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Blow-Up (DJ duo)

Blow-Up is a DJ duo from California.

Blow-Up (soundtrack)

Blow-Up is a soundtrack album by Herbie Hancock featuring music composed for Michelangelo Antonioni's film Blow-Up released in 1966 on MGM Records. The album features performances by Hancock, Freddie Hubbard, Joe Newman, Phil Woods, Joe Henderson, Jim Hall, Ron Carter, and Jack DeJohnette. Although Jimmy Smith is credited with playing organ on the album some sources claim it was Paul Griffin that was present at the recording sessions.

The album also includes "Stroll On", a rewrite of Tiny Bradshaw's " Train Kept A-Rollin'", by the Yardbirds featuring Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page. The liner notes to a 2000s CD release indicate that Hancock first recorded his score in London with British musicians, but rejected the results and re-recorded the music in New York with American jazz musicians. The bassline to "Bring Down the Birds" was sampled by Deee-Lite for their 1990 single " Groove is in the Heart."

A mono mix of this album (MGM E4447ST) features slightly longer versions of several songs. The CD of this soundtrack currently in print includes along with Hancock's material, two Lovin' Spoonful songs recorded by British musicians which are used as incidental music in the film and two songs recorded by British rock act Tomorrow which were originally intended for use in the film. This CD also features an alternate take of "Bring Down the Birds."

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

blow-up

noun
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But a day after the blow-up, the committee assigned to seek a compromise won a three-month reprieve.
▪ Few of us are comfortable with confrontations because they frequently lead to full-fledged blow-ups.
▪ It is possible to find safe harbor but nearly impossible to do so without a few blow-ups.
▪ It was a job of the utmost precision, and even a large-scale blow-up might not reveal that it was not genuine.
▪ Kirov had used his services before, to produce false papers, touch up prints or produce blow-ups from microfilm.
▪ Mr O'Sullivan filled an enormous cavity completely painlessly, while a video screen showed a blow-up of the tooth being worked on.
▪ Walls are covered with grainy blow-ups of sleek-jawed Latin athletes.
Wiktionary

blow-up

a. inflatable#English; able to be blow up. n. 1 An explosion (physical or emotional). 2 An enlargement (e.g. of a photo).

Usage examples of "blow-up".

We broke out of overdrive when the blow-up came, and there was the pirate.

Javan spotted Declan Carmody occasionally, but that troubled man was still not back to full duty following his blow-up of some three months before.

When he was with the scratchers he had slept on one of the blow-up mattresses that they kept in the back of the van.

Bicycles, swing sets, maybe a little blow-up pool, squeals and splashing.

He had copiloted the Voskhod 3 mission in 1966, a flight in which an adapted one-man Vostok capsule had taken two men, precariously, into orbit, and Viktorenko had watched as his copilot had taken a space walk out of a flimsy blow-up airlock.

He began passing the vertex detector traces into the analog signal bus, and pulled out a blow-up overview of various detector slabs.

Turning right, they saw huge blow-ups of Cecilia and Hermione as Donna Anna and Donna Elvira and even a cardboard cut-out of Georgie clutching a rock.

Now, this, blow-up here is of Alfred Dummel and Else Bennrich in the German film, The Blood Drinker, made in 1928.

Year after year I got especially chosen and, I supposed, honored to deal with the rain-or-no-rain million-dollar gamble on fine weather for the night the skies blazed with the multicolored firework star bursts sent up in memory of Guy Fawkes and his blow-up Parliament gunpowder plot.

Christ, Zach, why don't you just buy a blow-up love doll on Bourbon Street and be done with it?

He would remember for a long time the silence in the room while everyone stared again at the blow-up photographs of the Typhoons, the blurred pictures hastily snapped by brave Nato agents: twice the size of the Americans' Ohios, these titanium Typhoons were monstrous engines of destruction.