Find the word definition

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

bone

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
bone china
bone dry
▪ There had been no rain for months and the land was bone dry.
bone idle
▪ He’s just bone idle.
bone marrow
▪ a bone marrow transplant
chill sb to the bone/chill sb to the marrow/chill sb’s blood (=frighten sb a lot)
▪ He jerked his head round and saw something that chilled his blood.
chilled to the bone/marrow (=extremely cold)
▪ Come and sit by the fire – you look chilled to the bone.
cut sth to the bone (=reduce it to the lowest level possible)
▪ Funding for art and music in schools has been cut to the bone.
dry as a bone/bone dry (=completely dry)
▪ These plants need some water – they’re dry as a bone.
dry as a bone/bone dry (=completely dry)
▪ These plants need some water – they’re dry as a bone.
funny bone
marrow bone
pared to the bone (=reduced as far as possible)
▪ The country’s defences have been pared to the bone .
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
bare
▪ The strength of this book is that it puts flesh on the bare bones of this argument.
▪ But Forbes' state organization can still be described as bare bones.
▪ Rip Rig created a heady hybrid out of the bare bones of jazz improvisation, dub-funk rhythms and punk attitude.
▪ Now it was bare as picked-clean bone.
▪ The above is the bare bones of the arrangement.
▪ To clothe these bare bones we have to find other material.
▪ We have outlined only the bare bones of the B &038; B method.
▪ With blood pouring from the bare bone he made it to a pub near Loose, Kent, where regulars called 999.
brittle
▪ Osteoporosis Otherwise known as brittle bone disease, osteoporosis is a major cause of disability and premature death.
▪ Perhaps I was getting too old and not nimble enough, and too brittle in the bone.
▪ Toning exercises also help protect against the brittle bone disease osteoporosis.
▪ He felt drawn, close to exhaustion, his skin stretched tight, like parchment, over his brittle bones.
▪ He brought the stone down once again; heard the brittle sound of bone as it snapped beneath the rock.
▪ Subzero temperatures in December and January can turn the ice as brittle as bone china.
▪ In brittle bone disease, collagen is abnormal in strength or in the links between the fibres.
▪ As the Venets' experience shows, trying to avoid fractures in brittle bone children can be very difficult.
broken
▪ Mr Robson suffered broken bones in both hands.
▪ Picture by Brendan O'Sullivan Few of us get through childhood without a broken bone or a few stitches.
▪ It can cope with a cold, fight off a serious illness and with time, even mend a broken bone.
▪ That's what a grave was: a dump for torn flesh, broken bones.
▪ In the 1930s top personalities from the wider sporting world took their bruises and broken bones to Highbury.
▪ People were impostors and children were nothing but the promise of broken bones.
▪ Sandra is still under sedation in hospital, suffering from internal injuries and a broken collar bone.
▪ But then it took broken bones longer to heal as age crept into them.
dry
▪ Ezekiel called upon the four winds to put living breath into the dry bones.
▪ Even the bare winter branches, tidy and muted like dry bones, had become a disturbance of tangled nerves.
▪ Her mouth felt as dry as a bone and her eyes were closed against the intrusive light.
hip
▪ Examples of the two major kinds of dinosaurs, showing the structure of the hip bones which distinguishes them.
▪ The blade hone and the irregular shapes from the hip bone identify shoulder and sirloin cuts.
▪ There was some clothing on the body but it was really just a skeleton, the hip bones were sticking out.
▪ It is the shape of the hip bones, rather than other anatomical differences, that are used to classify dinosaurs.
▪ More interesting still, recent fossil discoveries show that the hip bones of some giant dinosaurs were almost hollow.
▪ The slope of the hip bone is about 20-30 degrees.
human
▪ For all he knew it might not be unusual to unearth human bones in grounds such as these.
▪ I believe with every human bone, piece of flesh and hank of hair I possess that the government is right.
▪ Entangled with its branches were shards of human bone, crushed now, gleaming in the glistening green.
▪ He had his pockets full of human finger bones.
▪ Baker suggests three possible reasons why human sinus bones should be naturally magnetic.
▪ The moon and the star are personified, the skyscraper is a human skeleton with bones and ribs.
