousness.'' --Dan. iv. 27. To break open, to open by breaking. ``Open the door, or I will break it open.'' --Shak. To break out, to take or force out by breaking; as, to break out a pane of glass. To break out a cargo, to unstow a cargo, so as to unload it easily. To break through.

          1. To make an opening through, as, as by violence or the force of gravity; to pass violently through; as, to break through the enemy's lines; to break through the ice.

          2. To disregard; as, to break through the ceremony. To break up.

            1. To separate into parts; to plow (new or fallow ground). ``Break up this capon.''
              --Shak. ``Break up your fallow ground.''
              --Jer. iv. 3.

            2. To dissolve; to put an end to. ``Break up the court.'' --Shak. To break (one) all up, to unsettle or disconcert completely; to upset. [Colloq.] Note: With an immediate object: To break the back.

              1. To dislocate the backbone; hence, to disable totally.

              2. To get through the worst part of; as, to break the back of a difficult undertaking. To break bulk, to destroy the entirety of a load by removing a portion of it; to begin to unload; also, to transfer in detail, as from boats to cars. To break a code to discover a method to convert coded messages into the original understandable text. To break cover, to burst forth from a protecting concealment, as game when hunted. To break a deer or To break a stag, to cut it up and apportion the parts among those entitled to a share. To break fast, to partake of food after abstinence. See Breakfast. To break ground.

                1. To open the earth as for planting; to commence excavation, as for building, siege operations, and the like; as, to break ground for a foundation, a canal, or a railroad.

                2. Fig.: To begin to execute any plan.

    3. (Naut.) To release the anchor from the bottom.

      To break the heart, to crush or overwhelm (one) with grief.

      To break a house (Law), to remove or set aside with violence and a felonious intent any part of a house or of the fastenings provided to secure it.

      To break the ice, to get through first difficulties; to overcome obstacles and make a beginning; to introduce a subject.

      To break jail, to escape from confinement in jail, usually by forcible means.

      To break a jest, to utter a jest. ``Patroclus . . . the livelong day breaks scurril jests.''
      --Shak.

      To break joints, to lay or arrange bricks, shingles, etc., so that the joints in one course shall not coincide with those in the preceding course.

      To break a lance, to engage in a tilt or contest.

      To break the neck, to dislocate the joints of the neck.

      To break no squares, to create no trouble. [Obs.]

      To break a path, road, etc., to open a way through obstacles by force or labor.

      To break upon a wheel, to execute or torture, as a criminal by stretching him upon a wheel, and breaking his limbs with an iron bar; -- a mode of punishment formerly employed in some countries.

      To break wind, to give vent to wind from the anus.

      Syn: To dispart; rend; tear; shatter; batter; violate; infringe; demolish; destroy; burst; dislocate.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
brake

mid-15c., "instrument for crushing or pounding," from Middle Dutch braeke "flax brake," from breken "to break" (see break (v.)). The word was applied to many crushing implements and to the ring through the nose of a draught ox. It was influenced in sense by Old French brac, a form of bras "an arm," thus "a lever or handle," which was being used in English from late 14c., and applied to "a bridle or curb" from early 15c. One or the other or both took up the main modern meaning of "stopping device for a wheel," first attested 1772.

brake

kind of fern, early 14c.; see bracken.

brake

"to apply a brake to a wheel," 1868, from brake (n.1). Earlier, "to beat flax" (late 14c.). Related: Braked; braking.

