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The Collaborative International Dictionary

Bore

Bore \Bore\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bored; p. pr. & vb. n. Boring.] [OE. borien, AS. borian; akin to Icel. bora, Dan. bore, D. boren, OHG. por?n, G. bohren, L. forare, Gr. ? to plow, Zend bar. [root]9

  1. ] 1. To perforate or penetrate, as a solid body, by turning an auger, gimlet, drill, or other instrument; to make a round hole in or through; to pierce; as, to bore a plank.

    I'll believe as soon this whole earth may be bored.
    --Shak.

  2. To form or enlarge by means of a boring instrument or apparatus; as, to bore a steam cylinder or a gun barrel; to bore a hole.

    Short but very powerful jaws, by means whereof the insect can bore, as with a centerbit, a cylindrical passage through the most solid wood.
    --T. W. Harris.

  3. To make (a passage) by laborious effort, as in boring; as, to bore one's way through a crowd; to force a narrow and difficult passage through. ``What bustling crowds I bored.''
    --Gay.

  4. To weary by tedious iteration or by dullness; to tire; to trouble; to vex; to annoy; to pester.

    He bores me with some trick.
    --Shak.

    Used to come and bore me at rare intervals.
    --Carlyle.

  5. To befool; to trick. [Obs.]

    I am abused, betrayed; I am laughed at, scorned, Baffled and bored, it seems.
    --Beau. & Fl.

Bore

Bore \Bore\ (b[=o]r), n.

  1. A hole made by boring; a perforation.

  2. The internal cylindrical cavity of a gun, cannon, pistol, or other firearm, or of a pipe or tube.

    The bores of wind instruments.
    --Bacon.

    Love's counselor should fill the bores of hearing.
    --Shak.

  3. The size of a hole; the interior diameter of a tube or gun barrel; the caliber.

  4. A tool for making a hole by boring, as an auger.

  5. Caliber; importance. [Obs.]

    Yet are they much too light for the bore of the matter.
    --Shak.

  6. A person or thing that wearies by prolixity or dullness; a tiresome person or affair; any person or thing which causes ennui.

    It is as great a bore as to hear a poet read his own verses.
    --Hawthorne.

Bore

Bore \Bore\, v. i.

  1. To make a hole or perforation with, or as with, a boring instrument; to cut a circular hole by the rotary motion of a tool; as, to bore for water or oil (i. e., to sink a well by boring for water or oil); to bore with a gimlet; to bore into a tree (as insects).

  2. To be pierced or penetrated by an instrument that cuts as it turns; as, this timber does not bore well, or is hard to bore.

  3. To push forward in a certain direction with laborious effort.

    They take their flight . . . boring to the west.
    --Dryden.

  4. (Man.) To shoot out the nose or toss it in the air; -- said of a horse.
    --Crabb.

Bore

Bear \Bear\ (b[^a]r), v. t. [imp. Bore (b[=o]r) (formerly Bare (b[^a]r)); p. p. Born (b[^o]rn), Borne (b[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. Bearing.] [OE. beren, AS. beran, beoran, to bear, carry, produce; akin to D. baren to bring forth, G. geb["a]ren, Goth. ba['i]ran to bear or carry, Icel. bera, Sw. b["a]ra, Dan. b[ae]re, OHG. beran, peran, L. ferre to bear, carry, produce, Gr. fe`rein, OSlav. brati to take, carry, OIr. berim I bear, Skr. bh[.r] to bear. [root]92. Cf. Fertile.]

  1. To support or sustain; to hold up.

  2. To support and remove or carry; to convey.

    I 'll bear your logs the while.
    --Shak.

  3. To conduct; to bring; -- said of persons. [Obs.]

    Bear them to my house.
    --Shak.

  4. To possess and use, as power; to exercise.

    Every man should bear rule in his own house.
    --Esther i. 22.

  5. To sustain; to have on (written or inscribed, or as a mark), as, the tablet bears this inscription.

  6. To possess or carry, as a mark of authority or distinction; to wear; as, to bear a sword, badge, or name.

  7. To possess mentally; to carry or hold in the mind; to entertain; to harbor
    --Dryden.

    The ancient grudge I bear him.
    --Shak.

  8. To endure; to tolerate; to undergo; to suffer.

    Should such a man, too fond to rule alone, Bear, like the Turk, no brother near the throne.
    --Pope.

    I cannot bear The murmur of this lake to hear.
    --Shelley.

    My punishment is greater than I can bear.
    --Gen. iv. 13.

  9. To gain or win. [Obs.]

    Some think to bear it by speaking a great word.
    --Bacon.