▪ Behind, lay a pile of chained human bones, a slumped fettered skeleton.
▪ Animals are often poor models for humans; bones in rats are quite different from human bones.
■ NOUN
animal
▪ Rufus did not even know if animal bones shared the same names as those of humans.
▪ Shreds of plastic, old iron, glass, animal bones littered both sides of the path.
▪ In such conditions, animal bones of any kind degrade very fast, and no fossilisation occurs.
▪ Fine bone china is made from three main raw materials - china stone, china clay and animal bone.
▪ A bone needle, some animal bones and a few sherds of pottery were found here.
▪ These are not necessarily human-made objects, since finds include anything like animal bones and insect remains.
▪ Calcium is sometimes added deliberately to clays in the form of animal bone ash.
▪ Because animal bones are much more likely to survive than plant remains, the evidence is unduly biased towards a meat-eating diet.
cheek
▪ She had the face of an angel, high cheek bones and perfectly formed nose and mouth.
▪ Their hair is black and coarse, and their cheek bones are high.
▪ Prominent projections of the bones can become sore to touch, especially the cheek bones.
▪ Mr Wray suffered a dislocated fractured cheek bone.
▪ He argued that criminals were physically distinguishable by, for example, large jaws, high cheek bones, extra toes and so on.
▪ In the light from the streetlamp Kate could see the long dark lashes against her daughter's cheek bones.
▪ The blow caught her on the right side of her face, high on the cheek bone, beneath the eye.
▪ I saw small wounds, red gashes, high on the cheek bones.
china
▪ Interest is building up in Waterford Wedgwood, makers of the famous crystal glassware and bone china.
▪ There are vases of tulips and bowls of fruit, a bone china tea set and a stack of decorated hatboxes.
▪ A delicate process of lithography brings out the richness of the bird's colouring on Coalport's finest bone china.
▪ This year 31 new studies in fine bone china and porcelain have been introduced.
▪ Fine bone china is made from three main raw materials - china stone, china clay and animal bone.
▪ We've got to treat you like best bone china.
▪ The subjects of many of her pictures have been transferred to Limoges dinnerware and transformed into limited-edition bone china figurines.
▪ Royal Tuscan will continue to produce a wide variety of fine bone china ware.
collar
▪ Sandra is still under sedation in hospital, suffering from internal injuries and a broken collar bone.
▪ Bruises on Maria were pronounced and regular proof of assaults, culminating in the broken collar bone of the previous October.
▪ The inquest in Cardiff heard doctors failed to spot Alison had also broken her collar bone.
▪ He had multiple fractures down his right side, including a smashed collar bone and arm.
▪ The motorcyclist, Ian Clague, of Bentley, suffered a broken collar bone.
▪ A fussy neighbour broke his collar bone building barricades against the hippies.
▪ To them, recovering from a broken collar bone in the opulent surroundings of Clarence House, would be luxury.
density
▪ A dose response to oestrogens has been shown with increasing doses having greater effects on bone density.
▪ Hologic makes medical equipment that measures bone density, used to diagnose osteoporosis.
▪ In some this may be a result of an imprecision of the techniques of bone density measurement.
▪ Is essential for normal skeleton development in children and adolescents, and for maintaining high bone density in young adults.
▪ They argue, as others have done, that screening is appropriate because bone density is related to subsequent risk of fracture.
▪ When resorption overtakes formation, the result is a decrease in bone density and strength.
▪ It was discovered that black girls gain 34% more bone density during puberty, compared to only 11% in white girls.
▪ The benefits included higher bone density, faster reaction times, greater muscle strength and better balance.
loss
▪ This dose of oestrogen has previously been shown to be the minimum required to prevent bone loss in normal menopausal women.
▪ It may reduce the accelerated bone loss of menopause, even in the absence of estrogen replacement therapy. 3.
▪ Each patient had three measurements of bone mineral density and rates of bone loss were estimated by linear regression for each subject.
▪ Estrogen replacement relieves such symptoms of menopause as hot flashes and night sweats, reduces bone loss and relieves vaginal dryness.