Wiktionary
brake

Etymology 1 n. A fern; bracken. (from 14th c.) Etymology 2

n. A thicket, or an area overgrown with briers etc. (from 15th c.) Etymology 3

n. 1 A tool used for breaking flax or hemp. (from 15th c.) 2 A type of machine for bending sheet metal. (See wikipedia:Brake (box and pan).) 3 A large, heavy harrow for breaking clods after ploughing; a drag. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To bruise and crush; to knead 2 (context transitive English) To pulverise with a harrow Etymology 4

n. 1 (label en military) An ancient engine of war analogous to the crossbow and ballist

  1. 2 # (label en obsolete) The winch of a crossbow. (14th-19th c.) 3 (label en chiefly nautical) The handle of a pump. 4 A device used to slow or stop the motion of a wheel, or of a vehicle, by friction; also, the controls or apparatus used to engage such a mechanism such as the pedal in a car. (from 18th c.) 5 # The act of braking, of using a brake to slow down a machine or vehicle 6 # (label en engineering) An apparatus for testing the power of a steam engine or other motor by weighing the amount of friction that the motor will overcome; a friction brake. 7 # (label en figuratively) Something used to retard or stop some action, process etc. 8 A baker's kneading trough. 9 A device used to confine or prevent the motion of an animal. 10 # A frame for confining a refractory horse while the smith is shoeing him. 11 # An enclosure to restrain cattle, horses, etc. 12 # A cart or carriage without a body, used in break in horses.(w Brake (carriage) W) 13 # A carriage for transporting shooting parties and their equipment.(w Shooting-brake W) v

  2. 1 (context intransitive English) To operate (a) brake(s). 2 (context intransitive English) To be stopped or slowed (as if) by braking. Etymology 5

    n. 1 (context obsolete English) A cage. (16th-17th

  3. ) 2 (context now historical English) A type of torture instrument. (from 16th c.) Etymology 6

    vb. (lb en archaic) (en-simple past of: break)

WordNet
brake
  1. v. stop travelling by applying a brake; "We had to brake suddenly when a chicken crossed the road"

  2. cause to stop by applying the brakes; "brake the car before you go into a curve"

brake
  1. n. a restraint used to slow or stop a vehicle

  2. any of various ferns of the genus Pteris having pinnately compound leaves and including several popular houseplants

  3. large coarse fern often several feet high; essentially weed ferns; cosmopolitan [syn: bracken, pasture brake, Pteridium aquilinum]

  4. an area thickly overgrown usually with one kind of plant

Wikipedia
Brake

A brake is a mechanical device that inhibits motion by absorbing energy from a moving system. It is used for slowing or stopping a moving vehicle, wheel, axle, or to prevent its motion, most often accomplished by means of friction.

Brake (sheet metal bending)

A brake is a metalworking machine that allows the bending of sheet metal. A cornice brake only allows for simple bends and creases, while a box-and-pan brake also allows one to form box and pan shapes. It is also known as a bending machine or bending brake or in Britain as a sheet metal folder or just a folder.

Brake (carriage)

A brake (French: break), was a horse-drawn carriage used in the 19th and early 20th centuries in the training of horses for draft work. A shooting-brake, was a brake pressed into service to carry beaters, gamekeepers and sportsmen with their dogs, guns and game.

There were purpose-built shooting-brakes designed to carry the driver and a footman or gamekeeper at the front facing forward, and passengers on longitudinal benches, with their dogs, guns and game borne along the sides in slatted racks.

In the 19th century, a brake was a large, four-wheeled carriage-frame with no body, used for breaking in young horses, either singly or in teams of two or four. It has no body parts except for a high seat upon which the driver sits and a small platform for a helper immediately behind.

If the passenger seats were made permanent the vehicle might be described as a waggonette.

Currently the term is sometimes used for an estate car (see also shooting-brake) or station wagon. In France, the term break is synonymous with a station wagon, having been called a break de chasse, literally translated: hunting break.

Brake (disambiguation)

A brake is a device which inhibits motion.