    She was . . . found not guilty, through bearing of friends and bribing of the judge.
    --Latimer.

  10. To sustain, or be answerable for, as blame, expense, responsibility, etc.

    He shall bear their iniquities.
    --Is. liii.

  11. Somewhat that will bear your charges.
    --Dryden.

    11. To render or give; to bring forward. ``Your testimony bear''
    --Dryden.

  12. To carry on, or maintain; to have. ``The credit of bearing a part in the conversation.''
    --Locke.

  13. To admit or be capable of; that is, to suffer or sustain without violence, injury, or change.

    In all criminal cases the most favorable interpretation should be put on words that they can possibly bear.
    --Swift.

  14. To manage, wield, or direct. ``Thus must thou thy body bear.''
    --Shak. Hence: To behave; to conduct.

    Hath he borne himself penitently in prison?
    --Shak.

  15. To afford; to be to; to supply with.

    His faithful dog shall bear him company.
    --Pope.

  16. To bring forth or produce; to yield; as, to bear apples; to bear children; to bear interest. Here dwelt the man divine whom Samos bore. --Dryden. Note: In the passive form of this verb, the best modern usage restricts the past participle born to the sense of brought forth, while borne is used in the other senses of the word. In the active form, borne alone is used as the past participle. To bear down.

    1. To force into a lower place; to carry down; to depress or sink. ``His nose, . . . large as were the others, bore them down into insignificance.''
      --Marryat.

    2. To overthrow or crush by force; as, to bear down an enemy. To bear a hand.

      1. To help; to give assistance.

      2. (Naut.) To make haste; to be quick. To bear in hand, to keep (one) up in expectation, usually by promises never to be realized; to amuse by false pretenses; to delude. [Obs.] ``How you were borne in hand, how crossed.'' --Shak. To bear in mind, to remember. To bear off.

        1. To restrain; to keep from approach.

        2. (Naut.) To remove to a distance; to keep clear from rubbing against anything; as, to bear off a blow; to bear off a boat.

    3. To gain; to carry off, as a prize.

    4. (Backgammon) To remove from the backgammon board into the home when the position of the piece and the dice provide the proper opportunity; -- the goal of the game is to bear off all of one's men before the opponent. To bear one hard, to owe one a grudge. [Obs.] ``C[ae]sar doth bear me hard.'' --Shak. To bear out.

      1. To maintain and support to the end; to defend to the last. ``Company only can bear a man out in an ill thing.''
        --South.

      2. To corroborate; to confirm.

        To bear up, to support; to keep from falling or sinking. ``Religious hope bears up the mind under sufferings.''
        --Addison.

        Syn: To uphold; sustain; maintain; support; undergo; suffer; endure; tolerate; carry; convey; transport; waft.

Bore

Bore \Bore\, imp. of 1st & 2d Bear.

Bore

Bore \Bore\, n. [Icel. b[=a]ra wave: cf. G. empor upwards, OHG. bor height, burren to lift, perh. allied to AS. beran, E. 1st bear. [root]92.] (Physical Geog.)

  1. A tidal flood which regularly or occasionally rushes into certain rivers of peculiar configuration or location, in one or more waves which present a very abrupt front of considerable height, dangerous to shipping, as at the mouth of the Amazon, in South America, the Hoogly and Indus, in India, and the Tsien-tang, in China.

  2. Less properly, a very high and rapid tidal flow, when not so abrupt, such as occurs at the Bay of Fundy and in the British Channel.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