▪ And whether they are reducing bone loss.
▪ Such amenorrhoea is associated with bone loss, and this can be prevented by the judicious use of cyclical hormones.
▪ It is not clear at the moment if bone loss occurs among people with bulimia.
▪ In older patients this effect can cause bone loss and loosening of alumina based implants.
marrow
▪ My bone marrow was harvested a couple of weeks ago and the whole thing was a piece of cake.
▪ Chemotherapy worked on cancer but was destroying her bone marrow, so treatment had to be altered.
▪ Radium is readily absorbed into the body where it concentrates in the bone marrow and gives off very damaging alpha particles.
▪ Phenylbutazone may be associated with serious bone marrow toxicity and should, therefore, be avoided.
▪ His only chance of survival was a bone marrow transplant.
▪ Her mentor, Jim Teyechea, pushed Nogales' plight into the national spotlight, before he died of bone marrow cancer.
▪ He received two blood transfusions after a bone marrow transplant and wanted the name so he could sue the donor.
▪ In adults, normal bone marrow contains largely fat and therefore has a high signal.
structure
▪ Paula Grey, a raven haired girl in her early thirties with strong bone structure, had just entered the office.
▪ This is a young woman whose bone structure is not fully developed.
▪ He says it can distort bone structure, even cause heart problems.
▪ His features were delicate; he had the bone structure of a professional model.
▪ She had excellent bone structure, a well-shaped determined chin, a good figure and long legs.
▪ The neck itself is subject to a form of clinical exposure, its bone structure shifting and projecting.
▪ As she tilted her face upwards to answer, her bone structure was thrown into transitory relief.
▪ Under the microscope even the bone structure of these dinosaurs looks more like that of living mammals than cold-blooded reptiles.
■ VERB
break
▪ Rex broke two bones in his leg.
▪ It would break every bone in your body, just like Richard.
▪ He watches her face and he smiles the way he smiled when I broke my bones.
▪ I was afraid of doing something wrong and ending up at the bottom in a mess of twisted metal and broken bones.
▪ The shaman broke the bones with his bare hands, and used the jagged edges to scratch at his bark.
▪ Helps older adults maintain balance and coordination, which prevents falling, broken bones and other injuries. 2.
▪ The inquest in Cardiff heard doctors failed to spot Alison had also broken her collar bone.
▪ Murray was much worse: both legs broken and bone protruding through his pelt.
chill
▪ He was feeling the clammy cold that seemed to penetrate his thick coat and chill his bones.
▪ The cold autumn-night air had chilled her to the bone, numbing her limbs with the dampness of the ground.
▪ The target unit is chilled to the bone, causing limbs to snap and weapons to break.
▪ A gust of wet wind blew down the alleyway, chilling me to the bone.
▪ By that time I was chilled to the bone, exhausted from the relentless battering of the traffic, sullen and depressed.
▪ The very prospect of her life being picked over like some succulent titbit chilled her to the bone.
▪ The cold wind closed around her like an icy fist, chilling her to the bone.
cut
▪ It had a lethal edge now which cut her to the bone.
▪ These icy cold droplets seemed to cut through to the bone as if to punish him for the way he was.
▪ Budgets are tight and subject to sudden change, and inessentials, such as maintenance, are cut to the bone.
▪ To carve the joint, stand it with the ribs underneath, cut away the chine bone and discard.
▪ Rose, whose own profits were already cut to the bone to get the order, knew that she was on trial.
▪ His mockery, which he meant as love, frightened and cut her to the bone.
▪ Anything would have been better than this ice-cold contempt that cut her to the bone.
feel
▪ The fog horn started booming, a deep, thrilling vibration that Madame Astarti could feel resonate in her bones.
▪ Just then he felt the bone pop, then slide painfully free, and he was not grateful but angry now.
▪ And he was innocent of murder; she felt it in her bones.
▪ I can feel the bone hard and resistant and enlarged.
▪ They stepped forward, and his muscles stiffened until they felt like bone.
▪ He took the stairs one at a time, a certain lonesome feeling moving into his bones.
▪ She could feel every bone and sinew of him.