Brake may also refer to one of the following:

__NOTOC__

Brake (surname)

Brake is a surname of English origin and may refer to:

  • Brian Brake (1927–1988), New Zealand photographer
  • Colin Brake (born 1963), English television writer and script editor
  • John Brake (New Zealand rugby player) (born 1952), New Zealand rugby union player and coach
  • John Brake (born 1988), English rugby union player
  • Patricia Brake (born 1942), English television actress
  • Richard Brake, Welsh/American actor
  • Tom Brake (born 1962), British politician
Brake (charity)

Brake is a charity that operates internationally from its bases in the UK and New Zealand and was established in 1995. It coordinates Road Safety Week, inviting participation worldwide, and has many supporters worldwide in communities, companies (particularly those interested in managing their road risk through operation of fleets), emergency services, schools and all other sectors of society. It also provides support services for people bereaved and injured in road crashes and the professionals who care for them, including the emergency services. Its head office is based in the UK.

Brake (film)

Brake is an 2012 American thriller film directed by Gabe Torres, written by Timothy Mannion, and starring Stephen Dorff.

Brake (Anderson)

"Brake" is a science fiction short story by Poul Anderson that was first published in 1957 in Astounding Science Fiction and reprinted in the collections Beyond the Beyond (1969) and The Psychotechnic League (1981). As a component of the Psychotechnic League future history / alternate history, "Brake" takes place in 2270, as the civilization built up in the aftermath of the 1958 Third World War is being torn between mutually antagonistic factions, on the verge of collapsing into "the day of genocide and the night of ignorance and tyranny".

As noted by Vernon Blake, the story was written and published within two months of " Marius" and they were clearly written as companion pieces - the dawn and sunset of the same culture (later stories of this Future History would be set in the further future, when a still newer civilization would arise from the ruins of what would be called "The Second Dark Ages").

Marius and Brake are linked by various common themes - one featuring the first appearance of the maquis Stefan Rostomily, the other having the last appearance of Rostomily's cloned "sons"; in one Étienne Fourre appears for the first time, in his heroic effort to restore the shattered world, in the other the memory of Fourre is abused and his legacy is claimed by one of the militant factions busily working to shatter it again. In fact, it is Captain Banning, the story' protagonist, who is Fourre's true heir, bravely striving to preserve, for as long as possible, what Fourre and his companions had built.

Usage examples of "brake".

So I ask you again, when the owner of that defective car gets into it and drives over Gough or Franklin streets, knowing those streets are extremely unsafe for cars with faulty brakes, and then injures or kills someone when the brakes do fail, do you advocate that the driver not be held accountable for his reckless, despicably antisocial behavior?

As an arrowy serpent, pursuing the form Of an elephant, bursts through the brakes of the waste.

So, even though braking would not be required until the ship reached the balk line ten days hence, Gorgas ordered the Flip when they reached the median of the grand secant and hosted the traditional meal that very evening.

But asking a twelve year old boy to clutch a balky brake lever as a wagon slips and slides down a cliff totally amazes me.

With his foot on the brake, Barton turned the nose of the Packard down and began to descend.

It is social, yet not averse to solitude, singing often in groups, and as often by itself in the furze brake, or on the briery knoll.

With a parting smile, he stepped forward, grasped the doorknob, and thrust himself through to Earth, bringing up his right hand to brake against the wall.

Sergeant Brool was braking his speed and turning so that he would land tail fins first.

Ross stowed his share of the dynamite more cautiously, unlocked the brakes, put the bulldozer in gear, and backed across the square.

Langdon reached the exit of the park, he swallowed his machismo and jammed on the brakes.

Colonel Manesh lowered the flaps and applied full throttle, still keeping his feet against the brake pedals.

Satisfied that the brakes were operating properly, Manesh released them and the 39,000-pound craft bolted forward, leaving behind the safety of the concrete shelter.

And the mellay that was stayed while those lords dealt together in single combat brake forth afresh in that place.

Todd had been killed five years later when a newsie airtruck had lost its emergency brake on a hill while Todd was loading it.

The original complaint had alleged that Herb Hall, a truck driver, had suffered severe burns and been rendered a paraplegic when the sixteen-wheeler he was driving for a hauling company had lost its brakes on a downhill grade.