bore

I.
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
bore...malice (=did not feel any malice towards her)
▪ James bore her no malice .
bore...the stamp of (=had)
▪ The speech borethe stamp of authority.
full bore
▪ Kate took a huge slice and was going at it full bore.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
down
▪ The Wolf of Kabul bore down upon him.
▪ His eyes bore down on me out of a somewhat hawklike face, and I immediately became flustered.
▪ An icy wind howled and a great wall of snow bore down upon them.
▪ Her great white face bore down on mine.
▪ She bore down on the hybrids and, with her claws, she killed them almost before they realized.
▪ He bore down again, pressed himself against my back.
▪ Five or six men, horsed, masked and well-armed, burst from a clump of trees and bore down on them.
▪ How Linda fell on to the track and he tried to pick her up just as the train bore down on them.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
bore sb silly
bore/scare etc the pants off sb
▪ He wasn't interested in the heavy political stuff which bored the pants off most people.
▪ It took ten minutes to reach Honey Cottage, with Yanto trying his best to scare the pants off Mary.
▪ Lovely people who scared the pants off him.
▪ The tests scare the pants off many managers.
▪ Though, mind you, it scares the pants off poor old Crumwallis.
bored/scared/worried stiff
▪ And I was scared stiff about having lied to Mel about being single when he hired me.
▪ Cis, who knew about it, was scared stiff.
▪ He was scared stiff, thought a ghastly mistake had been made.
▪ He was very naturally scared stiff of using up all his remaining petrol and making a bad landing.
▪ Mabel was by now scared stiff and frozen cold.
▪ Poor kid, thought Alice, he's scared stiff.
▪ We looked at each other, scared stiff, but we followed Mrs Bullivant upstairs.
crashing bore
▪ At worst, a crashing bore.
deadly serious/dull/boring etc
▪ And at a time which - surely it was obvious - was deadly serious.
▪ He's a deadly dull little man as far as I can see.
▪ He was deadly serious and I knew it.
▪ His companion chuckled at the jest, but Gravelet, whose stage name was Blondin, was deadly serious.
▪ It was now clear, however, that the position was becoming deadly serious.
▪ Suppose, for example, you regularly attend a weekly meeting which tends to be deadly dull.
▪ The noise level was high in both languages; all faces were deadly serious.
▪ The primary indicator is Attempts to be deadly serious invariably result in unintended comedy.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Am I boring you?
▪ Being alone with a baby all day bored her to tears.
▪ He bores everyone with his stories about his girlfriends.
▪ Poetry bores me.
▪ The machine they used to bore the tunnel is the size of a two storey house.
▪ The mining company bored a 5000 foot hole.
▪ They had to bore through solid rock.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And it is not true that a girl decides in junior high that math is, like, so boring.
▪ I will tell you frankly the word Marxism is very boring to me.
▪ It bore out the warnings received from MI6.
▪ Not just resistant to the pitter patter of bored kiddie feet but immune to assaults from the outside as well.
▪ There would be nothing more boring than the landslide that everyone predicted.
▪ Those with earnings just above the tax threshold bore the heaviest burden of the flat rate tax as a proportion of income.
▪ Twin towers bore the arms of the railway companies emblazoned upon them.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
bore sb silly
bore/scare etc the pants off sb
▪ He wasn't interested in the heavy political stuff which bored the pants off most people.
▪ It took ten minutes to reach Honey Cottage, with Yanto trying his best to scare the pants off Mary.
▪ Lovely people who scared the pants off him.
▪ The tests scare the pants off many managers.
▪ Though, mind you, it scares the pants off poor old Crumwallis.
bored/scared/worried stiff
▪ And I was scared stiff about having lied to Mel about being single when he hired me.
▪ Cis, who knew about it, was scared stiff.
▪ He was scared stiff, thought a ghastly mistake had been made.
▪ He was very naturally scared stiff of using up all his remaining petrol and making a bad landing.
▪ Mabel was by now scared stiff and frozen cold.
▪ Poor kid, thought Alice, he's scared stiff.
▪ We looked at each other, scared stiff, but we followed Mrs Bullivant upstairs.
deadly serious/dull/boring etc
▪ And at a time which - surely it was obvious - was deadly serious.
▪ He's a deadly dull little man as far as I can see.
▪ He was deadly serious and I knew it.
▪ His companion chuckled at the jest, but Gravelet, whose stage name was Blondin, was deadly serious.
▪ It was now clear, however, that the position was becoming deadly serious.
▪ Suppose, for example, you regularly attend a weekly meeting which tends to be deadly dull.
▪ The noise level was high in both languages; all faces were deadly serious.
▪ The primary indicator is Attempts to be deadly serious invariably result in unintended comedy.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And it is not true that a girl decides in junior high that math is, like, so boring.
▪ Not just resistant to the pitter patter of bored kiddie feet but immune to assaults from the outside as well.
▪ There would be nothing more boring than the landslide that everyone predicted.
▪ Those with earnings just above the tax threshold bore the heaviest burden of the flat rate tax as a proportion of income.
▪ Twin towers bore the arms of the railway companies emblazoned upon them.
III.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ But she can also be the biggest bore when she piles on endless details about her childhood stomping grounds.
▪ Power will be provided by a big-bore V-twin.
▪ Whereupon the media, denied the excitements that they had trumpeted, declared the whole event a big, irrelevant bore.
wide
▪ This process can be hastened by gentle pipetting of the egg masses through a wide bore glass mouth pipette.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a 12-bore shotgun
▪ At parties she always gets stuck with some bore who wants to tell her the story of his life.
▪ Washing the dishes is a bore.
▪ Winston is such a bore!
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Gluck was armed with an incredibly heavy musket, a single-shot museum piece with an octagonal barrel and a smooth bore.
▪ It was in the direction of Temple Bar Creek and the Mereenie water bores.
▪ Solitons are solitary waves; the Severn bore is a good example.
▪ Whereupon the media, denied the excitements that they had trumpeted, declared the whole event a big, irrelevant bore.
WordNet

bear

  1. n. massive plantigrade carnivorous or omnivorous mammals with long shaggy coats and strong claws