▪ He could feel it in his bones, and he knew he could trust the feeling.
pick
▪ That's if the lawyers left her anything after they'd picked over the bones.
▪ It tastes delicious and I pick it to the bone like a meticulous cat.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bag of bones
be skin and bone
▪ The poor dog was practically skin and bone.
▪ When she died she was nothing but skin and bone.
be skin and bones
close to the bone
cut sb to the quick/bone
▪ Anything would have been better than this ice-cold contempt that cut her to the bone.
▪ His mockery, which he meant as love, frightened and cut her to the bone.
▪ It had a lethal edge now which cut her to the bone.
▪ Son, you really cut down to the quick.
▪ That's probably why she sent him - she knew it would cut him to the quick.
▪ The answer cut him to the quick.
▪ These icy cold droplets seemed to cut through to the bone as if to punish him for the way he was.
need some (more) meat on your bones
▪ Matt, you need some more meat on your bones!
the bare bones
▪ I don't know how we can cut any more spending. We're down to the bare bones.
▪ GUIs provide the padding to the bare bones of the system.
▪ Many different lines of evidence may be used to flesh out the bare bones of the fossils.
▪ Rip Rig created a heady hybrid out of the bare bones of jazz improvisation, dub-funk rhythms and punk attitude.
▪ The above is the bare bones of the arrangement.
▪ The strength of this book is that it puts flesh on the bare bones of this argument.
▪ These are the bare bones of a long and distinguished scientific career.
▪ This is boxing stripped down to the bare bones.
▪ We have outlined only the bare bones of the B & B method.
work your fingers to the bone
▪ His mother had had a hard life - had worked her fingers to the bone bringing up six children.
▪ In those days we got up at 5 in the morning, and worked our fingers to the bone.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Did you give this bone to the dog?
▪ She broke two bones in her arm.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A gust of wet wind blew down the alleyway, chilling me to the bone.
▪ Fatigue seeps like ice water into bones and joints.
▪ My son feels long and stringy now, all sinew, veins and bone.
▪ Rib chops are identified by the slightly curved rib bone and the presence of the rib-eye muscle outside of the curve.
▪ The hip and femur bones were fused together and no movement was possible at that joint.
▪ They flowed into the taut nostrils and along the prominent bones in the cheek.
▪ They have looked upon the bones of the prehistoric dead and seen evidence of a Stone Age holocaust.
▪ Trampling Another source of modification to bone that begins soon after death is dispersal and breakage by trampling.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
up
▪ I spent the time before it boning up on things like Troops Out.
▪ Talk about boning up on sorrow.
▪ A really thorough murderer would have boned up on both subjects more intently.
▪ In his first day, Bulger began boning up on university business and spoke by phone with campus chancellors.
▪ So if you hate the theory so much, how come you're so boned up on it?
▪ Listeners preparing to bone up on the one-act Strauss shocker opening Oct. 18 should consider this Vienna production.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bag of bones
be skin and bone
▪ The poor dog was practically skin and bone.
▪ When she died she was nothing but skin and bone.
be skin and bones
close to the bone
need some (more) meat on your bones
▪ Matt, you need some more meat on your bones!
the bare bones
▪ I don't know how we can cut any more spending. We're down to the bare bones.
▪ GUIs provide the padding to the bare bones of the system.
▪ Many different lines of evidence may be used to flesh out the bare bones of the fossils.
▪ Rip Rig created a heady hybrid out of the bare bones of jazz improvisation, dub-funk rhythms and punk attitude.
▪ The above is the bare bones of the arrangement.
▪ The strength of this book is that it puts flesh on the bare bones of this argument.
▪ These are the bare bones of a long and distinguished scientific career.
▪ This is boxing stripped down to the bare bones.
▪ We have outlined only the bare bones of the B & B method.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
boned salmon
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ I spent the time before it boning up on things like Troops Out.
▪ Scrape meat away from leg:, bone and remove bones.
Wikipedia

