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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

borrower

noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
corporate
▪ They can no longer lend at a profit to well rated corporate borrowers.
▪ And very generally, the interests of lenders in New York take a back seat to the interests of the corporate borrowers.
existing
▪ It is difficult for existing borrowers to get mortgage protection insurance.
▪ Eleven days ago, the second largest lender, the Abbey National, stopped selling mortgage protection insurance to its existing borrowers.
▪ Lenders in general often appeared to be financing the tempting rates offered to first-time buyers at the expense of existing borrowers.
new
▪ The new borrower will insist on some element of non-recourse.
▪ According to a recent survey, one in four new borrowers takes out unemployment insurance, double the number of three years ago.
▪ Some have gone even further and are offering free mortgage protection insurance for new borrowers.
▪ Few new borrowers pay the ordinary standard rate.
▪ Its new scheme will assess the credit risk of new borrowers according to their age, marital status and number of children.
▪ And, while both discounts are available to first-time buyers, Lambeth extends its offer to include all new borrowers.
▪ Details of discounts for first-time buyers or new borrowers and deals for larger loans.
▪ But new borrowers will not get the repossessed homes for a song.
■ VERB
allow
▪ Unlike most fixed-rate mortgages, it allows borrowers to pay off the loan and move home at any time.
▪ The Abbey National was the first society to allow borrowers to see valuations and duly sent her a copy.
pay
▪ Loan interest paid by borrowers provides for interest on time deposits, staff salaries, other administrative expenses and shareholder dividends.
▪ Various fees are paid by the borrower.
▪ Depending on the details of the transaction, this adds to the interest rate being paid by the borrower.
rate
▪ Also, the cost of credit card crime pushes interest rates up for all borrowers.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The bank is asking borrowers to repay their loans.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And since the debt was secured by deeds to their homes, borrowers often lost their houses when they could not repay.
▪ At the same time the Abbey raised its rate for borrowers of more than £60,000 from 12.95 to 13.9 percent.
▪ In both instances lenders and borrowers activity will tend to ensure that their expectations become fulfilled.
▪ In order to lock into today's low rates potential borrowers will have to agree to marginally higher rates than are really current.
▪ Most of those borrowers defaulted and many abandoned the properties.
▪ The city is not liable for payment on the bonds even if the borrower defaults, Gittings said.
▪ Various fees are paid by the borrower.
WordNet

borrower

n. someone who receives something on the promise to return it or its equivalent [ant: lender]

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Borrower

Borrower \Bor"row*er\, n. One who borrows.

Neither a borrower nor a lender be.
--Shak.

Wiktionary

borrower

n. One who borrows.

Usage examples of "borrower".

For some reason a book borrower feels that a book, once taken, is his own.

The path of the borrower is a thorny one, especially if, like Spennie, his reputation as a payer-back is not of the best.

Like stock prices on a wild, roller-coaster day on Wall Street, the amount of money the compulsive borrower possesses at any given moment goes through extreme fluctuations, but when all is said and done, an accounting of his finances shows that he is no better off than when he began.

It is, that they facilitate, between borrowers and lenders, the means of finding and treating with each other.

In guaranteeing the non-payers, the State may, indeed, increase the number of borrowers, and thus raise the rate of interest (always to the prejudice of the tax-payer), but it has no power to increase the number of lenders, and the importance of the total of the loans.

Furthermore, this secret band of robbers and murderers, who were the real borrowers of this money, having no legitimate corporate existence, have no corporate property with which to pay these debts.

In fact, these apparently two classes, borrowers and lenders, were really one and the same class.

Nor did he trouble his borrowers with abstract calculations of figures, or references to ready-reckoners.

While I ground, and pinched, and used these needy borrowers for my pleasure and profit, what smooth-tongued speeches, and courteous looks, and civil letters, they would have given me!

I think it's likely this was done by one of the former borrowers, ahead of you.

I've copied a list of the borrowers and I intend to investigate each one of them in turn.

Prautch, examining the cases of fifty-one complaints against usurious landlords in San Ildefonso, found that "Article 8," above cited, was unknown either to lender or to borrowers, and that no attempt had ever been made to apply it in any loan on produce made by any one to any one.

A large slice of the bank’s profits came from the interest paid by borrowers.

Cross may stand, if on any, it cannot for a moment be admitted that borrowers in general have not trespass and trover.

Book borrowers are very apt to be negligent, so that when we see a lad so particular as Abraham was, it is worth while to take note of the fact.