  2. an investor with a pessimistic market outlook; an investor who expects prices to fall and so sells now in order to buy later at a lower price [ant: bull]

  3. [also: borne, born, bore]

bore

  1. n. a person who evokes boredom [syn: dullard]

  2. a high wave (often dangerous) caused by tidal flow (as by colliding tidal currents or in a narrow estuary) [syn: tidal bore, eagre, aegir, eager]

  3. diameter of a tube or gun barrel [syn: gauge, caliber, calibre]

  4. a hole or passage made by a drill; usually made for exploratory purposes [syn: bore-hole, drill hole]

bore

  1. v. cause to be bored [syn: tire] [ant: interest]

  2. make a hole with a pointed power or hand tool; "don't drill here, there's a gas pipe"; "drill a hole into the wall"; "drill for oil" [syn: drill]

bore

See bear

bear

  1. v. have; "bear a resemblance"; "bear a signature"

  2. give birth (to a newborn); "My wife had twins yesterday!" [syn: give birth, deliver, birth, have]

  3. put up with something or somebody unpleasant; "I cannot bear his constant criticism"; "The new secretary had to endure a lot of unprofessional remarks"; "he learned to tolerate the heat"; "She stuck out two years in a miserable marriage" [syn: digest, endure, stick out, stomach, stand, tolerate, support, brook, abide, suffer, put up]

  4. move while holding up or supporting; "Bear gifts"; "bear a heavy load"; "bear news"; "bearing orders"

  5. bring forth, "The apple tree bore delicious apples this year"; "The unidentified plant bore gorgeous flowers" [syn: turn out]

  6. take on as one's own the expenses or debts of another person; "I'll accept the charges"; "She agreed to bear the responsibility" [syn: take over, accept, assume]

  7. contain or hold; have within; "The jar carries wine"; "The canteen holds fresh water"; "This can contains water" [syn: hold, carry, contain]

  8. bring in; "interest-bearing accounts"; "How much does this savings certificate pay annually?" [syn: yield, pay]

  9. have on one's person; "He wore a red ribbon"; "bear a scar" [syn: wear]

  10. behave in a certain manner; "She carried herself well"; "he bore himself with dignity"; "They conducted themselves well during these difficult times" [syn: behave, acquit, deport, conduct, comport, carry]

  11. have rightfully; of rights, titles, and offices; "She bears the title of Duchess"; "He held the governorship for almost a decade" [syn: hold]

  12. support or hold in a certain manner; "She holds her head high"; "He carried himself upright" [syn: hold, carry]

  13. be pregnant with; "She is bearing his child"; "The are expecting another child in January"; "I am carrying his child" [syn: have a bun in the oven, carry, gestate, expect]

  14. [also: borne, born, bore]

Wikipedia

Bore

Bore or Bores may refer to:

Bore (wind instruments)

In music, the bore of a wind instrument (including woodwind and brass) is its interior chamber. This defines a flow path through which air travels, which is set into vibration to produce sounds. The shape of the bore has a strong influence on the instrument's timbre.

Bore (engine)

Bore, is a term used in describing a part of a piston engine. Also known as 'cylinder bore' it also represents the size, in terms of diameter, of the cylinder in which a piston travels. The value of a cylinders bore, and stroke, is used to establish the displacement of an engine.

The term "bore" can also be applied to the bore of a locomotive cylinder or steam engine pistons.

Bore (woreda)

Bore is one of the woredas in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia. Part of the Guji Zone, Bore is bordered on the south by Ana Sora, on the west by the Uraga, and on the north and east by the Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples Region. The largest town in Bore is Bore.