Bone (corsetry)

In corsetry, a bone is one of the rigid parts of a corset that forms its frame and gives it rigidity.

Bone

A bone is a rigid organ that constitutes part of the vertebral skeleton. Bones support and protect the various organs of the body, produce red and white blood cells, store minerals and also enable mobility as well as support for the body. Bone tissue is a type of dense connective tissue. Bones come in a variety of shapes and sizes and have a complex internal and external structure. They are lightweight yet strong and hard, and serve multiple functions. Mineralized osseous tissue, or bone tissue, is of two types, cortical and cancellous, and gives a bone rigidity and a coral-like three-dimensional internal structure. Other types of tissue found in bones include marrow, endosteum, periosteum, nerves, blood vessels and cartilage.

Bone is an active tissue composed of different types of bone cells. Osteoblasts are involved in the creation and mineralisation of bone; osteocytes and osteoclasts are involved in the reabsorption of bone tissue. The mineralised matrix of bone tissue has an organic component mainly of collagen and an inorganic component of bone mineral made up of various salts.

In the human body at birth, there are over 270 bones, but many of these fuse together during development, leaving a total of 206 separate bones in the adult, not counting numerous small sesamoid bones. The largest bone in the body is the thigh-bone ( femur) and the smallest is the stapes in the middle ear.

Bone (comics)

Bone is an independently published comic book series, written and illustrated by Jeff Smith, originally serialized in 55 irregularly released issues from 1991 to 2004.

Smith's black-and-white drawings were inspired by animated cartoons and comic strips, a notable influence being Walt Kelly's Pogo: "I was ... a big fan of Carl Barks and Pogo, so it was just natural for me to want to draw that kind of mixture of Walt Kelly and Moebius." Accordingly, the story is singularly characterized by a combination of both light-hearted comedy and dark, epic fantasy: Time has called the series "as sweeping as the Lord of the Rings cycle, but much funnier." The series was published bimonthly with some delays from June 1991 to June 2004. The series was self-published by Smith's Cartoon Books for issues #1 through #19, by Image Comics from issues #20 to #28, and back to Cartoon Books for issues #29 through #55 (the final one).

Bone has received numerous awards, among them ten Eisner Awards and eleven Harvey Awards.

Bone (disambiguation)

A bone is a rigid connective organ that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates.

Bone may also refer to:

Bone (1972 film)

Bone, also known as Beverly Hills Nightmare, Dial Rat for Terror and Housewife, is a 1972 American film directed by Larry Cohen.

Bone (2005 film)

Bone is a 48-minute 2005 documentary about the first modern dance co-production between Canada and China, directed and choreographed by Nadine Thouin (Go-On Productions/ formerly Snell Thouin Project) in collaboration with the Beijing Modern Dance Company. The film was directed by Mila Aung-Thwin of EyeSteelFilm production company and produced by EyeSteelFilm. It had its premier at Bravo! specialty television channel.

China Times had a favorable review, saying, "In the performance of Chinese and Canadian artists, we witness a sort of artistic pulling force, which may well become the future direction of art."

Bône (département)

''' Bône ''' is a former French département in Algeria which existed between 1955 and 1962.

Considered as a French province, Algeria was departmentalised on 9 December 1848. Three civil zones ( départements) replaced the three beyliks into which the Ottoman former rulers had divided the territory. The easternmost of the three original Algerian departments was called Constantine. For over a century the town of Annaba, known at that time as Bône (and in classical times as Hippo), was a sub-prefecture in the département of Constantine: this changed in 1955.

On 7 August 1955 the eastern extremity of the former département of Constantine was split off and became the separate département of Bône. This administrative reorganisation was a response to the rapid population increase experienced across the territory, especially during the preceding decade.

The new coastal département of Bône covered an area of 25,367 km²: a population of 730,594 was recorded. The department comprised five sub-prefectures: these were La Calle, Clairfontaine, Guelma, Souk Ahras and Tébessa. A final but temporary change took place between 17 March 1958 and 7 November 1959, during which time the Tébessa sub-prefectures was transferred to the département of Batna.

The département of Bône remained in existence until after the independence of Algeria and subsequently became Annaba Province.

Bone (surname)

Bone is a surname. Notable people with the surname Bone include:

  • Adrián Bone (born 1988), Ecuadorian footballer
  • Alex Bone (born 1971), Scottish footballer
  • Deborah Bone (1963–2014), British mental health nurse
  • Drummond Bone, British academic, expert on Byron
  • Edith Bone (1889–1975), Hungarian medical professional, journalist and translator
  • Edwina Bone (born 1988), Australian field hockey player
  • Eleanor Bone (1911–2001), English Wiccan
  • Gavin Bone (born 1964), English author and lecturer in the fields of magic and witchcraft
  • Henry Pierce Bone (1779–1855), English enamel painter
  • Homer Bone (1883–1970), United States federal judge and Senator from Washington
  • Ian Bone (born 1947), English anarchist
  • Ian Bone (author) (born 1956), Australian writer, author and novelist
  • James Bone (1872–1962), British journalist and London editor of The Guardian
  • Jimmy Bone (born 1949), Scottish footballer
  • John Bone (disambiguation), multiple people, including:
    • John Bone (bishop) (1930–2014), British religious leader
    • John T. Bone (born 1947), British-born actor
    • John Gavin Bone (born 1914), Scottish Olympic cyclist
  • Kelsey Bone (born 1991), American basketball player
  • Ken Bone (born 1958), American basketball coach
  • Mick Bone (born 1942), Australian rules footballer
  • Muirhead Bone (1876–1953), Scottish artist
  • Peter Bone (born 1952), British politician
  • Philip J. Bone (1873–1964), English mandolinist and guitar play
  • Phyllis Bone (1894–1972), Scottish sculptor
  • Ponty Bone, American accordionist
  • Randall Bone (born 1973), Australian rules footballer
  • Robert Trewick Bone (1790–1840), English painter of sacred, classical and genre scenes
  • Scott Cordelle Bone (1869–1936), American politician, founded Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, Governor of Alaska
  • Stephen Bone (1904–1958), English artist and writer
  • Tiberiu Bone (1929–1983), Romanian footballer
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Bone

Bone \Bone\ (b[=o]n; 110), n. [OE. bon, ban, AS. b[=a]n; akin to Icel. bein, Sw. ben, Dan. & D. been, G. bein bone, leg; cf. Icel. beinn straight.]

  1. (Anat.) The hard, calcified tissue of the skeleton of vertebrate animals, consisting very largely of calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, and gelatine; as, blood and bone.

    Note: Even in the hardest parts of bone there are many minute cavities containing living matter and connected by minute canals, some of which connect with larger canals through which blood vessels ramify.

  2. One of the pieces or parts of an animal skeleton; as, a rib or a thigh bone; a bone of the arm or leg; also, any fragment of bony substance. (pl.) The frame or skeleton of the body.

  3. Anything made of bone, as a bobbin for weaving bone lace.

  4. pl. Two or four pieces of bone held between the fingers and struck together to make a kind of music.

  5. pl. Dice.

  6. Whalebone; hence, a piece of whalebone or of steel for a corset.

  7. Fig.: The framework of anything.

    A bone of contention, a subject of contention or dispute.

    A bone to pick, something to investigate, or to busy one's self about; a dispute to be settled (with some one).

    Bone ash, the residue from calcined bones; -- used for making cupels, and for cleaning jewelry.

    Bone black (Chem.), the black, carbonaceous substance into which bones are converted by calcination in close vessels; -- called also animal charcoal. It is used as a decolorizing material in filtering sirups, extracts, etc., and as a black pigment. See Ivory black, under Black.

    Bone cave, a cave in which are found bones of extinct or recent animals, mingled sometimes with the works and bones of man.
    --Am. Cyc.

    Bone dust, ground or pulverized bones, used as a fertilizer.

    Bone earth (Chem.), the earthy residuum after the calcination of bone, consisting chiefly of phosphate of calcium.

    Bone lace, a lace made of linen thread, so called because woven with bobbins of bone.

    Bone oil, an oil obtained by, heating bones (as in the manufacture of bone black), and remarkable for containing the nitrogenous bases, pyridine and quinoline, and their derivatives; -- also called Dippel's oil.

    Bone setter. Same as Bonesetter. See in the Vocabulary.

    Bone shark (Zo["o]l.), the basking shark.

    Bone spavin. See under Spavin.

    Bone turquoise, fossil bone or tooth of a delicate blue color, sometimes used as an imitation of true turquoise.

    Bone whale (Zo["o]l.), a right whale.

    To be upon the bones of, to attack. [Obs.]

    To make no bones, to make no scruple; not to hesitate.

    To pick a bone with, to quarrel with, as dogs quarrel over a bone; to settle a disagreement. [Colloq.]

Bone

Bone \Bone\ (b[=o]n), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Boned (b[=o]nd); p. pr. & vb. n. Boning.]