Bore (surname)

Bore or Boré is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Albert Bore (born 1946), British nuclear physicist and politician
  • Etienne de Boré (1741–1820), first mayor of New Orleans
  • Eugène Boré (1809–1878), Roman Catholic missionary and linguist
  • Michael Bore (born 1947), English former cricketer
  • Peter Bore (born 1987), English footballer
  • Thor Bjarne Bore (born 1938), Norwegian newspaper editor and politician
Wiktionary

bore

Etymology 1 n. 1 A hole drilled or milled through something. 2 The tunnel inside of a gun's barrel through which the bullet travels when fired. 3 A tool, such as an auger, for making a hole by boring. 4 A capped well drilled to tap artesian water. The place where the well exists. 5 One who inspires boredom or lack of interest. 6 Something that wearies by prolixity or dullness; a tiresome affair. 7 Calibre; importance. vb. 1 (senseid en to inspire boredom)(context transitive English) To inspire boredom in somebody. 2 (senseid en to make a hole)(context transitive English) To make a hole through something. 3 (context intransitive English) To make a hole with, or as if with, a boring instrument; to cut a circular hole by the rotary motion of a tool. 4 (context transitive English) To form or enlarge (something) by means of a boring instrument or apparatus. 5 (context transitive English) To make (a passage) by laborious effort, as in boring; to force a narrow and difficult passage through. 6 (context intransitive English) To be pierced or penetrated by an instrument that cuts as it turns. 7 (context intransitive English) To push forward in a certain direction with laborious effort. 8 (context of a horse English) To shoot out the nose or toss it in the air. 9 (context obsolete English) To fool; to trick. Etymology 2

n. A sudden and rapid flow of tide in certain rivers and estuaries which rolls up as a wave; an eagre. Etymology 3

vb. (en-simple pastbear)

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

bore

past tense of bear (v.).

bore

thing which causes ennui or annoyance, 1778; of persons by 1812; from bore (v.1).\nThe secret of being a bore is to tell everything. [Voltaire, "Sept Discours en Vers sur l'Homme," 1738]

bore

Old English borian "to bore through, perforate," from bor "auger," from Proto-Germanic *buron (cognates: Old Norse bora, Swedish borra, Old High German boron, Middle Dutch boren, German bohren), from PIE root *bher- (2) "to cut with a sharp point, pierce, bore" (cognates: Greek pharao "I plow," Latin forare "to bore, pierce," Old Church Slavonic barjo "to strike, fight," Albanian brime "hole").\n

\nThe meaning "diameter of a tube" is first recorded 1570s; hence figurative slang full bore (1936) "at maximum speed," from notion of unchoked carburetor on an engine. Sense of "be tiresome or dull" first attested 1768, a vogue word c.1780-81 according to Grose (1785); possibly a figurative extension of "to move forward slowly and persistently," as a boring tool does.

Usage examples of "bore".

It bore both the rich aroma of leaves being burnt in the fall and the faint perfume of wildflowers ablow in the spring, but it also held a third attar which seemed to be the breath of the Wind itself which none could ever set name to.

The size or bore of the adjutage was strictly regulated by law, and under the authority of the aediles.

The other British force which faced the Boers who were advancing through Stormberg was commanded by General Gatacre, a man who bore a high reputation for fearlessness and tireless energy, though he had been criticised, notably during the Soudan campaign, for having called upon his men for undue and unnecessary exertion.

The adzes bore resemblances to those of various inhabited Polynesian islands.

Had scarce burst forth, when from afar The ministers of misrule sent, Seized upon Lionel, and bore His chained limbs to a dreary tower, In the midst of a city vast and wide.

Tiriki scampered into the room, her silky fair hair all aflutter about the elfin face, her small tunic torn, one pink foot sandalled and the other bare, whose rapid uneven steps bore her swiftly to Domaris.

This must have been one of his bored days, spent wandering aimlessly through the house with an occasional pause to glance over some possession of his before he grew tired of it and began wandering again.

There be two wayes, either death or shame, That thou must suffer, -- alas that I was bore!

Lucas had a strong suspicion that Amaryllis was stuffed to her pretty eyeballs with a host of old-fashioned, boring, and very inconvenient virtues.

A young, bored, anorexic girl flicked the pages of a Simone De Beauvoir novel.

In fact, of the twenty rose-trees which formed the parterre, not one bore the mark of the slug, nor were there evidences anywhere of the clustering aphis which is so destructive to plants growing in a damp soil.

Maeve seemed strangely interested in the intricacies of the Mac Ard genealogy and asked several questions, but Jenna was bored.

The horse swiveled a bored eye at Gareth, shook its neck, then nuzzled Argot, hoping for an apple.

It was a shapeless mythical monster that bore little relation to the actual Catholic doctrine of equivocation-- heroic if arguably ill-advised--which was intended to avoid the sin of lying when in dangerous conditions.

I am well aware of the limits of Artesian borings, and it is not likely that I would have spent millions of pounds upon my colossal tunnel if a six-inch boring would have met my needs.