  1. To withdraw bones from the flesh of, as in cookery. ``To bone a turkey.''
    --Soyer.

  2. To put whalebone into; as, to bone stays.
    --Ash.

  3. To fertilize with bone.

  4. To steal; to take possession of. [Slang]

Bone

Bone \Bone\, v. t. [F. bornoyer to look at with one eye, to sight, fr. borgne one-eyed.] To sight along an object or set of objects, to see if it or they be level or in line, as in carpentry, masonry, and surveying.
--Knight.

Joiners, etc., bone their work with two straight edges. W.
--M. Buchanan.

Wiktionary

bone

Etymology 1

  1. Of an off-white colour, like the colour of bone. alt. (context uncountable English) A composite material consisting largely of calcium phosphate and collagen and making up the skeleton of most vertebrates. n. (context uncountable English) A composite material consisting largely of calcium phosphate and collagen and making up the skeleton of most vertebrates. v

  2. 1 To prepare (meat, etc) by remove the bone or bones from. 2 To fertilize with bone. 3 To put whalebone into. 4 (context civil engineering English) To make level, using a particular procedure; to survey a level line. 5 (context vulgar slang of a man English) To have sexual intercourse with. 6 (context Australia dated in Aboriginal culture English) To perform "bone pointing", a ritual that is intended to bring illness or even death to the victim. 7 (context usually with "up" English) To study. 8 To polish boots to a shiny finish. Etymology 2

    vb. (context transitive slang English) To apprehend, steal. Etymology 3

    vb. (context carpentry masonry surveying English) To sight along an object or set of objects to check whether they are level or in line.

WordNet

bone

  1. n. rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates [syn: os]

  2. the porous calcified substance from which bones are made [syn: osseous tissue]

  3. a shade of white the color of bleached bones [syn: ivory, pearl, off-white]

bone

adj. consisting of or made up of bone; "a bony substance"; "the bony framework of the body"

bone

  1. v. study intensively, as before an exam; "I had to bone up on my Latin verbs before the final exam" [syn: cram, grind away, drum, bone up, swot, get up, mug up, swot up]

  2. remove the bones from; "bone the turkey before roasting it" [syn: debone]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

bone

Old English ban "bone, tusk," from Proto-Germanic *bainam (cognates: Old Frisian ben, Old Norse bein, Danish ben, German Bein). No cognates outside Germanic (the common PIE root is *os-; see osseous); the Norse, Dutch, and German cognates also mean "shank of the leg," and this is the main meaning in Modern German, but English never seems to have had this sense.

bone

especially in bone up "study," 1880s student slang, probably from "Bohn's Classical Library," a popular series in higher education published by German-born English publisher Henry George Bohn (1796-1884) as part of a broad series of "libraries" he issued from 1846, totaling 766 volumes, continued after 1864 by G. Bell & Sons.

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "bone".

Now that the words were out and there was no abjuration possible, she felt as if her bones were made of sand.

Another moment she could see, as if through a dirtied window, some place she knew, but had lost, and her old bones ached with wanting to be there.

The chalk had been put back over her and Granny Aching, who always said that the hills were in her bones, now had her bones in the hills.

Spasming, Acies moaned in pain as broken bones knit themselves together and bruises faded.

Though usually in such cases the growth is of an unbalanced or localized sort, as in acromegaly, where the bones of the hands or jaw become abnormally enlarged.

But with the incidence of acromegaly, the extremities continue to become enlarged, the hands and feet, the bones and cutaneous tissues of the face.

The bones exfoliated, the spine and the acromial end of the scapula came away, and a good stump was formed.

On the fifth day the line of demarcation extended to the spine of the scapula, laying bare the bone and exposing the acromion process and involving the pectoral muscles.

At the second ballet at the opera an actress dressed in a tippet held out her cap to the bones as if to beg an alms, while she was dancing a pas de deux.

The exposed bone is somewhat decalcified, and adipocere seems firmly established throughout.

El sprang back, gagging, but the bones and the horrible puddle that had been Nadrathen were already afire, blazing from within.

Honorius the afrit leaped upon the bonnet of the car, femurs akimbo, hands on hip bones, skull cocked at a jaunty angle.

To understand what the aging process does to your bones, think about what termites do to a house.

With a deer rib bone whose end she had hollowed out to make a small depression, she fed him the agrimony concentration in small sips sometime near midnight.

I do your errand, for you are like two kelpies from the river, and will have ague in your bones in another hour.